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   Atlanta Constitution, The (Newspaper) - September 24, 1890, Atlanta, Georgia                               PUBLICANS STEAL RIOTOUS DAY YESTERDAY. th CoroIIna Member lorned Out la -even Three Negroes TSoxr, Seats in tlio House. t L 3B2SGTON, September v a hard and bitter fight, lasting two the Virginia contested election case K t ided today. MA was unseated 1 o negro Lang-.ton sworn in. 1 promised yester Jay to have a repob' quorum horo today, r.nd his promise was ed. tie session opened with only Mr. O'Forrall ao democratic sulo, Judge Crisp yet bain. Sued tohis rooiii. On tlie first vote to ap- ve the journal Friday, Keed as to count a quorum, and a call of the was crd-ned. During the call three- or t republicans came in, and wero greeted Tnth great applaute. "When Milliken, of came in tho applause that greeted him 13 deafening, for he was tho last man needed make a quorum. Immediately tho U was dispensed with, the journals of Sab- Jay and Monday wero approved, and the, jte on ousting Mr. Tenable was taken. The vote stood 151 to one, and Hoed counted fourteen more as present, enough to make a quorum. Brown and "Waddill, the two Vir- "inia republicans, refosed ta vote at as that Langston was not elected. They were, however, counted to make a quorum. Choadle, of Indiana, was the only jepublican who voted against seating the negro. However, there were twelve besides Keodwbo refused to vpte at all. TEE NEGRO SWOBS IN. Upon the announcement ot the vote, of "Wisconsin, walked down the main aisle with tho negro, Ijftngston, on his arm. Lansston js a bright mulatto, with a loll beard, 13 about fifty years of age. dresses -stylishly and holds himself above the, average negro on account of the white blood in his veins. He is an agitator, and is thoroughly detested by tho. people of Virginia. 'VThen Reed administered the oath a mighty low! went up from the public gallery, which is crowded with negroes. They shook their "ooly heads, stamped their feet and howled until it seemed the roof would go off. Tho republicans on the floor joined them, and there was a genuine negro and republican jollifica- tion. Joe Cannon rushed up to the negro, grasped hand, patted him on the back and 30med to want to kiss him with his vulgar outh. Ho-never, he desisted, and the many republican members congratulated the >gro for -n horn, they had stolen a seat. AXOTHSB OUTRAGE PDEPETBATBD. i.et had not been restored when John- u. Kowell rushed to the front and called c to Miller-Elliots contested election case i the Beaufort-district jjf-Soutb, I -as the second negro case on." the -amme. Colonel Elliott was elected O5 majority, but that made no difference th tho republicans. Not a dozen of them on the floor knew anything whatever about tbe case. But they were in for stealing anything they could find, and without a mo- ment's debate the previous question was or- dered. Mr. Kcrr, of Iowa, one of the few republi- cans who has a semblance of honesty in his makeup, asked that the case be explained in that he and others might know upon what they were voting, but Keed nodded to "Eowell and Kowell refused to allow the reppct to be read or say anything about the case. He it was enough that tho republicans -of the committee had decided that Miller, the negro, was entitled to the seat. Reed put the question at once and 'refused to allow an aye and no vote, but counted a quorum, and in just seven minntea after the case was called, Colonel Elliott was unseated and the negro, Miller, declared by the republicans as entitled to the i 6 eat. MILLER "WAS NOT THESE. Then everybody looked for Miller, to .swear lim in, but the negro could not be found. He, is down in South Carolina, but was tele- graphed to, and will be sworn in as soon, as he arrives. The unseating of Colonel Elliott iras, perhaps, the greatest outrage ever trated in a legislative body. He was unseated a hearing. He was not even allowed to say a word in his own favor, nor was any one al'oired to say anything; for him. Over 130 of the republicans voted to unseat him. without knowing anything about the case. Not one of them could tell you a single point made on either side in tho committee. In fact, they knew absolutely nothing about it. They simply followed Keed like so many sheep "Would follow a hell wether. This makes three negro members of the touseand the republicans have enough to atiafy them for the present. Cheatham and Ciller, the negroes from the two Carolinas, bright mulattoes, but both are quiet and 11 give the republicans no trouble. How- jer, it is different with JLangston- He ia one the talking kind, and will probably attempt make a speech or lead before the week is ted. Keed will either have to set upon him, to speak, in the beginning or the repablic- 3 will soon be sorry that they gave him a THE DEMOCRATIC SITUATION'. The democrats are very mad tonight because art refused to recognize Mr. s when he demanded a division on_ the '1 vote to seat Langston. Many of the "3 now say that if the republicans intend .sact any more business this-sessien they qo it with a quorum of their own men. leading democrats are advocating the idea! talcing the. republicans get here to pass the tariff bill. As a{ Tor more republicans left town'tonight, T3 probably take them three weeks to gefij 3' P quorum, and the democrats think it a; 'ea to force them to do this. Under this ed plan, all the democrats, except a half; men who represent solid democratic f can go to their homes ftnd .enter campaigns, while the few democrats remain can prevent legislation bout the presence of a republican quorum, ay this means the republican members will p to remain here and neglect their cam- Ji is at home. This could bo kept up until the November elections, andmunydemc- believe that it would make the next surely democratic. It has, however, not lecided upon yet. The democrats will j Ty caucus some time tomorrow, and then programme will be mapped out. THE FILIBUSTERING northern democrats are opposed against tho tariff biH are almost solid for it. They-want to give the republicans a dose, pf tb.eir own medicine, and keep them, here- for a month or two This adjournment depends upon the demo- cratic programme. they decide mot bitter any more, congress will, adjourn next .weok, filibuster, then congas wjll -be in session until November, and per- haps- Ifiter. The republicans are very much annoyed at the talk of filibustering. They, say it win be a vioJatiou of the deal made be-i tiycen Senator Quay and Senator Gorman, by which the force laU was allowed to gp over until next session. DISTRICT COXTNT. Tho census oiHco completed another Georg'a census d.strlct today. Itia the first this'cirne. The complete count of the, state will be concluded this Tha tirst distiict shortra up as follows: COUNTI30S. Ber-ien Bij.in Uotloch CauHicn Cliartton.. Cliattuuu Clinch Cyflco Irwm Johnson Laureni Libortv JLowiiues Alclntot.il Alont jcry Fierce Pulaela Pcrevcn Tntnall TelEair Ware IVaj ne Total 1890. 1889. Incr. 10.GU3) 3.0G' G.12U j 3.C06 M06 2.2SS 220 1315 MS 4.G38 03.143 Brunswick 11.053JS5.U9 lacr. Per Increase 41.41 per cent. 'Decrease. THK LARD The eompomid lard bill was finally hilled, eo far as this soision is concerned, today. It was to be taken up in the senate committee on agriculture, but none of the mem- bers were present, and consequently the bill vi lib not considered. Tbis throws it over until next lutho man of business.mquy believe it can be thrown out and killed _____ 3B. W. B. ST2XJC, Tlie ConforooB on tho Tariff Bill Mave Hot Yet Agreed. September The republi- can conferees on the tariff bill were in session this morning two hours before noon. Alter they had separated it waa said there no farther progiess to report. The prin- cipal items of difference are those that have been obstacleslike mountain peatts in the %vay of agreement from the beginning sugar, bin-d- ing twino, metals and glassware. -The key to tho whole situation ia the sugar schedule. Were an agreement reached on that, Jests than, 'five minutes w-ould bo settle.., allr other tjuestJons. It is expected, "by! confarees that an agreement wlU reached before 12 o'clock tonight, while on the senate side there IB a feeling that the situ- ation ia not quite so favorable as it was last vfeek. After an- agreement is it will require- at least a day for the clerks to prepare tho report for presentation to the two houses, so that it probably will not go into the house before Thursday at the earliest. The republican conference took a respite from their labois tonight for the first time in several days. The situation is now such that no good, it is thought, can come of talking the matter over any further. The conferees have had turned upon them all the light that can be diffused upon the only -items in the bill now sugar and binding and when they adjourned at G o'clock this afternoon it was 'deemed best to leave each man alone to think the situation over in the hope that by tomorrow morning one side or tlie other will show a disposition to yield- Those in favor of a duty on binding twine have gone a good ways, they say, in consent- ing to a very much lower duty than the present rate of cents aud they now think it is time for tho free binding twine men to abate something, at least, of tbelr demands. An earnest effort in this direction i? making to- night by some of the conferees and other leaders who are endeavoring to secure the ad- hesion of western senators to with a small duty left on binding twine, The on which the metal and, glassware schedules, which have been the cause of much contention, .were settled tonight; waglhat of a compromise.. The duties on steel rails and structural Iron remain as in house tfill, and the duty on steel billets is fixed at .a rate lower than provided for by the house, but higher than fixed by the senate. These were three of tho pxincjpal items in this schedule in dispute. The rates fixed on ttther items in the schedule cannot be given, but they are very generally lower than the house and higher than senate This last statement applies also to the glassware sched- ule, on which there were a great many differ- ences in rates between the two branches of congress. The tobacco clauses of Internal revenue sec- tion of bill remain as fixed by house, with .ex- ception that tax on tobacco and snuff is re- duced '2 cents instead cents, making the rate provided by the bill 6 cents a pound. May 1st is fixed as the period when the tobacco clauses' of the measure shall go into effect. Special licenses on -dealers are abolished, as provided for by houae. Clerks to the conference committee are en- gaged in preparing the conference report and making up the bill in accordance with the changes madeirt the conference, so as to have the report ready for; submission to the house soon after an agreement isr reached upon sugar and binding twipe. _ Faddaclc Cannot Get His Committee Confirmation. WASHINGTON, September. 23-T7-A mjeetipg of the senate committee on agriculture was called for today to consider, the, Couger compound lard hill, and repori It as. a substitute for the Paddock pure which baa a place on the caucus calendar of business in the senate. The absence of democratic members of the committee who were opposed to taking any action upon the lard bill, and of Ifr.McMilJan, who is in Michigan, made aquorum impossible, so that nothing was- done- Chairman Pad- dock will make another, effort to get a tof the committee in a day or ,UJs, of JTosas, attend the conferences on tho tariff, bill, has brien ex- cused and the- vacancy- BO occaa.oned was to- day filled by the appointment by the speaker of Mr. Tarnor, of Georgia. Tho executive session of the senate today AS confined to the consideration of the nomi- nation of George B. Maney, of Tennessee, to be minister to Uruguay and .Paraguay. After a lull discussion the favorable report of the committee on foreign relations was concurred in on i yea and nay vote by two-thirds rof the senators present. The nomination of Mr. Money was one of the first Eeatjtotbe- senate at the present session of congress, hat it has been held up raitil now -hy charges uaado against him relating to his personal habits." jpopolatlon of Georgia Cttlea. September 23. The census bureau announces the popttjation of Bruns- wick, Ga.f aa increase or 190.65 per cent; Savannah, Ga., increase or 33i9ff per HE IS HEALTHY EX-PJRESIPENT CLEVEUVRD And Says Ho Kevor Enjoyed Better Health t He.Ewjoyea His cntjon and We September A sipry has .appeared in various papers about ex-Bresi- dent -Cleveland's physical and, mental healtlu in which it ia stated that the ex-president was a sick man; that he spent his dajs in moody silence, and grow so lethargic during his vacation that his favorite pastime of Halting was relinquished, and during the day he spent most ol his time in sleep. Tha symptoms, the story alarmed Mr. Cleve- land's friends, and no one more than himself. Mr. Cle-voland, was seen by a reporter today in his law ofiice in "William street. On being1 shown the story, he read it through, and then exclaimed "Howabsurd that story is! I really have no patience to deny all these statements. They arq untrue, every one of them. Don't you thick I look pretty well? I never felt better in my }ife, J spent an excellent vacation and during the time I was at Marion I fished every day. It is rather peculiar that the story! should come Irom Philadelphia, for some of my friends from that city accompanied, me on my fishing trip. I have taken us much exercise, as ever I did, and have not the slightest r son to complain of physical or mental illness., I returned to New York on Friday and came dpwn to my office on Monday morjiingj My time hog been spent since in clearing up correspondence that has accumulated on my desk, aud 1 flatter myself that I- have put in two pretty good days' work. I think I have said everything necessary to confute that story." Mr. Cleveland looks quite well, and is evi- dently jaa vigorous as before he started on his vocation. Causes Discussion In the IHJssis- aippl Convention. conven- tion struck another snag today, but for which, the suffrage question would have been finally disposed of before the hour of adjournment. Everything proceeded smoothly until section 7 the article on tho of county officers was reached. This sectiou provided that a general election shall be held on tho firsfcTuesday after the first Monday in Novem- ber, and every four, years thereafter, pro- vided the. day of such election may bo changed by law. The terms of all elective officers, ex- cept members of tbo legislature, are extended so as to expire on tne nrst in January, 1804. Under the operation of this auction all county officers whose terms expire January, 1SQ2, are granted two years additional term of otfica without the necessity an election by the people. As soon-aa tho section was read, amend' ments and substitutes bogon to pour in and1 an animated discussion followed- Thosawho opposed contended that right to usurp, the pow-er: of the people in. whom. was. nested the right to elect county The side contended, that was eminently right and proper for the convention to extend the terms of the present incumbents of oflicera so as to make them con- form to the now constitution, which provides for an election In November, 1893. The peo- ple would not object because they were natur- ally averse to frequent elections and would cheerfully support a scheme to prevent them. Those who wera in office now were placed there by tho people and the convention would only be ratifying their choice. After a protracted debate, a substitute hostile to the interests and purpose of the section was tabled by a vote of 62 to 57; where- upon the at 6 o'clock, p. in., ad- journed till tomorrow. MHXS IK Opens the Democratic Tho Great RACINE, Wis., September 23. Roger Q. Mills opened the democratic campaign in this city last night and addressed a large audience atj Lake Side rink. Ho devoted considerable attontiop. to the question of compulsory edu- cation and the Beimet law. He said that a man had no right to put his hand on his mouth and prescribe what he should eat or drink. This is one of the rights granted in the con- stitution. A man was responsible for his own actions and not for any one else. He charged .most. of the members of the- republican party in favor of prohibition and the established church and all other forms of paternalism. In closing, he spoke of the ef- fects of tho tariff on the farming community, and arguedlmfavorofopening'our markets and having reciprocated by allow- ing our products to go into all markets of the world unhampered. This, he thought, would stimulate, trade in pur country, would give a boom to transportation, and all forms of in- dustry would feel the effects. AUUIASPOE MAKES1 GEEKMS, .And the Integrity! of the Hprih Carolina Democracy is Assured. CHARLOTTE, K. C., September 23. [Spe- For some time past 'there has existed throughout our state a feeling among alliance democrats that fi nurtured would have catised the death of Vance for the senate, and would in aH probability, caused dissentions_that. would "have been very detrimental to tho democratic party in the coming election, but the alliance has, seen that this difference must; not eSiat, and it was plainly visible to that order the harm that would he'fall their chosen .party. With their usual good judgment they have put far frcun, them, this obstruction, and today harmony reigns supreme. The democracy is more united than ever befcre, and this year promises to be oneof the most victorious one in the hiqtpry of JTorth Snbfcraasnry, Scheme. September A epe- ciatfrom Bowlins Green, tbatPres- Orwin, of the jfornaera' Alliance of Kentucky ,-and editor of the- official orgaa-ef .the Kentucky published there, bas come out boldly against the snbtrcasary much comment by BO doing. Democratic of that, section are upholding and it has- made hi pa more popular than ever. He had previously been quoted as Republican Nominee. DKMOPOMS, Ala., September The first congressional district republican con- vention of Alabama nominated. Kev. A, "Warner, colored, for and endorsed Harrison. F. H. Thraet bolted the conven- _ New TTorlt's State Democratic Committee- NEW YOSK, Septemher23. The democratic state committee luet this morning at the Hoff- man house, all the -members being present but two, who were represented by proxies. The committee unanimously renommated Judge Kobert Earl for the" court of. appeals. Democrats Coming In. [Special.] AN ALABAMA UESPEKADO by a Detective in the, Mountains Delegates to the state convention of tbe Young Men's Democratic Clubs arrived on, every tram today. Among them many prominent men- The convention will decided success. niVj.Ala., September Key, a has. defied the Ta vs ot the state and successfully .evaded ofl.< for fifteen, 'years, was-captured nr his hiding place, in the naoun- -.ainatn JXViTfcer He is.wanted tot araoiif bntjJary, jaumerous cases of horse and Battle stealing, and .several murderous assaults. Key for years has carried, on tbe business of stealing and sheep, driving them1 aud spiling them- He varied xrioootoiiy of the business occa- sionally by burglary and arson, and found in shooting oificerg who attempted aijroat him. He was located several days ago a detective who secured the as- sistance of Sheriff Gwin, of Hale county. The two laidt a trap for tho, and captured him without trouble. .Key has been engaged in many desperate and bloody battles with oSicers, and was once riddled with bullets, but reaehhis mountain, retreat, where he recovered from his wouridsl He committed many crimes in Mississippi, aa 'well as in She 3Uo and Her Son Edwin Silled Hurley Kussell. MQNTICKLLO, 111., September 23. Sheriff George Miller and Dr. J.TK Knatt took Mrs. Ann Halden and Edwin Holdeu to the, penitentiary at Jpliet. Mrs. Holdcn has: made a. confession that it waa she and her aonEdwan that killed Harley Kussell. In Purling with her son Calvin, who is sentenced to hang at the jail, he gathered, his mother around the nock, and on his knees lrn.plor.ed her to tell who it was- that killed Hatley Eussell, and not to let-liim hang, for she alone could tell the true story. On the way to Joliet she confessed to Dr. J. D.i Knott that she held the horse, and that tier son -Edwin Holden did the shooting. She said Caiviit Holdcn knew nothing of it until it was, done. She admitted that she had made threats, against Harley Russell in the presence of Albert but that was all Dunham kne-w about the killing until it was done.i trouble with Harley Kussell ran back for four years. She admits haying got tfhe Honseljnen revolver. the reason she did not tell who. reserve order. At the National League in Dublin, yesterday, Mr. Healy, In his speech, said that if any tenants submitted to the they wera traitors to their fellow-countrymen. By the derailing of a train near Florence, Italy, yesterday, five persons were killed and twenty in- ured. King Humbert anii Queen Margaret wera iboufi to start for the ut on learning of the lisaster, they immediate 7 i Deeded of Accident, -where t; of the in j UK a, INEWSPAPERf VSFAPERf   

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