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   Atlanta Constitution, The (Newspaper) - September 20, 1890, Atlanta, Georgia                               VOL. XXII ATLANTA, GA., SATURDAY. MORNING, SEPTEMBER 20, PAGES. PRICE FIVE CENTS. TH! eEIT OF CEISP THE REPVRZ.ICAifS FOR OTHER DAY. "SPLAYS ADMIRABLE LEADERSHIP --after Keed Outwitted at Every in tlie Act of Kalsfl Cottnt- Today. of the American congress, took Jce'onthe floor of the house today. The democrats again came out as victors IT: is, Judge Crisp and Mr. came were the only democrats present, am the fight was between Judge Crisp and his Mr. O'Ferrall, on the one hand and 1GO republicans .ind Tom Reed on the other. It was a great victory for tho demo- crats aad the question ii being asked tonight rf two'democrats can whip 1130 republicans iowmany democrats should it talte to whip the entire republican party? THE QURSIIDS AT ISSUE. "-The battle today was hko that of yesterday, over the Virginia contested election case of Venablevs. Laiigston. "Whan the house met there were five demo- crats and llK) republicans on the floor. Keetl immediately proceeded to count, and by count- ing himself nrst, middle and last, announced IKi members, a quorum, and the journal was read. Then Judge Crisp wanted to know why it tbe speaker's decision oft the point of order he raised yesterday was not in tho jour- nal, and moved to incorporate it. Tho motion of course, voted down by the republicans The speaker was, however, unable to count "but 164 members this time, two democrats "having retired, but he announced tha't there a quorum of the present members, as three ha-1 recently died and one had been un- seated. Jfldgo Crisp then questioned the accuracy cf Heed's count, and asked for tellers. Keec refused them, but shortly afterwards, at the request of McKinley, who wanted to be fair, complied. DETECTED FALSEHOOD. Tnder tho count by the tellers only Ifc members, including the speaker, could fee riuiiil, and Judge Crisp made a very stron; against the speaker's decision thai ici was a quorum, An hour was consumed in this argument by 10 republicans and Judge Crisp. Tlie irgument was so strong that Beet Ms, own decision, but said it was noi Keed was completely tattled at his .tempts to count a quorum (being so dias- for the test by tellers showed that he L-id counted decidedly wrong. His ruling IGo was a quorum was decidedly fair on 1's part, but was done' to retrieve wliat ho lost by erroneous counts. There wero of the house and Jvote after vote for hours. Reed would count a quorum it would disappear, and ho.couldn't it On tho calls of the Iiottse a IK; wonld appear, btit when the call was jnietl with there would bo 110 quorum. Uibt Keed called all his lieutenants ,nd him. A long conference ensued, and f before 5 o'clock the republicans gave up o and adjourned. 11 they tan get a quorum, however, it tomorrow. There v.ero iraiij amusing incidents during Iiedaj -lo'iy democratic members were out Ttlie and occasionally one of them ,-cnld jeep in. Keed saw Judge Holman, of nHiau.i, take a peep, and called him, iid great republican laughter. Just be- uro the republicans gave up the fight, lacy made a proposition to Judge Crisp that if be would them to vote on this case and cnseat V enable, they would take up no more ontaste-l th "3 suasion. Jacge Crisp quickly spurned the proposi- ;on, with the statement that he was making ia fight for the democrats on principle, and cuatlic tvou'd enter into no dicker whatsoever. One sltle or tho other must fall. Reed's temper rose at this refusal, and he "oanted a quorum, but couldn't prove it and we up. REED IS MAD. Toiiight "Reed mm a perfect fury. He is cnrstng aad sv.eai.ng wildly, and declares he U boycott all absent republicans who are not re tomorrow. Dnntig; the proceedings today, while the eniocratic s.de practically deserted, ily Judge "Crisp nnd Mr. O'Forrall sing present, Keed filled all the republican icant seats with pages and doorkeepers and an instantaneous photograph taken of the ise. The photographer was in tho gallery. Mill bo lithographed and labeled be Democrats Obstructing Public Busi- "s-" In this shape they will be distributed oadcast as campaign documents. THE WINDOW BARRED. faring tho recent filibustering the demo- 's have beon. getting out into the corridors agh a window in tho barber shop. Today bad this closed and a heavy padlock and "nt put on it. He, however, did not dare cclc any of the doors, for the democrats re heavily shod, and the Texas men there to kick them down. By tho Colonel Kilgoro, of Texas, who yesterday "3 down one of the doors, received tele- -from everywhere today, commending course m resisting Reed's dictatorial He also received telegrams from, many factories wan ting the number of his shoes, I nnouncing they would express him a pair The Texan, will probably receive 3j3 to last him the remainder of his it which are guaranteed to smash any r TO BE RENEWED TODAY. will be another day of interest, ittle will be Bought to a finish. -The "e Mr. Keed wil> get a qnorunrand will be ousted. 'risp's fight today has made Mm the -d leader of the democrats, and nis election to the speakership of tbe -oinocratic house. DExxxxu COJ-'FIBMED. Oenning is now Augusta's postmaster. -S and bitter fight over this office was .oday. The senate executive session Denning, it has been known for Lme that the confirmation would be Bnator Colquitt has madeevery effort 1 "im, but was unable to secure the a single republican senator to vote 3 president's nominee. He knew -10 hope of defeating the man with an majority of ten, or else be would fight in the senate directly. It ver, have been hopeless, and by 'Vould have angered certain re.- who would then have voted wm negro Dudley at Americas 3 tight he made ho saved the Confirmation "was made this morn- iNEWSPAFERr ing it wag agreed not to send the papers bacl, to the president nntil Senator Colquitt re- turned. Ho loft for Atlanta this morning on an urgent call. Thus Denning'a commission will not bo mndo out until next week. H will, however, assume the duties of the o by October 1st. GOVERXOR-ELECT JONES. Governor-elect Tom Jones, of Alabama, i here. He and Senator Daniel, of Virginia who were old schoolmates, met for the nrs time today since tlie battle of the Wilderness At that fight it was Colonel Jones who carrier SSnator Dauial oif tho field. Daniel was severely wounded iri the hip, which he yet suffers, and is compelled to use a crutch Colonel Jones says When lie left Danio wounded he never expected to see him alive Then they met as soldiers. Toda; they mot as senator and governor. THK- ATtAJtTA DISTRICT. The census office has completed tho coun of another Georgia district today. This time it is the third census district. The coan shoxvq np as follows: THIKD DISTRICT. Butts Campbell Carroll...... Clayton Coweta lieKalb Fayotte. Fulton Henry Jasper Morgan Newton Putnam sj W 18CO. 1SSO. Incr. Total.. 9.0TO 855 113 267 2.00L GbO 2SK 34 47" CITIES TOWNS. Griffin............... Newnan 4.4C5 2.006 84323.34 85342.52 Increase 21.14 per cent. THE TARIFF CONFEREES. They Will Mold Their Final Session Next Monday. "WASHINGTON, September confer- ence on the tariff hill this morning did not touch upon matters of public interest. The proceedings were confined to action upon pro forma amendments, or those involving no pronormced differences of opinion. Sugar, "b.nding twine and tho tariff commission clacaes were not touched. It is the under- standing of the democratic conferees that the daily sessions of the conferance are to be purely formal, and that points of real impor- tance at issue are to he brought forward only after the republican managers have first ad- justed their differences. It ia the metal schedule really the principal obstacle to the agreomeu] by the republican conferees, the senate con- ferees insisting on its amendments low ering duties, and the house confeieos insisting on the restoration of duties In the bill as it passed tho house. Inasmuch aa on mttet other mat- ters of importance, they have yielded to the demands of the senate, it is s.iid that the sugar schedule has boon agrted to Ly tho republic- ans, but formal action is withheld until other matters of difference are compromised. Tho general belief is now that the confereea will hold their final session oil Monday, and that congress adjourn about a week laier. THE BAMJ j FI.AY IN GAI.VESTON Because the President Has Signed the River and Harbor Bill. GiLVESTON, Tex., September cial news that tho president had signed the river and harbor bill, which gnes Galveaton practically 000 for her harbor improvement, caused tho greatest rejoicing here tonight. Cannons are being fired and the city is illuminated with a errand pyrotechnical display. Bands are playing throughout the city, houses are illu- minated and a system, of decoration -was com- menced that ivill give the city tomorrow a grand holiday appearance. The mayor has issued a proclamation relaxing all ordinances as to the discharge of pyrotechnics and firearms, an-1 declaring tomorrow to bo a day of general jubilee. The president's signa- ture on the river and harbor bill crowns with success the gulf outlet movement, begun by the Topeka and Denver conventions of two years ago. The general government is com- mitted to the completion at this point of a first-class harbor, on the basis of an appropria- tion of Although the wealthiest city relatively in tho union, the possibilities of Gulveston's future are boundless. THE THIRD OKUAT the Unite Connecting: Mexico With. States. SAN ANTONIO, Tex., September received here today from Mexico states that the government railroad in- spector has announced that the Pachucha, Seacnltipan and LampLco railroad will be com- plete and ready for formal opening in a very short time, and a corps of engineers is now engaged in locating that part of the line be- ween Apulco and Ziulancuigo. Tlie contract as beea let, and laborers will he. imme- diately put to worlc at constructing that divis- on. This road will form the southern end of a third great trunk line connecting Mexico Ity with the United States. The connection will be made at Eagle Pass, Tex. iVhicli Is to Pierce the "West for -the Bene- fit of "Atlanta. ONTGOMERY, Ala., 'September of incorporation of the Geor- gia, Tennessee and Illinois Railroad Company were today filed in tho office of the secretary of tate. The incorporates named are: J. H. Summer, J, M. McBrido and J. C. Bobbie, of Tallapoosaj Harralson Qa.; A. J. ifoBrideand the city of At- atita, Ga.; and B. Thomas, of Tennille, Ja. The amount of caoital stock of the pro- joaed -c'drporatlon" is fixed at di- into shares each. Tho in- rporattfrs ask tlie privilege of increasing the pital stock, not exceeding The terminal points offthe proposed road are rom some point on the line of the state of in the county of Cleburne or Cherokee n Alabama and through the counties of Cle- 3urne, Calhoun, Etowah and Jackson to the ;own of'Stevenson in the county" of Jackson, Ala. Purchase of Bonds and Silver. WASHINGTON, September of ilver offered for aale to the treasury depart- ment today aggregated ounces, and the amount purchased ounces, aa follows: ounces at @l.i6I4; at at at il.1649; at Offers of per ent bonds to the treasury yesterday for tbe nfire country aggregated making a otal of The prepayment of in.- ;ereat on 4s yesterday for the entire country amounted to making a total thus far of Offers of per cent bonds to the treasury for country today aggre- gated and prepayment of interest in 4 per cent bonds Returns from Jo3ton arc missing in both cases. DOWN INTO THE BIVEK A. TRAiy OJT THIS KOTT'OSf OF THE HORRIBLE ACCIDENT NEAR READINC Fifteen Dead Bodies Talicn From the Rive Forty or fifty Mfore Are Supposed to Be In the Cars. READING, Pa., September passenge train on ttie Beading road was thrown into llie Schnylkili river near Shoemakerville, fifteen, miles from Reading tonight, about 7 o'clock The engineer, fireman, conductor, baggage- master, mail agent and two passengers wore killed and thirty passengers injured, many o them very seriously. Aa further reports come from the wreck the magnitude of the disaster in creases. The train was a fast express and wa running forty miles an hourf? It had on board 123 to 150 passengers. The tram was composed of the engine mail, express and three passenger cars. An accident to a coal train on tho other track a .few moments before had thrown several car, on tlie track the passenger train was on, anc tho men on tlie wrecked coal train had no time cither to clear the track, or warn the pas senger train. The latter ran into the obstruc- tion and the entire train wont down a twenty foot embankment into the river. All sorts of wild Tumors are afloat. Some place the prob- able number of killed at forty or fifty. A special from Reading to The Inquirer says: George R. Knsrcher, an eminent railroat lawyer, of Pottaville, who also has a law office in Philadelphia, is among the killed. Persons who were well acquainted -with him have identified his crushed body in tho debris of a Pullman car. NVilliamD. Shomo, oho of Read- ing's w erlthiest citizens, Was a passenger o the train, and was one of tlie first parjous re ported killed. At o'clock p. m. a special train lof C this city for the scene of the wreck, taking the Philadelphia and Reading railroad surgeon 0r, Weidman, and a corps of eight assistants An electric light plant was also dispatched on the same train "which was speedily put in oper ation and greatly facilitated the work of mov ing the wounded. No passenger trains arriving after 6 o'clock. p. m., were permitted teyond this city All passengers from Philadelphia and inter mediate points for destinations north of Reading wore compelled to leave the trains Professor Mitchell, of university Kethelicm, is among the injured at tho Read- ing hospital' tjp to midnight thirteen bodies had been re- covered. Five bodies are exposed to view in tho wreck, but they are pinned under timbers and have notyet beon taken out. Wreckers of the Cressona and Reading have been sum- moned, and they are all hard at work. A good many passengers seem to have beon drowned in the partially submerged cars. At 2 o'clock this morning the situation was as follows: Three hundred men were atill at work, but they were ranking slow progress. Fifteen bodies hud boon taken out. Nona oi tho bodies have been taken from the aceoe of the disaster. It is still believed that twenty or more are underneath the wreck. Who they are is not known, because it is not known ivho was on the train, and how many were actuaMy killed will only bo disclosed with the removal of the engine and cara-from tlie bed of the river tomorrow. FIVE HUKDIHED A TnrJtlsH Man-of-War Founders at Sea. Osman Fas It a Amonu IHe Lost. LONDON, September from Hiogo state that the Turkish man-of-war Ertogroul has foundered at sea and that 000 of her crew wero drowned. The Ertogroul was a wooden frigate-built cruiser of tons-displacemen t. She mounted forty-one guns of small caliber, and was built in 1863. Osman Pah.sa and Ali Pasha, envoys of tho sultan to Iho emperor of Japan, wore passengers on the Ertogroul and were drowned. Osman Pasha, whose victory over tho Rus- sians at him high rank as a fight- ing general, was on hoard, and was lost. He, tiad been on ail official visit to Japan, having been entrusted with a special mission from the sultan to the rnikado. The progress of the "Ertogroul" since she left Constantinople for the east, many mouths ago, has been a most undignified aiid ludicrous one. She left Turkey a'lort of money, it being under- stood that supplies were to be sent for her use to the ports at which she was to call. Tlie result was that her sojourn in those countries was indefinitely prolonged, in conse- quence of home not being able to keep their promises. In this way she lost some her crew, and the officers were many times on the verge of rebellion, induced by starva- tion. The government of cities visited re- fused to remit harbor dues and grant other privileges that were of right due her as a Turkish man-of-war, on the ground that she was not sailing in that character, there not be- ug powder enough on board to enable her crew tire regulation salutes. After many adven- .uros, only worthy of an opera boulfo navy, the ".Ertogroul" finally arrived in Japanese waters, and it was on her return voyage that ihe disaster occurred. A "Wreck In hffexico. CITY OP MEXICO, September terrible accident happened today on the Mexican rail- way. Two trains going in opposite directions ran into each other at Hinconada and the cars piled on one another and completely wrecked. Ten persons were killed and sev- eral otuers wounded. _ WIIX NOT BE 'TAKEN BACK. Vice President Welib Says None of the Strikers Will Get work. ALBANY. N. Y. September Presi- dent Webb, of the Central-Hudson road, was nterviewed here today on tlie future action of he company towards tbe strikers who seek e-einployment. Mr. Webb said: "It may as well be understood right here that from now none of the strikers on the Central road be- ween New York and Buffalo, inclusive, will )0 reinstated. It is better for he men, for their families and or all concerned to know now that none of tbe men who are oat will bo back. The men left he employ of the, company six weeks ago to- ight, and they had ample opportunity to ap- ply for "work before this week. They well inderstood the policy of the road from the be- ginning, and they have1 seen it successfully es- abliahed. They did not seek re-emplpyment intil the strike had been declared oif, and in.ce then they hare nearly all asked to be put Forty Clrarcnes Represented. ANNISTON, Ala.. September 'he Coosa River Baptist Association has been in session at Oxford the past three days. Jajor Abnex Williams was elected moderator. L hot fight was made between the friends of fie Southern Baptist Publishing. House and lie American. Baptist Publishing House, bmo wanted Sunday school literature from tie former, wbile others wanted it from" the atter. The friends of tbe former won on a otuof54tol4. Forty churches wererenre- eiited. ___ T5ie KaSfevine Packing House. Bvnun, Tenn., September Nasavilie Packing House Corn- any organized here today by tbe election f Edgar Jones, president; Alex Perry, vice resident, and CharlesfHtzacber, secretary and reasnrar. 5Phe capital stock, oi this company S200.0CO, and it wilt lease one of the _g hoases to be btult oy the NashvilferStoek- yatd Company. CABOIXBTA BISPCEI-ICAKS. A -Resolution Camo a Sensation. "S, C., September The re- publican state'conventaon elected Internal Rev emifr Collector E. A. Webster chairmanjof th state executive committee. The platform adopted renews allegiance to the national re publican party and pledges renewed .zeal an< redoubled energy in its behalf, with a firm an< abiding faith that with ita moral influence un impaired, and its vital forces intact, otbe grand: and glorious achievements will be at taiired. It denounces the suppression am prostitution of the ballot in South Carolina declares that the American people should pu an etfd to such methods, so that fair and jm representation may be- had in allsectionsTvith out regard to race or party holds that the ed .ucational advantages afforded by the state aro totally inadequate and doficieii and Invokes liberal aid from the federa government; endorses heartily Harrison's ad ministration, feeling confident that his posi tive And firm advocacy of tho fullest pro- .tQctiob, to every citizen in the free and uu tramQieled exercise of his civil and politica will be sternly maintained and de- fended j endorses the financial policy of the administration heartily endorses and ap proves the course of Speaker in vind cation of the principles of republicanism in the rebuke administered to those who fraudulently and corruptly obtalnei seats in congress, and hails Kith satisfaction, and pleasure the prompt an ort was taken up and adopted without amend- ment except such as were submitted by the committee itself. It provides for a senate composed of forty-five members, and house of representatives of 133 members and by in- genious gerrymandering white supremacy is issured in both houses. Efforts were made by various counties to lave their representation increased, but the convention refused to disturb the symmetry of the committee's report and Ex-Gov- ernor Alcon made an earnest appeal to the onvention to so apportion tho state as to give he negroes control of the lower house of the egislature. He argued that such course would gain the confidence of the blacks and would gradually elevate them o an appreciative responsibility of citizenship. 7he new proposition met with, no encourage- ment, and the committee's report was not amended to conform to his views. Mr. Smith, of Warren county, submitted the following meudment to the constitution, which was re- erred to the judiciary committee: In all rixninal cases, less than capital, no error of aw shall be-ground for reversal, unless the is satisfied from the record that the jury npht to have found a different verdict on the In all cases of tort the supreme court' nay increase or diminish any verdict and udgment according to the justice of the case THIS Toonc Democrats to Tabe -Place In Raleich. K. C., September 'be full programme of the grand democratic mass meeting to bo held here on the 24th and 25th instant, was issued today. The young men's democratic clubs of the state, from Isheville to Newberne, will meet on tbe ad Governor Daniel G. Fowle will deliver 10 address of welcome. Julian 3. Carr, of >uEham, will preside at their meeting. The 5th will be given over to speech-making, and big barbecue at Brooksido park, "Speeches will there1 be made by Senators Vance and ;ansom, and Congressmen B. H. Bunn and ohn S. Henderson. gA. H. A. Williams, can- idate for congress in tbe fifth, district, will Iso speak. It will be the real opening of the democratic .ampaign. Thirty clubs will be officially rep- esentod. Republicans of Colorado. DENVER, Col., September this orning's Session of the republican state con- entiou, John L. Rputt, of Arapahoe connty, the nomination for governor and udge WilliamlStorey, of lieutenant ttvernor. He WWl Be Snowed Under. CHARLOTTE, N. September is now officially announced tnat Mr, C- Davidson: will oppose Captain S. B. lexander Tor congress in this the sixth dis- trict. Mr. Davidson is a ctrong man, and will ipou rote. He Is running on a rohibition ticket. WILL HELP THE CAUSE WSA.I O'BBIEIT SAYS OF FOUB'S PROMINENT LEADERS ARE ARRESTED The Impression in London IB That the Oov eraiaent Has Made a Serious Mis- Jen News. DUBLIN, September busiest plac in Dublin today is the headquarters of th land league. The nationalists are calling in constant streatn to learn the latest news in re- gard to tlie arrests, and to consult on plans o action for the immediate future. Mr. Dillon who came on to Dublin last night, is tlie cente of an animated circle. Ko note of despondency Is detected in the utterances of the leaders; o: the contrary there seems to be freah confidence and new enthusiasm. In stead of regarding the arrests a calamity the prevailing tendency istorejoice at them as a blessing in disguise. The action of Balfour, the nationalists hold to bare been an immense tactical blunder for the govern ment. They are satisfied that it will result in signal advantages to tbe Irish cause. The Inability of Dillon and O'Brien to inaki tho proposed trip to America is much re gretted. But the plan of presenting the true state of Ireland to the American public by of speeches by leading Irish orators haa not been abandoned. "Who will be selected to So to America has not yet been determined In O'Brien's absence it was not considered de sirable to come to any decision in so important a matter. It is certain that men prominent in the nationalist party will be selected to under- take the work in America which Dillon anc O'Brien had hoped to do. THE IN LONDON. LONDON, September arrest of Irish leaders yesterday fills a conspicuous place in the newspapers throughout the united king dom this morning. Various explanations are surmised to account for Balfour'a sudden stroke. The commonest one on tlie part of the liberal prefes is that its object was to prevent Dillon and O'Brien from going to America to arouse American sympathy and solicit Ameri- can aid. The conservatives, however, scout tbe idea that Balfour could have acted from such a motive. They see in bis present policy a laudable effort to prevent a recurrence oi disorder in Ireland. On the whole one geta the impression that predominant public opin- ion is so far extremely doubtful of the wisdom or expediency of the government's course. A TALK WITH O'SBXEN. Mr. O'Brien, in an interview this morning, said ho could not imagine what infatuation had drawn the government to make the ar- rests. It is easy to-see, he thought, what they are driving at. They are making a supreme effort to crush oat the organization of the ten- ants for concerted action. This they expect to accomplish, he thought, by 'simultaneous clearances on all estates where the plan of campaign has been adopted. The evicted tenants they calculate on their having help- less at their But, such a policy lie O'Biien was asked. he replied. "It is, in my opinion, a piece of inconceivable felony. Ent it seems to me that this is what the government proposed to attempt." "It is held by the correspondent said, "that the main purpose of Balfour in making tho arrests at this moment was to pro- vent Dillon and you from making tlio contem- plated trip to America." "That does seem a probable theory to replied Mr. O'Brien "but if it is the true one, a more absurd calculation was never made, even by tho present chief secretary for Ireland. Far from preventing our appeal to America, ie has made it for us in tho most striking and repressive way. The story of these arrest? will ring throughout America like a trumpet note, compared with which our voices would have been leeble and ineffective. All Irish- Americans know that Tipperary is the key to the fight for Ireland. They will take care to rostrate the dastardly calculation of the gov- ernment." "What do you the correspondent asked, "will be the ultimate effect of the gov- irnment's present course on the cause you rep- "It is altogether Mr. O'Brien without hesitation. "It will close up he ranks of our followers, revive drooping courage and banish every shadow of dissen- ion. The combination in Tipperary is auso- utely impregnable and cannot be COMMENTS OF THE FHEEMAN'S JOURNAL. DUBLIN, September Freeman's Tournal in Its leading aiticle this morning, says: If tho government's object was to stop the visit fDilion and O'Brien to America, the an are shameful confession of weakness and discom- ture, Further on Balfour's policy is characterized ,s "a piece of which will give to he plan of campaign a mcsfc invigorating and xhilaratlng stimulus. The independent coii- ervative Dublin Express, in an article com- mending the government's cause, says: It is an unperative necessity to secure relief rora the tyranny now exercised by tenants. "Warrants were issued against Mesrrs. Dillon nd O'Brien, but only summonsesagainst the thera. Mr. Dillon, in an interview dwelt upon his fact as proving that tho intention was to ronstrate the American tour of himself and Sir CuArlcs Russell, referring to tie same matter in a speech at Darlington, said the arrests might have incited the people o violence bat happily they had not. Messrs. Cullinane and Dalton returned oluntorily to Dublin, on learning that war- rants were issued for their arrest because they nd gone to England. MORE AKHESTS. Joan Cullinane and Michael Dalton, mem- ers of the national league, have been arrested. T. D. Sullivan'will probably make a tour of jnerica. THE; CAVAJ.IIIL Imposing Scene at the Alabama Mili- tary Academy. Hujrrsvxu.B. Ala., September authorities of the Alabama Mili- ary Academy announced today that the-bar- acks were filled to overflowing, but tents are eing arranged on the campus, which will ac- ommodate those wno come till other arrange- ments can be made. The contract forthebuild- ing of another wing to the present barracks wul be given out at once. The building is to be ready in thirty days. The first cavalry drill was given the cadets this afternoon, and the company marched through the city forty-two strong, mounted and equipped. This is the only military school in the United States with the cavalry aril} except "West Point, Firo In Enrlington, 77. C. house belonging to tbo Burlington Coffin Co., at Burlington, JN. C., containing their stock of coffins and caskets, was burned last night. The loss is believed to be total. The following companies represented in Southgate Sons' agency, Durham, KT. C., were as follows: each in London Assurance. Hartford, Queen and Southern, and in the Tirginia Fire and A MOMENT OF PASSION. Tito Sad Result Which It Has Brought to V. B. Edwards. ALBANY, Ga, September The sad results' of a moment of passion, or per- haps of the drink demon's control, is demon- strated in tho case of C. H. Edwards, tua murderer of Marshal .Lewis Barbonr, at New- ton. After the war had ended this young man, coming from a good old-fashioned Baker county family, started his struggle with the world. Without means and with the determination to succeed, he let no obstacles deter him. He determined to follow tho -plow, as his fathers had done before him. He commenced with one ox, and struggled man- Jully alone- Success slowly crowned hi9 efforts. The other day he imbihed too freely, and became riotous upon the streets of New- ton. It resulted in his slaying the officer who attempted to arrest him, and m being himself wounded. Now he is occupying a call in the jail at Albany and haunted by voices which his half-demented mind conceives to be tho tones of como to wreak geance unon him for bia mad deed. His prop- erty, which in the slow course of years he had with so great a struggle accumulated, has beon all suddenly swept away, being deeded, lie says, to the lawyers to defend Mm in the courts. He leaves ten children penniless, as his family had grown in proportion to his other posses- sions. Threo mules, two horses and a 250-acra- improved farm -are what he turns over to tho attorneys to take his case. THEY JLEFT THEIR CASES. A Bow Between Union and Non-Union Printers in Man mouth, MONMOUTH, 111., September union, printers on The Daily Journal, of this city, struck last Tuesday. The force waa abouC evenly divided between the union and non- union men. The foreman, who was a recent acquisition to the force, discharged a non-union, man to make room for one who belonged to the union. The proprietor would not allow this, whereupon the union men quit work, forcing the non-nnion men to go" out also. Tuesday night the union men received in- formation that Linn, one of the non-union. men, was going to work the next day. They immediately visited him and threatenad to kill him unless ne left town immediately. Ha was last seen being escorted to the depot. Ifc is feared by that Linn has met with foul play. Lebnancher, another non-nnion man, went to work on "Wednesday. When he left the office the union men, who were lying in wait, made for him with clubs and brickbats, and would have probably seriously injured hipi buC Tor the intervention of some outsiders. Tlio iffair caused much excitement, and alleged leaders of the strikers have beon indicted by the grand jury for conspiracy and intimida- tion. Five are now in jail, and quiet has been restored. The Printers to Go Oat. S. C.. September printers in The World office tonight waited on tbe managing editor and demanded ;he discharge of tho foreman, the alternative aeing they wonld leave tho office. The editor and the men will go out Tue-day night. The office remains strictly non-uuron. THE OLD CO57PJLE Because Tlieir Objected to- tlie Match. pgecl slxty-iive, -aud Sir cereniony perorme. Mrs. Harris ins entered on her third matrimonial while Mr. Harris has stood at the altar but once before. "When the coupJe returned home, t is reported, the neighborhood turned out and SHE VTIX KOT J3ANQ Jut Persists Meant line In Playing on tfao Harp. N. C., September [Special .J Jex Morton, tiie negro "woman in man's othes" who was sentenced to be banged Oc- murdering a womaniat Kingston, will not swing at that time. An appeal to the upreuie court puts off the execution to De- ember. In tho meantime, Alex quite beorful, "but positively refuses all proffers of consolation. Her time in Tail is pent mostly in playingonaharp. She plays in- essautly and sings as she plays. The incrimi- lating letter which she sent to the chief witness gainst her has been found, and though torn. ii a thousand pieces, has been sent to tho to see if it can bo put together. 7he truth will stand revealed. She denies lie portion givonjof it in the testimony icr. SEVJEN ESCAPE. Wooden Key JLetS Tliem Oat of tlie Front Door. CHATTANOOGA, Tenn., September a jail delivery at the city jail this orning, seven prisoners escaped. They scaped regularly through the cell door, and it s supposed a wooden key was used. Tho ames of the prisoners are Frank Ilbarlie Mitchell, Saui Colyar, Ben Frankhn, C. Wheeler, Tom Bird and Henrv Stafford. 'he prisoners were charged with larceny. 'Jbne of them have yet been captured, and it s believed they have escaped in a boat and one down tue river. Shot- from Ambush. NASHVILLE, Teiin., September omes from Tenn., that K. D. superintendent of tho coal mines, yesterday shot from ambush, recen ing; ital wounds. There has been trouble in tho ineSj the men employed having quit last nly, and they were told a few days since that nless they resumed work their places would e filled by convicts. s Indictments Against Enumerators. MINNEAPOLIS, Minn., September 'nlted Stated grand jury this morning re- urned nineteen indictments against tbe Jeged census paddors in this city and in St. aul, six for Minneapolis and thirteen for St. aul. Sis Minneapolis enumerators "were nested tonight and gave bail. A Michigan Town In Rains. MTLYC-AUKEE, September special to 'lie Evening Wisconsin from "White Hall, lich., says an incendiary fire swept away tho usiuess portion of that place early this morn- ng. Thirty dwellings were consumed. Loss three-fourths covered by insurance. BREVITIES. The president signed the river and harbor bill csterday. Cuolera has broken out among the Italian forces t Mabsowuh. Tho steel made in Chattanooga from southern on is said to be of high grade. George R. Davis, of Illinois, was yesterday ected director of the world's fair. Senlior Ferrac lias been entrusted with tha jrmatlon of newca.bia.et for Portugal. George D.THlman was renomimiti'd for congress om tue second congressional district of Soutli arolina yesterday. The strike in Now Soutli Wales continues. Tha bor conference has decided to call out the sheep rearers and wool carriers next Monday. Tlie mayor of New York has asked the police ommissionera that a sufficient number of police- en be detailed to aeSist him in making tfce now 3BSUB- Colonel Jacob M. Tbornburgb, ex-member ot ongr< ss fro.ni the second Tennessee led KnoxTiUe yesterOay moraing, aged irwyeaw, s- NEWSPAPER!   

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