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Atlanta Constitution Newspaper Archive: December 11, 1890 - Page 1

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   Atlanta Constitution, The (Newspaper) - December 11, 1890, Atlanta, Georgia                               "fTTF f, f- ATLANTA CON T UT ..a.. ..AS ATLANTA, DECEMBER 11, PEICE FIVE CENTS. ULT AREPUBUCAN CAUCUS IT twrti 3Xen Want Financial Not Waste Further TJJBO an the Force Bill. t December t in senators caucussed on the I At at tbe residence of Senator UlQ3 called for the ostensible considering tho advisability ol The force bill, in the interestof c station w relieve the present de- of country. THS SEAL CAUSB. cause of the caucus, however, was i President Harrison and Senator i to know the exact posi- Mie senators. In this, however. Subtle JCQU led astray, and it looks now S? Re bill ia doomed. Senators Wal- ll 'p n j, Stewart and Dolph made ringing J jl tbe openinc of the caucus 'be tiaie ol the congress of the United EjT "sssted on a measure which the e -3 country eared nothing about, t i d fee enacting financial legislation the present state of affairs. fttit would bo best, indeed, the :hing, to lay the bill aside and te enactment of legislation to pre- in tbe money market, and 10 re- pressed condition oi the agricul- IOAC AN'O SFOONT3B ;uj itors Hoar and Spooner would not Kai ;his. They argued vigorously for ____. of the bill. The administration of -publican party was committed to ttui'J party would ruin itself to desert tH hlA 'Ins stage of the game, ARRANGEMENT REACHED. iidj- i nagr controversy, a committee of six 113 appointed to devise means for (maim debate on the force bill, in order ftin-u-i vote on the measure might bo bta 30011. This comnnttee was also in- 'ormulate a measure to relieve the mei. ditionof financial affa rs, and to gMtf bi_ 10 a caucus to be hold Monday was decided, in the meantime, to 'i a resolution tomorroxv, if possible. pe n sat the senate at 10 o'clock in fe i r, 12 aiid rrfinain. in session till 5 o'clock in moon, when a recess shall be taken i and tlie session then to continue bu Ji- ight as long as any senator desires to bfc v 'e election bill. 3oar then asked all senators-who to the force bill, or who were closing the debate by some means, Of course, no one stood up, and -nonuced that Tie tlioucht all tho 9, with three or four exceptions, s olan, and would vote for the bill. A SNAG MAY BE STKtJCK. rn senator that a snag struck -n devising a manner of T3baio, especially as Senator In- 1 that lie would not bo raado a fn any gag rules. i senator had also it would 3 to upon Vice President a rala in operation, and Tierliaps, no senator on the floor iu the rules in Ins own hands t of Reed, he n anted to know u n i'jQ done. This provoked a djs- ,mi m which Senator Installs said they not couat upon hi m to utrnetrate any lire men tiie old established rules and 'cedents of the L'ena-te. O.G.imT REVOLUTIONARY PLANS. irt.ers participated, all of whom expressed 'vea ajeamiG any revolutionary proceed- m i 1 then Granny HOOT agreed to have i 9 of debate in the hands of the com- oiflw they could devise no legal means to v jte and get a vote, he supposed he THE f1 -'to consent to lay aside the elec- to aad proceed to consider the financial 2sw wliieh the committee would propose. O? THE 31OVB, can be bat one meaning to this. Tho want a free coinage bill, or decidedly oa tbat order, and they 4 'or theforce bill. They are going tolsn lit have determined to let Granny his partisan gang down as easy as fart-r was not present. He went toescape this caucus. the force bill, but wants to save To da this he is preparing a bill H be ol no practical consequence, ttvhiob he thinks, tiia democrats will not Qtiiit than to record their votes Ahm t This bill he will bring before the m that it be adopted as a aubstl- is not improbable, but the 'i Tith itg federal troops, marshals cam' ag boardy, is a corpse. Interestine Ite___ fcna Colqiiitt has been confined to his Ju i few days with a bad cold. He has, a speech on the force bill, ill probably deliver on Friday. w D, Cluplev, of Florida, candidate iafe against Senator Call, has been i for a few days. He not own election, but says the Florida of able men, who will in the selection of a Beuaror. read here with more interest, 1'a Ocala conventioix has ended, of the senatorial tight in'South the oltl members want to see retorned, but they have T bopo, 'Valsli and -wife loft here this Now Yort, where they will re- 1 uj.ys before returning to Augusta. 1 ViC liaildins EiUs In Danger. seonii, is playmsr at old -d.iy public building bills to tho r- ,000.000 the house. Many ha-] passed tho senate. They 'n njifor some lime, and although l! h "'lam cat off. to keep down the A ''-1 found that it was a matter r Consequently, he save that ,t r ciauae was 5tncken out of T :s, as they are, the in f ns are recosnized, but there is i.ji.'opriation to construct them. 1 any of them can commence, 1' n ona coinmittoe will have to pro- 114 for the work. Now sueh mat- provided for ia the anndry t c is plan to let theappro- r any of these buildings go over 1 'ogress, when the democrats will Among the bills in this -annah and Borne buildings i-'1 all right, for if money t A cute trick' this is on the t KodeMj. appointment of Attorney. General Miller, Senator Sanders, of "I am Harri- son !g Appoint his old iaw partner. I Alroitt this pros'uleut's modesty tvould not tleteriiim from apiuriutiug his son Kussell, who, lie thinks, tiaa not .only the legal qimliH- cations fpr position, '-but a .majesty and [race of person wbicb woold at once honor and adorn the ermine of the supreme bench." The Total Population. The total population of the country, inelnd- ig Indians, etc., will reach Already the census office has actually romraod, n round ngures., U19.0GO Indians and whites in [ndiaii territory. These, wiili the popuiatiou of. AlasUa, which Special Agent Fetroff. esti- mates at will bring up the total popula- tion of the ammrv to OS.COO.OUO, a numerical gain oC for the decade. ThrfHiiTO- and Harbor BUI. Tho house.cowinittee on nvera anil harbors today formally decided not to prepare river and harbor appropriation bills during this ses- sion of congress. Tlio1 Compound Bill- The senate committee on agriculture liaa reported the compound lard bill to the senate without recommendation. The chances are bill will be defeated in tbe senate if '.t ever reaches a voto. E. VV. B. TECH; TOBACCO REBATE THE STATE 01 TRADE. Sent to the President for His tlecttun BUI. Dpcember 10. Senator ?lumb offered a resolution for the meeting of tlie senate daily at 10 o'clock a. m.. with a recess-Jroui till 8, and asked for its mmediate consideration. Mr. it be printed and lie over. So ordered. On motion of Mr. Aldrich, tbe house bill to luthorize the payment of the drawback or ra- aate on tobacco, to correct the omission in the tariff bill, was taken up. Mr. Sherman explained how it was that he sad stated, n hen the question first came before ;he stated positively and the omission of the drawback provision from the enrolled bill was intentional. Lie had opposed, in conleroncei tho al.'owauco ol the. drawback because his experience was ;hac dlraivbacks were always attended with fraud, and had preferred to give dealers in to- bacco until the 1st of July to get rid of tiieir old stocks. The conference committee had agreed to that view and it was subsequently, when he was not that tho drawback provision had been agreed to. He thought it right now, however, that the bill should pass, The bill passed, and it now goeg to the president for hia approval. The senate then. it o'clock, resumed consideauion of tho election bill. lr. Georgo, of Mississippi, toofc the floor against the bill. He occumed juss four hours in the delivery of his all of which be read from joanuscript. The floor was then takenfcy Mr. of Iowa. Mr, Hoar, refering; to the notice which he. had given yesterday of a motion for a nigHt session to continue the debate, said that on consukat.on with several senators he would not make that motion now.' A lot of amend- ments made hy the house to the senate Oillafor public buildings taken up, uume agcead to and others rejected, and on those latter a conference wqs Air. oifered a resolution, which went over tin tomorrow, directing the committeeon and elections to inquire and report whether the right to vote lor presidential electors, representatives in congress and. exec- utive and judicwfci officers of the state, or mom- bora of thereof, is denied to any ot (ho ma.o inhabitants ui any stale, be.ug tu-enty-one years -Af-asfe and a United States, or in any way abridged, except for partic pation in rebellion or crime. Mr. Allison renewed the mado by him ao.ne days ago, for the reprint of the election bill, with the house provisions senate provisions in paxalioL coluuiua. Tho siifigest 011 gave r.so to a as to what the senate bill really was, tnere having been already two varying editions of it printed. Finally tt.e diBicuity was got over. Orderwas made and the senate ai THIS PRESIDENT'S Interest It An Attempfc to flive Fails. WASHINGTON, Decembep 10. On motion of Mr. Henderson, of Illinois. J. W. Hathaway was elected postmaster the house. Mr. McKm'oy, of Ohio, stated that he hud been directed by the on ways and means to report the resolution Tor the distribu- tion of the president's annual message, and1, upon hia motion, the honso resoft otl itself into A committee of tho whole for its consideration. Though technically the resolution atrotild have beun. reposed to the house, by inadvertence it wa-> reported to the committee oi the whole. Mr. Breckmriflge, of Kentucky, made, a point of order against tins isrocediire, but witlidrew his point affer expUnnnff that he did not wish tho orecedent to be founded upon thia action Iii response to a question b> Sir. Hooker, o-f Mibsis'sippi, Mr. MclCmley stated that so much of the message as referred to the election bill was assigned to the belect counmttea on elec- tion of pi-evident, vice president and members of congress. Mr. Hooker thereupon expressed his desire to so amend tho insolation as to send that por- tion of the message to the judiciary CQimnit- Mr. McXinley announced hia wSllingress to have the amandment but objected to debate, as lie was acting by courteij- of the chairman of the eomuuttee on- ludiau affairs, to committee tho day had boon signed. lie, therefore, moved that the committee rise. This motion was agreed to and tho went info a committee of the whole on btiis reported from tho committee on Indian Oiilj one b-11 tlie relief of the mission Indians in California, when the house __ __ THE FULSH; An Unlooted For Incident in The .World Opening Celebration. NEW YORK. December At 3 o'clock tonight the Hash light, used to take an immense picture of tho new World buiidaig- exploded on top of the city with terrible force. Tho capine -jtone, weighing potmds.was broken oil the Cit> hall, falling to the ground. About fifty panes of were shattered. Tho heavy plate glass m the Puutger builduig itseit was broken. STo one was injured. A number of women at The World reception fainted. Tills la S FRAXCISCO, December 10. This morn- broke out in the linseed oil works olKlt- Co., near and King streota, chia city caused by a vat. of oil boilkig STRING EffCT STATES HAS A DEPRESSING EFFECT ABROAD. A JUglit BasincBK, Volume of Orders from Cbilia at Induce MAKCHESTEH, Decem ian's commercial artiCie stringency in tlie Unite tailure in the India trade effect upon the market. For some directions is large, b.asine.s.i is light. Orders for I mi. a, and China continue to he re- ceived in fair volume, though some are at re- duced rates, owing to the decline in A moderate proportion ia executed. A STEAJJY JJTTT SMALL BUSINESS. For elsewhere thtjre is a steady, though small business. Some houses are doing little. Tarn is quiet. Some export orders have been exe- cuted which had previously been refused. Tho tendency is downward, tlioush quotations are unchanged- China bundles are very dull. Business in the cloth department is orders being chiefly foreman quantities. There are numerous inquiries for approved makes of gray goods for China, but they are largely tentative. The best printing cloths are steady at a decline, common are dull. Heavy goods arc quiet. Tlie best makes are firm. JBig rstilocea in Tennessee. NASHVILLE, Tenn., December [Special.] Much excitement was occasioned iu business circles at Clarkesviijo, Montgomery county, this moraine by ihe suspension of the Frank- lin bank. Tlie suspension of thia institution was quickly followed by the assignment oi Kendrick, Pettiut Go., tobacco dealers. Two or titree hours later the Farmers' and Mer- chants' National bank suspended payment. Tiio Franklin bank w.os fl private institution, with a capital stock of paid np. The suspension of tltia bank was principally dae to tho recent Henry Seaburt, a promi- nent tobacco dealer in New York, who liad done a large credit business with the hank, The liabilities and assets of the bank are not kriowii, no schedule having vet been prepaced by the .officers. The president has published a letter stating that in his opinion the bauk, by careful management, will be able to pay its indebtedness dollar for dollar. The firm of Kendrick, Fettus Co. made a general assignment for the benefit of their creditors. Their liabilities are but their asset ts are unknown, as they did a very extensive business, and are- not yet in a posi- tion to give an accurate statement. The Farmers' and National bank had a capital stock of and was generally regarded as a very safe institution. Tho sus- Bension of the Franklin bank and the assigii- bjeitt of Kendrick, Fett.ns caused a run to be- made on the Farmers' and Merchants" bank, and for two hours depositors passed in and out, receiving their money as fast as ir was called for, until 1 o'clock, when, having paid outo'ver tho bank announced its suspension for the day. John W. Foxen, tlie cashier, tele- phed this evening to Washington city for nk Bxauiiner Campbell. Nothing as to the contflfibn oi tho bank can be learned until his arrival. tf Day ijj the Clearing: House. The clearing today issued additional cer- tificates. The total now outstanding There has heen some discussion of the wis- dom of the bairics buying bills of excHange at tho low rates now prevailing, and importing gold against them- Today ft is announced Miat the directors of the Bank of Commerce author- ized the purchase a large amount nf sterling exchange, and to take out clearing house cer- tificates. for this purchase. Liabilities of 8GO.OOO. MEMPHIS, Tenn., December 1O. L. Avorj and Raphael Simnis, conducting a busi- ness under the firm name N. L. A very Co., at Obceola, Ark. A very Simms, at Blytlieville, Ark. and N, L. Avory, at Frenchmen's Bayou, made an assign- ment yesterday afternoon ac Osceola, Ark. They wera the principal merchants of that town. Liabilities due principally to Memphis and St. .Louis creditors. Assets nominally Tire failure is attributed so poor crops and inability to make collections. COKN CROP, tobacco than hare prevailed since 1887. The rtyverage is reported at 7.7 ccnta per pound. Hay, alone of all farm products, records a tdbc.iue from last year. The present price is gT.74 per ton, and a slight falling -off is due to tifie increased product. THE COTTON BJETtTEJfS. j ,'Tlie-December returns to tho department of I -agriculture of tho valneof cotton on the plaiita- I jttons are nearly the dame as last year, the tavijrage being quite as high as the value of the previous crop, or 8.G cents. he average export price slightly exceeds >nts. this makes the cost of shipment, by m and railway or steamer, drayagc. CODI- missions, compix'bsiiig and other expenses, nearly cents per pound. TJie state averages jire as follows: Virginia, 3-7 cents per pound; Jforih Carolina, 8.7; South Carolina, 8.7; 3.6; Flor.da, S.li; Alabama, 8.6; Missis- 8.8; Tesas, 8.4; Arkan- Tennessee, S.4. TJie Suti'a Cotton Report. NEW YORK, CeceniiJer opened at -IWi advance of two piuuts on late monf closing- At a decline ot four points on December, one point on January and February, unchanged on and April, and one point advance on other jnonths from yesterday's closing prices. Tiio nsrket opened at sonic advance on better report from but the rise in that market today a cousitttr.iWe extent discounted by the United States yesterday. This raaruet soon de- veloped weakness, and. a decline lolloped the weaker closing abroad. Early months notimiy lost advance, liut further declined. January options were .nntably weak, scllinc eighteen points helow rebruary. TUiBisahigU cost for carrying cotton. Tlie want ot lundt. doubtless prevents our large :otton houses-from buying in January and selling in dietajit to secure tlieuifcc ves. Com- paratively, small pore reeciptb excited no corn- Spot cotton was quiet. TILLMAN OR HAMPTON THE 3TKXT SENATOR FKOSf SOUTH CA RIVAL FARMERS CROSS EACH OTHER And tlie Sit nation Bfecames DecWedly later- Second Callot DIs- closexlrby's Greatest Strength. The general alarm sounded" half an hour after the fare started. The tiamea could not be checked and thw en- tire establishment, with ail its contents, was destroyed. The loss will probably COO. Intunuico abont The same establishmeut na-s burned out several months ago and had recently been rebailt, Tltrco Persons Kiltcd- TVljjftBAPOi-is, persons were instantly killed at the a.nte university station of the Grea Northern rraj th.s moni- ine Thev "ere in site act ot board ug a Great Nortlicrn tram when they were run down by anOaiahairain. The victims were Ed Todd and wife, of Sioux City, Ia.. and their daugh- ter Mrs Slayton. Mrs. Slayton was the wife ol the master mechanic of the Kansas City road, and lived Tbe are Otit. NirvvviiK The entire We tf Claric's muicr tins 1 citv and Kearav -weiat 011 a strike this usorn- ins Over and prhs are out. Tho reinstated unit pat oil tended Wortli Afore Than It Has Been for Ten Years. "WASHINGTON, December returns of the agricultural department for De- cember give the average farm prices of agri- cultural products by counties, which are con- solidated in thia office to obtain the accurate averages for tjie several states. The state agents obtain similar estimates, revise and consolidate and forward the the atate averages. The department estimates, as published, are made from these duplicate and independent sources of information, which are m remark- aWe agreement aud tnay be relied upon as. a tt-ne measure of the value of the crops in the bands of the farmers. THTE CROP "WORTH MORE, The present corn crop is worth more than. the last, and the farmers will receive more for it. Un Cor lunate ty the districts of failure do not realize their portion of the advance in the a% values. The average by the returns, isoO.lceutsperbubhel, against 28.J cents for the crop of Itissj, an increase oC 77 per cent. It ia the highest December price ol the decade except that of 1SH1, the only year in which the final average of tho condition worse than that of the-present season. The average prico then, rose to cents and that of the following year was 48-4, with a better crop than the present. Tho next highest average is 44.4 iu following three .-rears of crops and cheap corn. The therefore, depend upon the quan- tity grown in the year plus the reserves from the preceding jears. The present .average shows that small crops are a sure cure for low prices, and that the of demand is still the- inain factor 111 ruakuig prices and profits. Tlie prices in seven corn surplus states are: Ohio, 51 cents: Indiana, 47; Iowa, 41; Missouri, 44; Kansas, jl; Xebraska, 48. WIIUAT CHOP. The average larm value of the wheat crop, as estimated, is 84 cents per bushel agamsttiy.S for an increase- of :iO per cent on tho prico of last >ear. The of wheatis aft'ected by the harvests of other conntnes, as corn is uol perceptibly, and, thereforet prices are not entirely governed by the size o'f Che crop. For example, the crop of 1885, though smaller than the present one, broughtmn 77 cents in December, while the crop of 1882. aggregating over bushels, tlie second larger e-ver grown, sold at 88 cents at the same dace. THR MUCK OF OATS. Tho price of oats has responded sharply to tbe pressure of the- sinail crop and vho in- created nf the short corn crop. Tlin aveiagc is cents atpunst 23 cents last >ear. It is the highest reported auice An cxa.iiiiiation of the records shows- ihat tho abundance or scarcity of corn maiena.ly al- fecvs. the value of this crop, the two grains beuijt largely iniecoitangeable m use. TUB BYS itABKET- like oats, at Oa.9 cents, ia higher than since 1381. and the same is Erne of barley Buckwheat at 57.7 marks an advance over 1 last year, but ia lower than in 1883. Tne deficiency iu the potato crop has caused m vaiaea ui a-J secvioiia at tihfi country. a-venme- 10 77.7 cents, aft ifc- i iore t i per oenVorwr the pncrt the past two years. Tae reironu prlcea BUYING SILVER. Fonr Hundred Thousand Ounces WASHINGTON, December amount of silver offered for sale to the treasury de- partment today was ounces, and the amount purchased ounces, at prices jjinging from 103 to 104.47. The hearing of the contending bidders for the Port Royal dry dock was held tuia morn- ing before tbe secretary of the navy. The bidders were present in person and wore also represented by attorneys. A letter was read from Stolbrand, of Charleston, S. C.t the lovrest bidder, withdrawing from the compe- tition. The remaining bidders are Simpson Packard, of New York, and McCarthy, of "Washington. Xo decision was reached. There will be a further hearing Saturday. Secretary Wmdom's action today indicates very plainly that he does not care to apply more than 'SB.GQO.GOO of the surplus at present to the purchase of four per cent bonds. The offerings today nearly of which over was at the rate at. which bonds were purchased yesterday. The secretary, however, confined acceptances to at 123, and at 123, a total of Thia makes tho total purchases up to date or within of the limit. Windpm issued the following notice this afternoon: The 4 per cent bonds accepted today by the secretary of tho treasury complete the amount which bo offered to purchase, and the bond re- demptions will, therefore, for the present, be limited to the 4j per cent loan, which the sec- rotary will continue to redeem at par in- terest at maturity. Tho secretary will also pncdfiase, for the Uiuoa Pacific sinking fund, an-y first mortgage Pacitio railroad bonds, which are prior lien to the subsidy banks, and pay therefor such pnces as will realize 4 per cent per annum OH the Investment. 1 he amount which will be purchased is limited for the present to The disbursements on account of the pur- chase this week of 4 per cents alone amount to and the treasurer began the payments today. Most of the money goes to New York and Boston, although today's pay- ment included for Washington deal- ers. The amount of 4.V per cent bonds re- deemed today was SSi.300, making a total to date of THEY WAISTT A FAUME For United States Senator from the Prairie Stato. SPKINGFIBLD, 111., December rep- resentatives of tbe confederation of farmers and laborers' organizations of tbe state, eluding the State Grange, Patrona of Hus- bandry, Mutual Beneficial, Farmers Alliance and the Knights of Labor, held a secret conference here yesterday. It is under- derstood that the only question under consid- eration was covering the 'election, for United States senator, from thia state. The following resolution was adopted: Whereas, On the 3d day of May last, in this city, various farmer and labor organizations of thw state convened and organized tho Farmers' ami Confederation tor the mutual benefit ot agriculture and tabor; and, Whereas, By the instructions of this conference, we have pone into our respective organizations and tried to impress upon tllem tho importance of securing frlemliy legislation for axrktinuro and labor, believing thax tlie evus that are now weigh- ing so heavily upon us come from bad laws through a long series of years and, Whereas, we have worked hera long ta secure our pro rata share of nominations of several titikets voted for and tbroogh our zeal and energy, have succeed in not only BetruTitifr a majority of the members of the next assembly, but absolutely have the balance of power ou joint ballot trom our organization. Resolved, That vre have full confidence that elected tJirouph onr combined influence, and will stand firmly oy us and make a united elfort tor our gram! succoas hy electing a practical toi our United States senator tor tins great state.___________ THB PATRONS OP HUSBANDRY. Tire Election of Senators the People Advocated- MAJOISOST, "SVis., Ueceinber state grange of the Patrons of Husbandry began its annual session yesterday. Grand Master Carr, in- his address, advocated theelectionoi United States senator? by the people; prohibiting stock gambling; of the Conger lard and Paddock pure food bills, and government control of telegraph and express companies. He contended that a combination or trust had been formed by manufacturers on binding twine to raise the price of that article beyond the reach of poor men to purchase in Could ourleg'.slatnre do a wiser thing than pat- tern alter Minnesota, and establish a twine plant in our own state prison The state woulr De. no lo'ser, as it n ould be getting the same for its convict labor as it does now. THE Tlie CtttaB of- Florida Torn Out to Do Them Honor. BARTOW, Fla., December visiting delegates of the Nac.ona! Farmers' Alliance and Indnstrial Union were gathered up by the Oranse Be.t tram this morning from Tatpon Spnnjrs, riouclierland, Glearirater and St. Petersburg and from Louy Pier. At the lat- ter they embarked on tiio steamer Sadie for Tampa, The party numbered tiiil. Tainpa entertained them with a barbecue and drives to cigar factories at Ybor City, and a lunch at Tampa Bay hotel. From Tampa tbo course was nortnward by rail to Plant City, Lake- land, Bartow and Kiesismee, at each point flattering receptions being tendered the visi- tors Tomorrow the party will visit St. Cloud sugar mills. Polk 3Iay IHicome PnMie Printer. B-ALEIGH, X. C., Becsmber There is an imprcwcon hero "Colonel Ij> Polk, otTUe Farmer, will be chosen public printer if bo concludes to COLUMBIA, S.C., December Only one ballot was taken today for United States senator. John L. M. Irby received 63, M. U Bonald- son 43. Wade Hampton 43, J. J- Hcmphill 3, Robert Sma! Is 1. A GAIN OF EIGHT FOR IRBY. This is a gain of votes for, Irby, and one for KemphiH, and a loss of three votes for Hampton, two for Donaldson and three for Smalls. Irby gained all the votes lost by these candidates. He still lacks eighteen votes having a majority of the assembly on joint ballot. TILtMAN WILL BE BKOUGHT OUT. Bets are being made that Governor Tillman be tho next senator. The News and Courier names either Hampton ur Tiliman as moit likely to bo elected. Irby probably polled his full strength today. It is possible inat, in case Tillman is brought out as a dark iorse, Irby, knowing Tillraan opposed him, -will throw his strength to Hampton. Tlie News in Charleston. CSAKLKSTON, S. C., December Charleston is watching with abated breath and painful interest the Btmgele that is going on in Columbia over tho aenatorship. There are two Charleston delegates in Colum- bia will receive a warm reception at the hands of their constituency "when they return. Delegates Bisselland Sullivan may confidently conut upon being relegated to tho shades of private life upon the expiration of their terms of office. Bissell was expected to vote against Hampton, that is, since he went to Columbia, but Mr. Sullivan's friends, who -were numer- ous, are entirely at a loss to understand his vote. They say for him that be will come over to Hampton when the test cornea. GREAT EXCITEMENT PREVAILS. There never was BO much excitement as there is here over the election. Around the bulletin boards great throngs are collected at noon each day? and the crowd continues to linger until the last bulle- tin has been received. Aa in 1876. when wbote city rushed forward to pay its taxes and vote for Hampton as treasurer, BO now tho wholecity, with the exception of a lew reform- ers, is at his bacfc and hoping for his election. Tbe Attorney General in Trouble. Hon. y. J. Pope, the new attorney general of South Carolina, finds himself in about the most awkward position that aft attorney gen- eral was ever in. Yesterday he discharged a clerk in the judiciary department, but in his letter of dismissal testified touts worth and efficiency. L. B. Batler, the dismembered clerk, then as-kctl fof Genera! Pope's reasons. He replied that it was a duty he owed to the. state, as Butler bad voted for Haskell at the recent election, and that while he was in office no independent need apply. A lawyer today discovered in the general of the state that such a discharge for political reasons was punishable by a fine of not less than of more than and imprisonment not lesa than three or more than twelve months. It is probable that a warrant will be issued at once for the attorney general.______ FEES ECU TING THE JEWS. nieTBoranaum bearing their numbers in "Wash- brought ?200. A picture of Botty rmmted by the only portrait of iier known to be in exist- irtnt-knife and fork brought iJ13. Pearl buttosis from coat f 11 etch, oiid other otfered brought similar pr.ccs, AIt0gcther, 150 articles r.cre sold tonight, the total sum reaiire I being Tho sale lasted until ght. TEXAS IS AKOUSED The Russian Government Taking to Them Oat of tbe Country. ST. PETERSBURG, December government will probably promulgate new anti-Jewish law at tbe beginning of the com- ing year. One of tbe most important clauses of tho new measure forbids the selling, leading, or mortgaging to Jews of any real estate of the empire. Hitherto such a regulation has applied only to Poland. Another clause pro- vides that Jews shall be dispossessed of any real estate they may hold. In tho past the Jewish merchants, after paying the commercial tax of the first gmld for ten years, have been allowed to pur- chase real estate outside of the limits assigned to the Jewish populace. The new law cancels this privilege and compels them to sell all the real estate tnat they may have acquired. The Jewish artisans are also to be deprived of cer- tain rights, and are to be feept strictly within the limits assigned to the Jewish population. Repressive measures will be taken against Jews infringing the new law, as well as against Christians who may be found abetting them UBS TALKS. It "Will Be Time Enough to Name a ident fVlien the Occasion Is Reacted. RICHMOND, Vs., December eral Fitzbugh Lee, who, since bis retirement from the gubernatorial chair, has devoted his energies to the development of the business of the Bock- bridge Company, ie Uere tonight, fn flile spirits and perfect health. "1 am out of said the genial ex-gov- ernor. Being asked hisi preference lor tbe presidential nomination, two yeart hence, ne said: "That ia some distance off yet, and Ifthink Sen- ator Daniel struck tlie idea wlien be said that it be wisest let the issues of the campaign be more cifiajjy defined, and then select man best represents them, and to whoiD success is most certain to eorao." The ex-governor was a great friend of Cleve- land when the Litter was president, but he will nut Bay now whether he Mm ornot. Speak- inc of the chances of tlie senate passing the force bill, the general said- "It seems that the repub- lican senators, under the lead of Hoar, are trying to foiue that obnoxious measure upon the coun- try, notwithstun ding tho severe mbuke admin- iHWrf d at the recent election. In their attempt to revive tbe republican corpse, they remind me of the Indians who have danced to dc.ith in the west. Indeed, I think Senator Hoar and. Uis partv associates should now be called the political ghost dincers of the country." TSTE WASHINGTON SALE. Old Brlnsr Fifteen Dollars His Memorandum Boole Sells for 8760. PHiLiDKLPHiA, Pa., December sate of the valuable and extraordinary col- lection of effects of General George Washing- ton and of his executor and nephew, Lawrence Lewis, and grand nephew, Lorenzo Lewis, was begun here tonight by order of H. U. Lewis, administrator of the estate of Mrs. Lorenzo Lewis. The catalogue comprises several hundred articles, and tbe sale extend over three days. Tonight a gathering of collectors was present, and everything that bad A taint of Washington about it brought a big price. Among: these who made pur- chases were Mrs. Jadjre Woodward and Mrs. ng for the and ajrent for tire N.J., Wssii ngcon society; H. B. PHIMKU, of NOTV York: A. H. R. editor of The Ban Fian- cisco Examiner; M. Bronzonrol Boston; Ihr.E. H. Lamborn, of New YorS; Mr. Dowtou, of Mitchells, K. Y.; Walter Benjamin and James F. Sabin, of New York. A from General "WashinntOn to Lewis was bought by Mr. Aldnch lor .1310, after spirited bidding. Some purchaser the-highest nrceol the tor Hie last memorandum boote of Wnsh.iifirtoti, wliieh t'ie genera! sn, up to December a few ttajs le I, The le-Mcr f'' orating the K brongni i'JHft A ;inv itw tnewtraticitini borne Ste 0f lottery, by Waihington, and And TTill Spend a Million Bollars tlM World's Fair. HOUSTON, Tes., December the world's fair con-, entmn was called to order thin morning, there were delegates present, repre- senting t-very section of fiis great state from the Panhandle to the Gulf. In the assemblage were recognized the mayors of all tlie leading cities of the State, every interest had its exponent, even the newspaper man ou hand with a scheme to prive worth of free advertising if tlie delugates wouldiraise liiui a purso of All tbe preat dalios tbe southwest in vere repre- sented on the floor, and in every particular the convention wab j, representative Jtajor Scherfetis, of Hou-.ton, called Use jnecting order and addressed the convent o-i. After his address 3layor Ball, of Hunt'-vilJe, nominated. F. J. Hurby, of Fort Worth, temporary chairman, This motion was seconded by every mayor and the cliairma-i of cacli delegation, and he was unanimously elected. In his speech of acceptance, lie alluded to the areat possibilities of Texas, and asserted that Texas would, at tho Columbian exposition in 1S92, show tbe people of the world that Te3as could ise more rlian cotton snci hell. D. JJryan. of was elected per- manent secretary, and the usual committees were appointed. The temporary organization "vms made per- manent, and then the real work began. Tlie Dallas egation had come loaded. They wanted tuo stjite Slasomc te-nple moved to Dallas, and they denl.mcled that home of tho Texas world's fair convention be located there -ilfao. But the mow- ing under they got caused them to Unnk a Dakota blizzard had struck them. Resolutions of every and description were introduced, amoiur wliieh the most important thAt tno Texas lepciBlature be to appropriate OOJ lor the purpose the vast mdubtries of Texas represented. Ttie demand is tliat Texas have 3 separate build- ing,   FOOtS THE As tbe Story Following May Indicate to Reader. DOVER, Tenn.r December A. H. Munford opened the circuit court yesterday. One of the most important cases on the civil trial docket is ttiat of Henry Jackson vs. Kev. A. C. Stockard, of Waverly, Tenn., tn which the plaintiff alleges that the affections of his wife have been enticed away from him, and that she has been seduced and influenced by the defendant to abandon the plaintiff. Tho plaintiff seeks to recover damages. The defendant is a prominent minister in the Cumberland Presbyterian church, and it was while visiting the home of Mr. and Mrs. Jack- son, one or both of whom are members of hut flock, it is charged, he committed the crime. The plaintiff is about seventy years of age and the defendant ten years his junior, while Him. Jackson is Hot far from_ fifty___ THE UFCHC31CH DEFALCATION. The Deficit Now Amounts to Sixteen Thousand Collars. RALEIGH, N. C., December The shortage in the accounts of C. D. Upchurch, late clerk of the superior court of the county, is still tho topic of conversation here. The guardian trust funds book has been found, and shows a deficit of about It 'was thought yesterday that the statute did not provide for a criminal prose- cution, but prominent lavs yers noiv say that it does. The personal property of TJpchurch has been advertised for sale by the attorney for Colonel Shaffer, the chief bondsman, who has a mortgage on his residence. Smt will be entered at once on the official bond. It is cot thoogbt that Upcuureh will voluntarily return here. t Tfre Kesro Was Insolent. ATHfe-rs, Ga., Def ember pedal Mr. Henrv Lyle, of soy nf 1 Senator J. B.lijle, an indent no-re at that pace yestti-'.iv. Tl'C v.as au- bearable in bis nno Mr. pat a load of bnckshot iu ii.ii'- Tno wotitiii-s are not fatal. Oscar Thrasher, the nejrro shot is con- sidered a very character. I A negro mati ur.s run nvet bv the Covmgton and Macou train Lore today and both logs cut off. He will d'C oi tlie uouiida. A Clean Sweep. LTSV, Mass be;   

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