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Atlanta Constitution Newspaper Archive: December 7, 1890 - Page 4

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   Atlanta Constitution, The (Newspaper) - December 7, 1890, Atlanta, Georgia                               1HB GONSTmiXlOK; ATLANTA. GA. SUNDAY. DECEMBER 7, 189O. TWENTY-FOUR PAGES DY W. J. 8COTT. gallant that followed the ot Xenophon in his Cyrus their first glimpse of the ocean they with uiispeak- .ted. able rapture. It was only a lea's degree of joyousness that I felt when from tho deck of an ocean steamer I got my first distinct view of the broad and billowy Atlantic. I had read books of voyages by the scoro before ever I had known the need of a razor. Marryatt and Cooper were favorite novelists with me ia my boyhood. I still retain a lively remembrance of Long Tom Coftin, the typical boatswain, and of the striking adventures of the Red Rover. Not unfrequently I dreamed at nights of the "vasty ploughed by those mighty ships that "weave the continents to- gether." Such, indeed, was my boyish en- thusiasm that r have often thought that if I had been reared at a seaport. I might have Started in life as a stowaway, and not as a beardless student of Blaekstone. I gravely question if Byron was ever con- icious of a greater yearning "to lay his band upon old ocean's mauo and over wanton with its and yet, after aU, I was the veriest lubber in a half-dozen states. I had reached my majority before I bad ever snuffed tho salt sea gale, or glimpsed at a single brood of Mother Carey's chickens. During my first and only storm at sea I fully realized my utter niifitneas for a aea-faring life. How I longed for a foothold on terra Jirma. As I lay in my berth at midnight, and heard the stout ship with a heavy sea, and felt her quiver from, stem to stern. I recalled that I had tbe full sympathy of my brother passed midshipmen, and, iudeed, most of the utncers and all tlio crew." "I think, I continued, "that you took rmrt m the capture of California durine the Mexican war." h@ rejoined, was a lieutenant on board the frigate Savannah, the flagship of Commodore Slate, of the Pacific squadron. We landed at Monterey and in a solemn manner un- furled the.American flag, and by this imposing ceremony took possession of tho country. This, in the parlance of the lawyers, was a kind of wholesale livery of seizin. Of nourse tbe affair would have been farcical, but for the fact that we were backed by the whole power, military aud naval, of the gover- "Were you we asfcedi "with Commo- dore Perry when he negotiated the treaty of commerce with the He replied. "I was on board of the Susquenanna, one of the best ships pf our East Indian squadron. It wan an historical occasion, when we landed over marines on the const of Jeddo, one of the largest islands of the Japanese group. Hard by, with heavy Kttns bearing on the island, was our fleet composed of seven, of the best ships of the old navy. In a unique building elevated for the purpose. Commodore Perry, with his staff, met the representatives of the the brother of tlie sun, tho first cousin of tbe moon the near kiusman of innumerable stars, with a few comets thrown in for good measure. There was about that affair but little of the Tod-taplsui of Downing street. Our gallant Perry being a plain, blunt man. with an eye for business, it did not require much diplomatic palaver to break the seal of seclu- sion that had for so long a time isolated Japan from western civilization. The little Dutch trading port at .Nagasaki was lost sight of, and the best ports of the empire were henceforth open to American commerce. We begin now to reap the reward of that naval enterprise iu the vast increase of com- mercial exchanges and in the rapid growth of Christianity in a country where a half century BEDRIDDEN. Choking! Wheezing and sneezing! Coughing and snuiinfi! Aching, quaking'and shaking! Burning, rolling, tossing, and tho world go- ing around east and west, north and south all at the same time. Was ever a poor mortal so beset? The aver- age newspaper man is a man of sorrow and ac- quainted with grief, and when he does turn his toes up all liis sins step on him with all four feet. During the last few years my conscience and rao have been getting along pretty well to- gether. Even in my lucid intervals the still small voice didn't hare much to say. But during the last few my coun- trymen Haven't I caught it, though At first it seemed that a section of a Dakota blizzard had smote me under the fifth rib, and it took me up and shook me as a terrier would shake a rat. Then I had a taste of the fiery furnace seven times heated, but thauks to charitable nature, oblivion came kindly to my rescue then, and the physical pain was numbed, if not soothed, by delirium. But tbe poor, orphaned thougbtsof a be- wildered brain, knowing nothing better to do, retrace their steps and wander about among the beaten paths ot tlie past. Thus it_came about that I went over to the Union Woman's Christian Temperance at least twenty- convention ago children were taught to trample on tbe faith. the despised symbol of the Christian with vividness the ode of Horace in which he berates the folly of the man who first tempted the "treacherous sea." But somehow I still have a fancy for the legends of the forecastle, and have never lost interest in the marvels and mysteries of the deep sea. Men that have gono down "to the sea in ships" atill have a hold and sympathy-'' more and veneration. than Captain tetter Highland chieftain. It was he that fought the Alabama against the Kearsarge off the French port of Cher- bourg. A wooden ship against an the latter having the heavier battery and a larger crew. The contest was as unequal as if a light-weight pugilist should enter the with his bare knuckles to exchange blows with a heavy-weight with a mailed hand. How did it happen, I inquired of Captain Kelt, a few days ago, that you sailed out of port to tight against such odds? "Well, "he replied, "you must remember that we could not have 'remained much longer in Cherbourg without going into dock. This would have demoralized and probably dispersed our greatly embarrassed crew, in ami thus all our ur future efforts to cripple the commerce of the enemy. Another consideration which was not without weight was that the alternative offered us was either to fight the Kearsarge singly, or to delay and fight her and such rein- forcements as she was sure to receive iii a few days. But, besides, we did not know that she an armored ship until Admiral Semmes. who was in the rig-ing, noticed that neither our shells nor our solid shot made any impres- sion, but foil off into tho water. We did. it is true, plant a hundred-pound stiell in her stern post, and but for a defective fuso, that single shot might have disabled our enemy or sent her to the bottom. Once into the fight we must needs make the best possible of a bad sit- nation. "Did they firo on you, captain, after you hail hauled down yonr "Most assuredly, they poured several broadsides into Ala- bama after we had surrendered. A number of our gallant seaman wore killed and wounded by this murderous fire." "When it became evident that the Alabama was sinking, did they make an honest effort to save your men who had leaped overboard0" ''By no means. They did pick up a few, but tho loss of life would have heen much greater if it had not been for the rnous conduct of tho yacht, the Deer- What about the superstitions oE the sailor and tbe crossing of the line concerning which wo formerly read .so much in the old story- books of the nursery? replied the captain, "these aro passing away as the years go by. Old Neptune aniled with, his trident rarely comes up the ship's side as in former tbe consterna- tion of the fresh water sailors and the younger middies. The average sailor, however, has not yot over- come his aversion to leaving port on his dislike to carrying a dead body on ship- board." "What have you to say about the qualities of the American "Only the thoroughbred down- eastor is tho best seaman that sails the ocean. He is handy aud trusty, and haa little dread of storms or shells. Next to him, and in special directions superior to him, is the British tar who followed Nelson and Colling- wood in their great ocean victories. Compar- atively few sailors are of southern birth or blood, but some of the best men on tbe Sumier and Alabama were shipped at Charleston and Savannah. Not a few of the best naval officers in the yankee service during the late war were bouthern men. Of these we name Farragut and Hewitt. Indeed, the great body of our southern born naval officers, from Maryland to Texas, followed the leadership of Hollins and Raphael Semines, and that "old aea dog" Tatnall, who cast their lot with their native southland. The record they marie with the Merrimac, the Sumter, the Shenandoah, and, above all, with the peerless and ill-fated Alabama, is one of which their countrymen need not be ashamed. But the noble old sea-fighter must hurry off to Smmyside where his noble wife and only sou, the future admiral, await his coming. At the risk of incurring Captain Kail's dis- pleasure we reproduce, without his knowledge, a letter from bis old commander addressed to his godson, the little boy already referred to in tho foregoing sentence. It pre- sents Admiral Bemmes in a new rple, and shows that a great man may have on occasion the simplicity and gentleness of a little child. MOBILE, Ala., May 6, Dear Little Godson: I have received your little letter, together with your likeness. You have grown to be quite a little man since I saw you. You are no doubt acquiring to learn to spell and by and by you will be a "big boy" and go to school. I aui soriy to hear that your papa is not very well. Tell mamma to take good care of him. In tho meantime you must be a good little boy and do all papa aud you. so that you may grow up to be a man like your papa. Your affectionate godfather, R. SEMMES. five times in twenty-four hours, and I heard the speephes and the songs all again. AH day long I had lain tossing about in a kind of wild dream that was something more and something less than a dream; and sud- denly I heard the familiar strains "How firm a foundation Ye saints ol the Lord." And then tho organ pealed' forth. and with, a start I awoke to consciousness. It was the clock striking 12! There is something peculiar about that clock. When it strikes there is a a sort of low wailing sound like tho voice of some mortal in pain. If ever a clock had some secret sorrow that one has, because it cries, yes, cries when it strikes. Doctors are mysterious ani- DIDOS. mals. My doctor is, I know. He is a clever fellow, kind and OF affable, and generous (to a fault in tbe size of his doses.) DOCTORS I am very fond of him (when va milk in a sort of bottle with a cover to it. Along last Bummer the bottle would stand up alone, but as the autumn waned and the winter waxed, the bottle got feebler and feebler. At first he would lean it up against a pillar on the porch, but it has got so weak now that he has to lay it down tenderly. Sick as I was I laughed when I beard him lay it down to rest with a sigh, and he doubt- less dropped a tear when he thought how its step-mamma, the hydrant, missed it after the last pressure of its cold lips at parting. But my mind wanders. Sick people's minds are liable to do that, and even well people's, occasionally; and I know some whose minds, in infancy, wandered so far off that they could never find their way back. CDBIOCS Some curious things there are about aicfc folks. "Whatmakes AND a person's hair grow so fast on a sick bed? And toenails, PUZZLING. likewise And sick folks get scaly, and cross-grained. That's a sure sign of convalescence. So soon as I quarrel with my doctor he says "Well, you're all right. I'll not call again unless you need me." Angry? Oh. no. Ho knows that as soon as I get the Old Nick in me I'm out of danger. It isn't so with my is, I don't mean to say she's got the Old Nick in her at you understand what I mean. Convalescing! Ah, delicious! The children begin to torn somersaults in the ball, and the old lady begins to boss around, and I know I'm safe. Oh, bow sweetly the sun shines, and the winds of Indian summer run races with the crackling leaves. Away up yonder in the .p yoi glacid heavens airy cloudships are drifting ither and thither, and ever and anon I catch a fancied glimpse of the spirit voyagers sounding the azure depths with golden sun- beams as they glide along. Burn tbe pill boxes, smash tbe phials of wrath that I have been forced to empty. Down with the chills and the feven and the aches and the rigors. My compliments to you, Sir Doctor, and may ymr shadow never grow less. Thanks to you, my generous fellow workers, who have divided my burden among you. May your turn never come, but if it should, depend on me. Oh, life, joyous existence, cheerful povetty, An Awful Sore Limb flesh a Mass of Disease. Condition Hope- less. Cured by the Onticnra Remedies. For three years I was almost crippled with an awful sore leg from my taiee dowiv to my ankle tile skin was entirely gone, and the ,1esh was one mass of disease. Some physicians pronounced it incurable. It Lad diminished about on e-third the size of the other.and I was in a hopeless condition. After trying all kinds of remedies and spending hundreds of dollars, from which I pot no relief whatever, I was persuaded to try your CUTICUKA REMEDIES, and the result was as lollows After three days I noticed a decided change the better, and at the end of two months I was com- pletely cured. My flesh was purified, and the (which had been exposed for over a year) trot sound. The flesh began to grow, and today, and for nearly two years, my leg is as well as ever it was, sound in everv respect, and not a sipn of disease to he seen. REV. S. G. AHEIW.% Dubole, Dodge County, Ga. Bad Eczema Cured. The C UTICUKA RKMEDICS wrought a wonderfn cure on me. I was troubled greatly with a severe case of eczema, and after little or nit benefit from the treatment of some ot the leading specialists here, I procured a set ot" them and before they were all used the disease had lelt me. I recommend the CL TIC-UK A ap the best and surest cure for all diseases of the skin. JfELSOir CuAUBJSiti.AVS'E, Concord, Va. I welcome you all again. me gather up fond of I'm him, well.) My wife is too, but then ah e always splits his pills in half, opens tbe capsules and empties the bitterness out of them before she chews them up, and vows she can only swallow half a dose of his solu- tions at once. That is why she tolerates him so nicely when she's sick. But I ara a hero, and if he were to give me grape and cniimster I'd gulp them or burst. When I aui well the doctor a saint may be, but when I am ill the devil of a saint is he! My wife found that was I losing my grip, and some other grip was getting the uuderholt on me, aud she went for the doctor. He came, lie saw, be conquered. Not only did he triumph over the disease, but be used my poor remains to grace bis triumph. I was too sick to care much, but from the best I can remember, the following account of his didos is measurably accurate, or will answer all the purposes of newspaner accuracy. "Hello, what's the matter, old "Sick, doctor." Then ho took my fine Italian hand in his and felt of my wrist and looked at his watch. humph! see your tongue." With all my remaining strength I ran my truthful organ of English speech out until it touched my chin. "Um, humph! Been eating free lunch. Ought never to eat cheese with free lunch. Dead give-away. Common cheese used for that purpose gets intolthe pores of your tongue and will tell on you for days after. That'll do." Then he thumped me on the ribs where I hurt worst; laid his bead lovingly on my young and tender bosom, and when I thought great armfulls of the merry sunshine and press it to my heart and let me drink in copious drauehts of the sweet, free air! Throw open the windows. Sun the room. Tramp just as loud as you please in the hall, and bang the doors. It makes a fellow more generous and considerate to be ttatof his back awhile. It is a curious and queer thing to he sick, but a luxuriousj hot bath, a shave and a shine, a hair cut and a tooiiail trimming, and Kich- ard is himself again, just as bad as ever. (But ob, horrible thought! How shall I ever endure the skinning oft of those second- nature porous plasters MONTGOMERY M. FOLSOM. Mr. Barney's Senatorial EniTOii CONSTITUTION-; I ask apace in your columns for a few comments on the preamble and resolution? of "Mallory condemning Hon. John W. Burnev tor his vote for Geueral he was ho was simply Money in Mexican Coffee Raising, "If I were a young said a traveler in the writing room of the Grand Pacifie yester- day, "I would go down to the state of Chia- pas in Mexico and go into the coffee business. Chiapas is the most southerly of the Mexican states. It is right next to Guatemala, and the coffee th a is grown there is superb. "Fora long time the public domain of Mex- ico was uiisurveyed, and the government, in orderto necure tho survey, gave the state in Jwhic tho land was one-third, kept one-third, and gave the surveyors their choice of tho other third. The consequence is that the beat coffee lands are being rapidly taken up. A man can hitl buy good land at one dollar an acre. Ho can get it cleared off fortwo dollars g to direc- hnn-nr) wMr-h Ji, V Jciu get ic cleared oir lortwo dollars out0'Cherbourg ,o an acre, and in the meantime have a built of mahogany. I have several friends who live in mahogany houses. "Say you get 100 acres. The plants begin to bear from tho fourth or fifth year, In the meantime, as tlie young trees need shade, plant bananas or sugar cane between the rows of trees. You can make a good living by ban- ajisi culture. Yon need not make sugar from tho cane. -Tnst squeeze tho juice out. There ia a drink they make from it down there that you can sell readily. Your coffee trees will yield more and more every year. From 100 acres tho seventh year you ouarut to get a revenue "Yon can then sell your land for which yon paid for But if you are content an increase of a year from it, you witness the engagement. "Mr. Seward demanded of the English goverment the extradition of tlie rescued officers and crew, but Lord John Kussell met the demand with a prompt "Distinguished officers of tho British armv ind navy presented Admiral Semmes with a splendid sword as some compensation for the loss of the one that went don n with the Ala- bama. After a breathing spell, I said to Can- tain Kell: "What and where was your roughest experience with storms1'" The veteran thought a moment and an- Bwcred: "The worst storm I ever encountered was off the hanks of Newfoundland, where the Yankees' and Kanucks catch cod. In the east it have been called a typhoon. It bo- ionged to the same class of rotary storms that are named tornadoes, cyclones, etc., in differ- T llllulercHUIly. It so happened-, however, that the center or vortex of the storm passed over us and then we mare suddenly becalmed. When in this yortej the mercury in the barometer which just before the storm had sunk nearly to twenty-eight jnch.es, immediately to rise. Bnringthis lull Admiral Semmes ordered a storrn sail to bo set, aswe knew we would catch tho storm ina few minutes from the on posite quarter. It would .be impossible to con- vey an adequate idea of the furv of this tcr rible typhoon. Our mainyard" was snapped like a pipestern and our sails were rent 'into ribbons. "We estimated that this vast revolvine atmospheric cylinder had a radius of about 'h.e book you'd better hold on. height at which cofFe grows is from to feet above tho level of the sea, juat where the climate is one perpetual June, year in and year out. I was going into the coffee business myself, but a certain thing occurred which made it impossible for a time. But while I was making arrangements some coffee -dealers, acquaintances of mine, wanted to en- ter into a bargain with me to take all the cof- fee I could raise for any period of time I chose to name vv.witv captain, "that In Semmes's rokune, -Memoirs ot ServicS Afloat, you vote coice coKrt-inartialed for mutiny and disobedience to orders "hangB tho rank of passed' midshipman the war sloop. Albanv. held on Rood steady paying business, that's it. The biggest profits to he had in anything of that kind, though, is in vamilla Rrowiug. A man conkl rlear 3000 an acre each vear, but he'd- work himself to death. It doesn't require much skill in cultivation, but there's this about it; every bit of the plant is sweet Con- sequently, you've got to got up at all hours of tlie night to pick the bugs off the plant and Keep thorn away. "It's a good scheme to go down in that country with a roll of bills iu TOUT pocket some feast-day, The Mexicans go crazy plav- ingmonte. Suite them when they are broke and yon can buy their coffee plantation for a. song. They wUl kick themselves three month in i Perhitos Jio heaird my thoughts, for he up aim, looking at me attentively, ho au abstracted manlier: "Respiration's rather hyateridfcy, but the breathes strong enough for a dray horse iii his prime." "What's the matter -with me, I whispered faintly. "Some congestion .about your lungs. I'll %x. and taking from his pocket a pink pad ho began to write, just as I would if a police- man were giving me an item. Kipping off one sheet he filled out a second, and I ventured to ask: are you giving "Physic. Give him these according he said, turning-to my wife, and then bowed himself out, promising to call again during the day. Strange to say, he never comes near me when I'm well, but when I cefi down and am in no fix to entertain him. there is not a more constant caller alivo than he. When I know he was out of I asked to seo the little checks on tho pill factory that he had left me. One of them read something- like this: Ad. Ca.pt. VulRiis.......................... Alter Idem................................. Casus Belli xx Cum Gmno Satis.............. In Hoc Sifr. Vine................ AqtiaFura................. 3 lire, in water. riLLrnin BOLUS, M. D. The other was short, but not sweet- oh no not sweet! Cinch. Sulnli Galli Hittereo Nux Vmnic................ 3 hrs. with a fellow citizen, of the MHUO political faith, upon a question in which all have a common m- Berest, and I shall do so the more freely, because while I do pot know who compose the membeiehip of that alliance, those whom I do know aa mem- bers, I regard as just and fair-minded men. I read the preamble aud resolutions with sur- prise and repret. They are manifestly so harsh and unjust in the language emploved to express them, as to justify the conclusion that they were adopted hastily and without due consideration. The preamble declares, "When we select men to nil places of office and trust, and delegate to them power to act in our stead lor us; and when they, from anv motive -n liatever, net or vote contrary to onr will or .wish they thereby forfeit our con- fidence." Surely the citizens who compose Alal- lory alliance cannot, after calm reflection and more mature deliberation, reaffirm this decla- ration I It deprives a representative of all right of pri- vate judjrment, requires a surrender ol his con- science, subordinates his reasoning powers, roba him of his individuality and converts him into a mere machine, to be worked on any and all occa- sions in accordance with the "wUl or wish" of tlie people of a particular localibf without reference to the '.'will or wish" of peoplft of other sections ot the county. When a man forfeits tho confidence of his fel- Cuticura Resolvent The new Blood and Skin PuriHer, purest and best of Humor Remedies, cleanses the blood of all impurities and poisonous elements, and thus re- moves the cause, while CUTICLT.A, the preat skin Cure, and CrTiciniv SOAP, an exquisite Sian Purifier and Beantifier, clear the akin of every trace of disease. Hence the CCTKJUKA RKHEDIES cure every disease and humor of the skin, scalp, and blood, with loss of iiiir, irom pimples to scrofula. Sold everywhere. Price, CuricrRA, 50c: SOAP, 25c; Prepared by the POTTEB AND CHEMlG'Ak COKFORATIOS.', HOflton. for "How to Skin 64 pages, SO illustrations. aud_iw testimonials.______ blacIE-heads, red, ro-npjh, tiily skin cured by CITU'ITKA HOW MY BACK ACHESr Back Aclie, Kidney Fains, and Weak- ness, SoredGBB, Lameness, Strains, and Pain relieved in one minute by the Cuticura Anti-Pain Plaster. The jl onjyjtnstajitaneous pain-Killer plaster.______ tue wettppol. nr; m, 2. 4.__5._jj_p_____________ ABOVE ALL OTHERS OX j OUR CUSTOM JOHN M. MOOB 33 Peachtree St SEE OUR PRICJ TELEPHONE 41 Kxeelsior fATTTOTAtJ Dousltm are warranted, and every pair ban his name ana price stamped on civil law to visit such dire consequences upon any citizen of Georgia, whether in official or private giving him a fair bearing and a tun opportunity to make liis defense? The coii- L. DOUGLAS SHOE GENTLEMEN. Flqo Calf and Laced Waterproof Oraln. The excellence and wearing1 qualities of thti shoe cannot bo better shown than oy the strong endorse- ments or Its thousands of constant wearers. (aenninc Haml-scwed. an elegant and styllsb dress Sboe which commends Itself. SX-OO Hand-dewed A flno calf Sboa mf unequalled for stvle and durability. SO. SO Uoodrcar Welt Is too standard drcsj w Shoe, at a popular price. SO. CO Shot? Is especially adapted w for railroad men. farmers, etc.' AH made In Congress, Button and Lace. stitution and U a'ltee this right to Me, ignorant person of Georgia 'niar- tbe most hun- ithin her borders ............XXS5X ...........XXXX ..........Ad. Inf. u BoLrs, M. shortly-before our' revolution arc troubles began. I refusod'to oBe- 3 I esteemed 'SPAPER my country. The larger dishes consist of an immense plateau and center piece, end pieces, caudela- bruma, wine-coolers and pitchers. In the design is represented fruit of-an description, together with the unicorn and lion in repousse work. Mra. Astor uses a white linen table-cloth of the finest teiture, made especially for her, with a white IMO border showing a lining of pink satin. Her always decorated with Glorie de Paris roses, their exqnisito shade of pink matching cx- T groaned. "What's the matter, I moaned. I took his medicine. Yes, I MELANCHOLY lay a wake all night, not through fidelity, but simple dread. Tlie AND taste of one dose was in my mouth when I swallowed tbe MUSINGS, alternate pill. And didn't I hear bv the dawn's early light, tho drums of the Salvation Army, the Bohemian band and Barnum's calliope, in my ears a-booming! But those pills and potions were the last feathers that broke the fever's back, and in my heart I thanked Dr. Bolus, even if be did have me plastered all over until I resembled "one of those little Texas bronchos that you have to tie a knot in. his tail to keep him from walking through tho bead stall, with a great big cowboy, saddle, blankets bearskin and all swathed about his lumbar regions. I took that medicine all'.np.andlicked the spoon, and jnac in the nick of time I received a fresh invoice of drugs of a new sort. But I am spirited, and I waded into them with set teeth and closed eves. Oh, the weary hours that followed I AH day long I could hear the restless roar of busy life about surges of life beating about the desert island of my confinement. The boom of the distant clock telling the slow hours; the jingle of engine bells: the shrieks of warning All these and more could I hear, and I felt like a poor dismantled hulk half submerged in a dead eddy, while all tbe white-winged ships were passing and repassing on the tree waters these qualities, to represent tbe whole people ot the county, is, within two days after tlie election ol united States senator, and while ho n htill in Atlanta, at the pofat of duty, convicted and con- demned without the form of trial or an op- portunity to bpcak a single word in his own The restriction of tlie accountability of a repre- sentative) to a particular class of citizens is more distinctly iiJid strongly stated when, after ex- pressing their own Indignation against Mr Uur- ney, these members of Mallory alliance call upon "all othei alliances tbrougbouc the state to give public expression to their indignation in every ease in which a brother allianreman has cast his vote contrary to tlie wishes and direction of ais brethren." Only albaiicemen are spoken of as brethren, therefore an alhanoeinan, nominated and elected to tlie legislature as a. demo- cratic candidate, is unuer obligation ti> respect tlie "wishes and direction" of albancumen mailer how largely in the majority tlicnoii-alliance democrats inaybeiu bis county. Is this democracy? It is not the genuine, pure, unadulterated com bearing the impress of Jeflerbon. Jackson, Calhowt. Thurman ami dev- It is certainly a f-purious, counterfeit new ii-sue, that will not pass current with southern democrats. TJiese remarks are of general applica- tion. A brief r.'terence to the lacts connected Mr. ney's candidacy and Pleutior will present in a still stronger hplit the injustice" done to him. When be was selected by the alliance as a can- didate for nomination in the primary election or- dered by tbe "democratic executive committee" ot the county, ho said m substance (this letter la not accessible) that it called upon to become tbe candidate of the alliance only, he would promptly decline the it was to become a can- didate for nomination by the democratic party of the county, be saw no reason to refuse the use of Ilia name. His position was unequivocal and clearly understood; he would he the candidate of the democratic party, not of a part of it only He was nominated by a flattprmc ma- jority, receiving tbe support of aHiancemen and non-all lancemen, and was elected without on- position. In his letter of acceptance, he express noble, manly, patriotic, btatef-man-Iike ments, have been moit favorably received felnco Introduced ana the recent Improvements malco them superior to any shoes sold at these prices. Ask. your Dealer, and If BO cannot supply you send direct to factory enclosing odTertised price, or a postal for order blanks. W. IMH'GI.AH. Brockton, Itlaai. Chamberlin, Johnson Co., No- GG and fiS Whitehall street, Atlanta, octS d4m wed fri sup n a m IF YOU WANT THE BEST ASK FOR THE Company 47DEATORSH1 Shirts .._ Cuffs, per Nightshirts.............................. Undershirts................. Drawers.................... Socks, per pair.............................. Silk Handkerchiefs Pants......................................] Aprons Vests................................i Towels....................................., Shirts (new for tbe Sheets................................... Slips............................. Lace Curtains, per pair.......... Special rates for Hotel and Linens. reliable, line work. Ai at every town. "Write for prices utdj Hot and Cold Baths in connecttafc Best Quality, Correct Styles. Perfect Fitting, Best Linen. creditable alike to iis head and his heart ollowing language "I shall be attentive to I   IZTtE, etc. They regulate the Boirell and provost Constipation cad Files. The smallest and easiest to take Only one pill a i3ose. Purely vegetable. Price 25 cents. immcrga Prcp-u, itev PROFESSIONAL C1EM riPIUM HABIT CURED OB SO M Address John W Xelma, Si'A Bmd J lanta, Gtu, or Dr. J. A. Xelmfi, SmyratCi mar22-dlyr._______________Solas DR. JULIAN P. THOMAS, SPECLUOT, OF THE S3 Cliamberlln Joluiaon building, TTMttt! Atlanta, Ga. Office noura from 9 to B Koojii7. l ATTOBNBTa Howard E. W. Palmer. Cbas. A. Head, READ BRAXDOK. ATTOIlNErS AT U South Uroad Street _ IO-3-d6m-top col HUGH V. WASHINGTON. ATTORNEY AT LAW, MACfB Commercial claims, damages and claims given careful attention In ttaBMflj-' States courts. W. SOUNTREE, COU 70 and 71 Gate City Bank Building, Telephone 1030. Georgia reportt an d_ei changed.__1 ATTORNEYS TT A. Haimnond, Jr., Dcp osltiuns inJFuIton cooar AT J. T. A, 1 11. ATTORNEY lixjoma Nos. -U ai Win. A. Hay-rood. HamflWa TTAYGOOD DOUGLAS, Office IT r Feachtreo st. TiDUUXD ATTORNEY AND COOKSZLOB.iIi; So. 55 WJiitehall street. phone C-I2. T> A; Rooms and Telephone H. C. Johnson. not is entirely immaterial. John did or Bur ney put the whole county upon notice that unless directed by his constituents, includ as everybody knows, iion-allianeemen as well ine to ho called upon to aiafce the speech y me tnat was never and down and to in the b'0' We don't know yet. Ethel and I want TCIZSncl1' bat our George fa on his college foot-ball team, and we can't tell m whether we shall he in monnunc thia year or _ iMr off tbe Mod. From The Kew York Star. QThe Bnsmesa Men's Cycling Cl joj-ed a ran to Plainneld on r, rt- ni.-n .11 iTie nn Hi. (X. J. Hammond's old office.) bama street. ____ _ T HSUEOK DRIVER ARCHITECTS. No. second floor In old T1DKUXD 0. LLSn ARCHITECT. Whitehall LB. VVHEELEK T. ATLASti, UHice fourth Ooor corner WMtehall and Hunter CIVIL ENGEiBBBS E. M. Hall. James E. Bin. TTALI. BKOTHEES. CIVIL. AND MDTIWJ Koom No. 63, Gate City Atlanta, Ga, General sarreytngjOTT quarries, water powers, water Uon superintended- ___ _ PETER LYNCI are the safest, surest and speediest vegetable rem- edy m the world (or all diseases of the Stomach and layer. They clean tbe linings of Stomach and Bowels. Reduce congestion ip all the organs. Heal irritated and excited parts. Promote healthy action and sweet secretions. Correct the bUe and cure biliousness. Make pure blood and give it free flow. Thus send nutriment to every part. Tor Sale Ijy Dmiori-rt. Price. 35 ets. perboi; o? Whitehall and 7 DEALEB IX CIsars, Tobaccoj, Snuff, CIDJSE. ALE. PORTER, IJEEE. Fine Wines, Wnlakies and J in ttus line. Also Guns, and other Ammunitions. Orchard, Herds and T Kuta Seven Top. White and Yellow Glo German, Sweet and other 1 German Kale and other Fall, Seede. Fresh and Genuine. Empty half barrels NEWSPAPER   

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