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Atlanta Constitution Newspaper Archive: August 20, 1890 - Page 1

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   Atlanta Constitution, The (Newspaper) - August 20, 1890, Atlanta, Georgia                               VOL. XXII ATLANTA, GA., WEDNESDAY -ASJGUST 20, 1890.-TEN PAGES. PRICE FIVE CENTS. i THE FORGE BILL SETTLED TODAY. THE SENATE TO DECIDE ITS FATE. Quay's Resolution Will Be Acted Upon, 8TROM3 EFFORTS TO BEflT QUflY. Charley Grosvenor's Bad Break- Other Capitol News. TV August 19- [Special Soritor Quay, at the request of Senator nr, "Ticcfully il'onc'l his resolution bury- ing the fouo bill, to go over until tomor- row I: w.ll be iv.lled up at 10 o'clock m the inon.nig, debated at length and dib- ul of Tic programme ii veil arranged by tlie thn force bill. The democrats sit blicutly b> and allow tho repub- luars to fight an mi" Qnay wil1- .il.so sit buem.y aiul, unless it becomes aU'I'tely iicce'-s.ur, "'ill say nothing Of the anti-Quay crow d, Hoar is the leader Ho ui'l make the oiH-nmg speech ajrmiit the 311 lu> will tako occasion to picture In b'ood ami thunder stj'e the condition of tl.e at1 airs in the south as lie sees it through Ins hU'udj-retl ejc-ila-so-s. Even now. tonight, the granny, arrayed in a snov. lute- nisi, t t, nrr, with red collars ami i> lohcarsiiiir his bo ft re the inir- roi m his LaFaietiu mansion. He is infixed with Ins, sj'eecl., but leais defeat Todiy he and oimei u been straining to up oppoMt'cn to the Qu.iv .iluui. Thej attempted to call a caucus fur tonight, but the Quay forces to attend, stating that the must now bo made in open senUe vnmo little opposition, and uoiiovera few dmmlful men, but it, t confitlt ut. Tonight he saTb he w ill atrree to no com- proir.se Hoar has not he ai. i now he go down m deiear, Uic tlag aiut cry in a voice so li .iL1 as to be heard Indeed, Quay said U night his icsolntion was ceLtain to in Us original shape, six republican They will st.md matters not hov propriated next year and more the following j year, if necessary, until tho park ib thoroughly beautified. E. W. B. GKNEKA1L NEWS FKO.U -WASHINGTON. Tlio Ranm The GovernmoMt's Exhibit at ilio fair. WASHINGTON, August 19. The committee to Pension Commissioner Kaum, under Representative Cooper's resolution, waa completed by the addition of Mr. Lewis, of Mississippi, oj> the remaining democratic mem- ber and tLe imodtigataoii begin tomorrow. Ilecoiib of the pension olfice that up to dare that there h.ivc been rooeivou ap- pl pensions under the dependent art of June 'J7, Of the number have been returned to the applicants because ot defects 111 the The othco is said to be gieatly in need uf the additional force pro- m tho bill, recently passed thpseiKito. The president today approved tho dcsigua- tion the following named persons ad members of the board of control and manage- inent i.f the yoi eminent exhibit at tho Ch'csgo exiiibitiou: S. A chief nf the department of to ronrt sent t'mt depart! i ent A. T5. NetUeton, assistant of tlie treasuiy, to represent the dupmtuiont iMajor Clifton Coml.v, I" f> V to tho ar dopaitmont t'-H'Min K- Meadly, C. S. K., to the navy department; A. third assistant to i epresent tho postoftice nt, II. A. Taj lor, cominKsiuner to the dejiartiuont nf tho Ij Foster, gcner.il of the POLITICAL NEWS THROUGHTHE SOUTH. BR4WLEY HAS BEEN. NOMlffiTED. Other Features of the South Carolina Campaign. A LITTLE GEORGIA POLITICS, represe "trnci ,tl of jusfeo, to pailmonl tCii u m WilhtA, of-I'TifultuiP. to represent the ih'pixrtiuent of .urtituamo G B. Hondo, assistant it'tnrs SiMithsr-iM.ui iii-.titut'tn. to represent Ui ir in-f t'Uiuit tu.d the iittliorai mu-seuin, and J. W assistant in chaise of the divis- ion of f shenes. to tlie United States hsh runii'iissHin. Assistant Secretary WUlits ia desiiniattMl as cl> uimau of the board. ----w WHAT WEBB WILL Case tlio Congressional Conventions Southern States. m He ha senatots commuted to him. th him through tho fight, it hesuy the firing from the other side He has rea-on to belies o en nn 10 are with him, making thirteen in all, "but he does not count theto as sine. AV.lh the six, howler, victory be TTlie democrats, to a man, will oto ith Quaj and Tilth Ins bix followers he cairj tho   nning -would be confirmed as postmaster at Augusta, within a few days. He says he no longer hia hope of defeating Donning. The Inspector's report, Inch makes charges, against Donning, amounts to nothing. The report the check from the city was raised, but Deiiiung did not do it, and when he found it oil, immediately repaid the sum. Nothing then, and tho inspector thinks it very late td spring it now. A1- 10 his buying votes, the inspector aaya he TT, nod for it and acquitted. Referring to 3iu physical condition, the inspector says he is sound in all his legs and will probable recover their use. Senator Sawyer, chairman of the senate postoffico committee, says the report is satis- factory. Denning is all right, and will be con- firmed within a few days; probably this week. The Agricultural College Bill Passed- The agricultural college bill, in which Pro- lessor "White has been so interested, passed tho house today. It gives the agricultural col- leges of each state the first year, 000 the second, and so on, increasing at the rate of annually, until is reached, at which it shall remain as a perma- nent annual appropriation. The money is to Come from the sale of public hinds. J The Compound Lard Bill. The compound lard bill is to be taken up tomorro-w. It will be voted upon Saturday. The chances are the bill will pass by about twenty majority. "While the southern demo- crats -will fight hard, they have no hope. In Case tlio Fireman Stilko on tlio Central. Nnw YOKK, AugUbt Master Vruiknnn Fowdtr.j and Secretary Hayes, of the Kirghts of Lubov, aimed here this morn- ing Grand Ch'of S.irgeiit, of tho Firemen's Lmoii, Wilkinson, ol the Trainmen's ASS.O- ciat.on, Cliai'iian George HoMard, of the llailway Conductors, and Gi.uid Mastei Sweene'y. of the Mutual Aid As- s ard and keep them closo 1 until I obtained a suflicitnt nuin- bti of new fuomen to resume freight tratnc. Tins I think, lean accomplish forty- :is 1 have lonj; lists, of men who will con.e at the we w ill pay. My road uvpcnd to win, und in inv ac- tion L am backed up by the stockholders." t HB A SI AT J MKNT. Third Vice President Webb sent the follow- to the Associated tins atternoon: statement ti is been to Al'jjny and along the HUB oi tins ro.i 1 tn.it I exnrfcbscil n.il.irorenee tlua niornin" as to the Hi omen, in our omiHov went out ou a strike or mit, and that L that I Ii.'-d plenty of men to nil tbeir places. There is not a. w of trutb in the fat icement, ami 1 would thAiik jou to insert this denial iu jour rwi Third Vice President. THC LCAVCKS IN CON1-EKENCE. The much talked of confeience of labor tiny evening occurred at St. Cloud hotel at UJ 13 o'clock and lasted two linuia. There present   AND TRUE. JTon. George Wise Chosen for tlie Slstli Consecutive Time. RICHMOND. Va., August Hon. Georgo D. Wise has been chosou for the sixth consecutive time as the democratic standard bearer in the third congressional dis- trict. Ho has served four terms and received the certificate two years ago, but was unseated by the present house of representatives to make room for Waddill. The nominating convention assembled in the Bullard house here today at noon, all of the Ili9 delegates elected, except one, either personally or by alternates. The contest in -which Colonel Tazewell, Ellett and Speaker Card-well, of the house of delegates, opposed Mr. Wise, has been the most warmly waged friendly fight that has oc- curred in this district for ten years. As indi- cated in my previous dispatches, though Mr. Wise has been ahead all along and on the first ballot, which was taken by roll call, he re- ceived sixty-four votes, just the number required to nominate. While there were 128 delegates, there were two less votes, ono county having elected too many. When the sixty-fourth vote was cast for Wise there was the wildest enthusiasm, and the body burst into a perfect uproar, which only suspended to become even greater when the nominee waa invited in to make his speech of acceptance. He spoke briefly, but with more than his usual force. Messrs. Ellett and Cardweli made very graceful speeches, pledging their cordial support and invoking that'of their friends for the nominee. TiOKTH CAKOLINA ALX. RIGHT. Tlie Alliance, Lilto in Georgia, la Xnsiole tlie Party. If. C., August The democratic executive committee met here this morning, Edward C. Smith presiding, and discussed the state convention of tomorrow as well as general political matters and campaign work. The chairman says the outlook is all right. The Farmers' Alliance, about winch there is so much talk, is all in the democratic party, and it will organize the counties as they were never before organized. The alliance, of course, controls the conventions of all the counties._______ CA.RROUL PRIMARIES TODAY. Four Candidates, All Well Known, and Two riaees to Fill. Ga., August Carroll's primary comes of tomorrow to nomi- nate two candidates for the legislature. There are four candidates in the field, Cap- tain George F. Snence having published a card in The Times today with are W. G. McDaniel, E. Harper and Dr. L Bowe. G. W. and Harper were members of the last house, and E. K. Sharpe was the senator from the thirty-seventh district in tlie last senate. Dr. Bowe is a citizen of Temple and was a member of the last Georgia state con- stitutional convention. There is considerable interest taken in the nomination and a pretty good vote will be polled. Voters cast their ballots direct for the men of their choice. TROUP COUNTY CANDIDATES. Bace other jmoiiths; closing steady, -with prices on August and September and advance of three to four points on other prices. There August, with nonths from yesterday's closing price; vaaaneaiiy decline, especially in Augt. I.nerpool dull and lower, Manchester sluggish. lower southern markets and long selling, but The Chlekamauga park bill was signed by the president today. It appropriates for the purpose of making the necessary surveys Sn northwest Georgia for the park and to fcegia, on it. An equal 0am TriU be ap- late tbere was a rallv, owing to covering, stronger unva-to from Liverpool ana some uood bujm" bv leading firms. Cotton on spot was dull and ueak, taut not quotably lower, Suicide of n, Discarded Suitor. Va., August Percy Barnea, a young machinist employed at the locomotat e works, committed -suicide this afternoon in Sehene's barroom, on Sev- enteenth, street, by taking laudanum. The trouble is said to have been the refusal of a voung lady to marry him, as she had promised. Barnes was twenty-three years old. A FiRlit witli Outlaws. VANCK, Tex., Anqust bloody battle tvitli Mesican outUws was fought near Beaver Lake, in this county, yesterday morning, during which five men were killed. The bandits wore surrounded by omeers and a pogso of citizend and an attempt made to arrest them The outlaws fought like demons. Burrows, one of the posse, was killed at the first fire. Four of the desperadoes slain, the fifth making his escape. Jumped to Mio JDeatb. SAS AsraroNio, Texas, August Dr. "William Garrison, a prominent physician and citizen of Victoria, jumped from a moving train, a few days ago> while suffering from a temporary aberration, ol mind. Efo received I injuries from which he died today. 3 the bouse of representatives is reduced to 100, resolved to uia ntam white supremacy and consequent goon government in the state of Missinpi, it is easen- ti.il that several counties in the Yazoo delta be limited to one member in tho bouse of representa- 4 Resolved, That to permanently maintain (rood Government in said counties, it is essential that all county offices be fiJ led by executive ap- pointment, as the governor may be advised by primary nomination conventions regulated by H.W. WILI-IKG TO MAKE SACRIFICES. As Mr. Paxton is a representative of one of the counties where the negroes largely out- number gthe whites, his resolution is re- garded as indicative of a willingness on the part of the people. He represents to make political sacrifices in order to avert negro su- Delegate Thompson's proposition is, that the state be divided into twelve grand politr ical divisions, composed of six or seven coun- ties each, which divisions shall each elect ten representatives and two senators to serve in the state legislature; that all state oflicers shall bo elected by twelve state electors ap- pointed by the aforesaid twelve grand polit- ical divisions. A DISQTTALrFICATIOX. Delegate McLauren, of Eankin, raised a laugh by offering an amendment providing that no person, convicted of wife-beating shall hereafter be a qualified elector. This resolu- tion is based on the theory that many negroes are wife heaters. The views of the republican members of the convention are probably indicated by a plan of suffrage submitted today by Sim mil, p ;t -wiio was chiel justice of Missis- Great Interest IB in the Coonty Offices. Ga., August A primary election will be held in Troup county Thursday, for the purpose of nominat- ing candidates for county offices. There aie several candidates for the various offices, and tbuy have been canvassing the county in a livelv manner. Enough tickets have boon printe'd to supply the whole con- gressional district. The result is anxiously awaited by the candidates and their friends. There are half a dozen candidates for treasurer It has become the custom of this county to give this office to some old and needy man, who has nothing to do with the office except draw the salary. One the merchants makes bond and attends to all the duties of the office. Politics in Macon, MACOW, Ga., August 18. On "Wednesday night the people of Vineville will hold a meeting to appoint a committee to con- fer with committees from the citizens of South and East Macon in regard to the legis- lative campaign, annexation, etc. The people of Godfrey 'will meet on. Thursday night at Jenkins's store to discuss annexation. On Friday night the candidates for the legis- lature will speak OIL Culter's Green in East Macon, by invitation of the citizens of East Macon. It is rumored today there is a strong possibil- ity of Major A. O. Bacon and Captain J. L. Hardeman being brought; into the legislative race. Other candidates may be brought into the contest. The campaign may yet be very lively. _ _ Gobb County Candidates. ACWOBTH, Ga., August Colonel "W. B. Power, one of the legislative aspirants, was in Acworth a few days ago, and went away very much encouraged. Mr. Power would make on efficient representative. Mr. B. Kainy, one of tlie alliance candidates, lives near here. He is an intelligent, honest farmer. who has won the confidence and esteem of his neighbors by ard and candid deal- ings. He will poll at the primary, on the 30th, practically a solid vote. "When he is satisfied a thing is right he will stand by it to the last. He has always been an active organized demo- crat, and will never swerve from what he re- gards as democratic. "We need have no fears from the hands of Mr. Rainy should lie bo elected. _ It Is Senator JHUtcIieH. tE, Ga., August [S MURPHY, N. August Mrs. Gould is under arrest again. The troubles of the woman who stabbed her husband to death are by no means over. A new phnso in her case developed this morning, when she was again placed tinder arrest. It will bo remembered that, after killing hor husband, Mrs. Ial> M. Gould was ar- rested and, after an examination before a local magistrate, was released, the magis- trate holding that her deed was in seU- defeuse. At that time public sympathy was largely in her favor. The story told by the negro boy, who was tho only vitncss to the affair, was believed, and the fair Lily's plight ap- pealed to tho sympathies of the male por- tion of Murphy, if not to the female portion. The stury of her life, as told in her long letter to THE CONSTITUTION, waa read with groat interest; and so, too, was the story of the brothers of her dead hus- band, which -seemed to throw a different light upon her character. But she succeeded in making those who thrown near her "believe that eho was a 0much-wronged, woman, and the homes of many of our people v.ere open to her. Since the publication of her last letter in THE CONSTITUTION, Mrs. Gould has led a quiet life. It was understood that she was staying here until the proper steps toward closing up her husband's estate were taken. Gould bad some money in an Atlanta bank, and steps v.ere taken to this. She has boon in frequent consultation with her lawyers here, but with what result is not known. But Mrs. Gould's habits have not been the most exemplary. By this I mean no reflection upon her character further than that an inordinate love for liquor seemed to rule her. Her un- fortunate appetite for strong drink has about all tho respect and sympathy which the people here had for her. One gentleman, however, evinced great in- terest in her. A day or two ago Mrs. Gould announced her intention of leaving Murphy, an.l it was understood that she as to go to New York, there to be put into a private in- ebuatc asylum at the instance of the gentle- man here referred to. This morning she was to leave Murphy. Every preparation had been made and had bidden adieu to the few friends w ho still had remained kind to her. Iler trunks were all packed and she was ready to board the tram, when a warrant for her arrest was served on her. She was completely dumfotmded. She is greatly distressed at this new turn affairs have taken and baa been in consultation all day with her lawyers, trying, it is presumed, to find the best way to get out of her troubles. The warrant was sworn out by an English- man, who is acting as the agent for the family of Gould. He has been instructed under no circumstances to let Mrs. Gould get away. The brothers of Gould are on their way to America. On their arrival they will, it is claimed, vigorously prosecute the unfortunate woman. It is claimed that new evidence tending to show that Mrs. Gould is not alto- gether blameless ha'a been discovered, but just what that evidence is, it is impossible to learn. Mrs. Gould's statement of the affair seems to show that she acted with deliberation in the killing ol her husband. And There May Re a Lynching: 15ce Which He Will Take Some Interest. MONTGOMERY, Ala., August Additional paiticulars of the murder and tha confession tho assassin of Hon. 12. G. Maull representative-elect of the legislature in Lownde1', was received in this city, today. A. colored from Chicago, one Of Pinker- ton's men, was placed in the cell with two of the suspected He icmained with them eleven days He then asked to be turned out. A negro boy, about nineteen years old, who had been bound to Maull, confessed that he stole Maull's gun for John another negro, who hated Maull, and proposed to assassinate him. Kyan also confessed to th3 e, and afterwards confessed to tha sheriff. 1C now turns out that Uj an had con- to a negro previous to liifa arrest and iticarceration, arid, since ho has been in jail, he gave the negro his best shirt not to tell. There is much indignation over the assasb.na- tion in Low lidos, and a lj ncliing bee is probable. Thousands dollar-, have been spent by the widow of deceased, who waa very wealthy, running dow n the murderer. A WOMAX'S TJ ami's TWO VISITS. Chagrined at Being Whipped by a Woman, Ho KeturnB and a Tragedy Occurs KKW ORLEANS, August special to tho Times-Democrat from Belton, Tex., says: "On the 14th in the northwestern part of this county, W. H. T-vvcdel went to the residence of A. B. Tyler during his absence, and drew his gun on Mrs. Tyler, threatening her life, but she being a cool and determined woman, went into the house, got a six-shooter and ran him off. Sunday evening Twedel returned with his son George, and a negro, and sur- rounded the house. Twodel opened fire on Mrs. Tyler, wounding herin the hand and arm, and also wounding her little boy. JNlr. Tyler, hearing the screams of his wife and child in tho yard in front of the house, ran to their rescue, when George Twcdel shot him, killing him instantly; after which they came to Belton and surrendered, and are now in jail. The negro was captured today and brought in and jailed. No cause ia known leading to the tragedy." BESIDE HER She Kills Cor no CJ.IISQ Her Political Enemy. SAN ANTONIO, Tex ,Aujru.st Max Stem, of Edenburg, Tes. district judgo of the Hidalgo county circuit court, was shot and killed this morning at Reynoso, Mexico, in cold blood. The deed was committed by H. T Mc- Cabe, tho wife of ex-Judge McCabe, a bitter political enemy of Stem Judge Stein and h's wife went to Roynoso yesterday to attend the county fair being held. there. They were btrolhng around tho plaza of the town this morning arm in arm, when. they wore met by Mrs McCaLc, who, without a word of warning, drew a revolver of small caliber and fired, the bullet entering the body under tho left breast, and passed out at the back, producing instant death. The murderess made a resistance when her arrest was attempted by the Mexi- can authorities. The only cause assigned for the assassination is that there has been bad blood existing be- tween the two families for some time, grow- ing out of political troubles. EIGHT PASSENGERS KIIXJED And Twenty Injured Jin a Railroad Acci- "ttefrit in Massachusetts. BOSTON, August 19. A serious accident hap- pened to Cape Cod and Woodshall train on the Old Golohj road at Qumcy at 1 o'clock this afternoon. The train jumped tho tract fifteen feet from President's bridge. The first coach fell on tho engine, the latter having toppled o- er. The engine set fire to tho tram. The fireman was instantly killed and the engineei injured. As far a3 can be learned, there wore eight passengers killed and about twenty injured. The latter are for the greater part in- jured by escaping steam, having been frightfully scalded The Qnincy fire de- partment was called to tho scene as quickly as possible and shortly afterward tho tire was extinguished. The dend and injured were removed from the scone, the latter being1 taken into, prh ate houses and to the Quincy hospital. The 5ceue of tlie accident is near tho scene of the fnijhtful AVollastcn disaster a foiv years ago. The train is the Vine} ard er- press, due in lloston at o'clock, and con- sists of five or six pailor and passenger cars, usually fully loaded. It is usually running at forty miles an hour near this point. A FASSKNGER TELLS OF THE WRECK. "William. Tennell, a house builder of Boston, was a passenger in the fourth car of the train. It was in this car, he says, that most casual- ties occurred. The train was running through Qumcy at tho rate of thirty miles an hour. "When near President's bridge, there was a rumbling sound, followed by an awful crash. The three forward cars lurched and left tho track. The fourth kept tho rails and swept right along upon the broken locomotive, which. lay in its way, forcing itself right on top of it. Tbe shock was terntic, and it seemed as if tho car drove up twenty feet in the air. "VVhen the car descended on tho engine, it swirled suddenly over, its occupants being violently about Steam came into tho car in dense clouds from, the locomotive beneath, scalding and almost suffocating the people penned inside. In tho descent of the car a hole was torn in the bottom of it, through which as many aa forty or fiftv people were taken out. Mr Ten- nell thinks six or'sevon persons were killed and twenty-five slightly injured He thinks tho spreading of the ne twenty-five slightly injured accident was caused by the Fireman James Ryan, of South Boston, is under the engine, while Engineer Babcock; woa thrown noon an embankment and but slightly injured. Mr. Tennell thinks the steam caused all the deaths in this car. About fortv passengers were in the car and all suf- fered more or less injury. THE KILLED ANT> WOUNDED. The following dead when taken from the wreck: Mrs. Orcutt Allen, Philadelphia; Mrs. Mary E. Fennelly, aged seventy, Louis- ville Ky. F. J- Johnson, Vt.: John Ryan, South Boston, fireman of this train and lour women, two men ana two chil- a boy of total twelve. The following died during the afternoon and evening- Mrs. A.. C. Wells, Hartford, Conn., daughter of H. L. Welch, of Watcrvillo, Conn. The following are critically injured: Mia. Oscar Fenhollv, of Louisville, Ky.: wife of tho cashier of Citizens' National bank, Louis- ville scalded over her whole body; and her daughters, Alice and Catherine. C. M. Coop, Cleveland, O scalded over the whole body; o, sippi under republican role. Judge SimraU's vlan provides as a qualification for a voter a residence of Wo years in the state, one year in The seventh, senatorial convention which met at McDonald unanimously nominated Hon. BobertG. Mitchell. He will receive the solid democratic vote of the three counties compris- ing the district. A I-ody Found with Three "Wounds in Hor Scad. COLUMBIA, S, C., August Yesterday morning, Reuben Ford went to the house ol liia son-in-law, John Ford, in Fair- field county, and found his daughter, Eugenia Ford, kneeling beside her bed unconscious, with .three deep gashes in her head. The skull was crashed in, and from one of the wounds the brains were exuding. An ax was found in the house with blood upon tho A physician waa summoned, but Mrs. Ford died before he arrived. John Ford, tiie husband, could not bo found, and nothing has been seen or heard of bun since. A warrant has been, issued for his arrest, and a search is being rcaao for him. Mrs. Ford had been sick for several months and unable to work, and it is supposed that Ford became wearied of her and took this way of ridding himself of tho burden of support- ing her. _______ "Efcero "Was Arsenic in the August committee of the Servian progressist party attended a ban- quet at Topola. Subsequently all members 01 tha committee were taken ill and their symp- toms showed they were suffering from arseni- cal poisoning. It ia suspected that prseiue Kev. T. M. Dimnic. Loa Angeles, Cal., face-, arms and hip scalded. His wife had her faco and bands scalded, and suffered a compound fracture of both bones of the left leg half way between the knee and ankle. .Mrs-. George I hands badly scsiueu anu M-s. A. B. Abbott, Louisville, face and hands scalded and compound fracture of the lefts thijrh, condition cnticaK __ TIic Is Over. August Don Galindo, Sal- vadorian agent at Guatemala City, telegraphs to Piesulent Ezeta that peace, honorable to Sal% ador, lias been arranged. _____ TELEGRAPH BRB VlTIES, A verv Hgfct snow, the first of tha season, felt at Uenvcr, Col., ou Mondaj night last. Bond oIEennfp yesterday all accepted at 524 for4per cents and 103% for Tiie democratic convention in tho fourth con- grcsaiooal district of Louisiana reuominatcd 2T. C. Elanchard. Tke president has signed the bill for the Jb- lisnment of a military park at the battlefield ot Cliickamauga. iaau _ demptioi   

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