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Atlanta Constitution Newspaper Archive: August 16, 1890 - Page 1

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   Atlanta Constitution, The (Newspaper) - August 16, 1890, Atlanta, Georgia                               THE ATLANTA CONST VOL. XXII. ATLANTA, GA., SATURDAY MORNING, AUGUST 16, 1890. PRICE FIVE CENTS. COMPLETELY OUTVOTED WESE THE FORCE BIT.T, 31EN BY THEIS OWJf SESA.TOKS. THE STORY OF THAT CAUCUS. Steed and. the Pro-Force 'Bill Men Anxious to Ellntl Some Way Out of Their Predica- News. "WASHINGTON, August developments today regarding last night's senatorial caucus demonstrate that tho re- publicans who (favor the shelving of the Ijayonet bill not only douiinatoil the caucus, but absolutely controlled a majority of the Totes, The test of strength came when Senator Hoar made a motion to include the elec- tions bill in the programme of legislation for this session. Tho vote resulted: (Allison, Blair, Casey, Dolph, Ed- munds, Evarts, Hawley, lliggins, Hoar, In- galls, Mandersou, Moody, Flalt. Sanders, Sherman, Spooner, "Wilson and Alilicn, Cameron, Davis, Dixou, Hale, Hiscock, Jones of Nevada, McMillan, Mitchell, Paddock, Pettigrow, Plumb, Power, Quay, StoekViridgo, Teller and It was defeated by a square yea and nay vote, and the Quay men could easily have followed up their victory by passing the Quay resolution. Some of them favored putting the force bill crowd out of their imscr> on tho spot. The counsels of the more conservative who tliat feeling was running high and that tho adoption of the resolution would cause a split which would not only de- stroy all party discipline but which might lead to all sorts oi unpleasant results, pre- vailcd. It was, therefore, deemed best to defer final action in order not to humiliate Hoar and his followers more than is abso- lutely necessary. Eec.l and the rabid pro force bill men in the house were rearing aud roaring like caged, lions this morning, but both Speaker Heed and Senator Hoar realize that the jig is up, aud the Litter has devised a now wbeme to get hun-clf, tbe adminis- tration and the supporters of soldiers-at-tho- polls generally out of tbe hole which the in their own camp, (lug for them. They now propose to effect a com- promise with the democrats by which the tariff bill can bo disposed of by August 30th. After this tbey desire that the force "bill shall be taken up, with the solemn pledge tbat after a couple of speeches are jnade by Hoar and Spooner, congress shall adjourn with the forco bill pending. This, they argued, would endorse the action of tho hoube and the adminis- tration and leave the issue open for de- Toate on the stump this fall. "What will come of the compound prop- osi tiou it is impossibl e to predict now. However, whatever conies of it, it is merely a blind to cover tho retreat of tho de- feated advocate of the force bill. The democrats are enjooing the fight "between the rival republican chief tans to the fullest extent, but they are taking no part in it. They are in a position now to "dictate terms and it is doubtful Tvhesher tbey would vote to close the de- bate on the tariff bill August 30th in order to postpone the force bill until next ses- sion. There is a growing feeling among "the senators that they ought not to sacrifice the full discussion of tho tariff order to secure the defeat of the election "bill, that they should continue to con- sider the McKinley bill carefully, as they been doing up to this time. Some of them believe that they might defeat the bill if they set about it with that determination. The Census and Congress. One of tho schemes the republican managers liave had on the stocks for the past few months Tvas to get in enough of the census returns to justify them in proceeding to make anew apportionment of members of the lionae of representatives. They believec' tbey could secure by such action a consider- able addition to the republican membership oJ body and of tbe electoral college and take from the democratic side, quite a number of members. But this scheme has now been abandoned. A fact that has cropped out in the declaration of Superintendent Porter that the returns from the several states cannoo be prepared in time to enable congress to make the reapportion ments desired. Probably "the preliminary returns" havi the eyes of the republican managers ti the fact that under a reapportioumont the democrats will make large, even surprising .gains. Take, for instance, the state of Texas It is within probability that she would gain upon the present basis of apportionment five members; certainly the increase will be not less than three. In Alabama there will be an increase of at least three, and there will prob- ably be an, increased number of members, probably four, in other democratic states. On the other-hand, Massachusetts will lose twp jnembers, Connecticut one. and in none of the new states or other republican states will there "be any increase. In short, it is more than a possibility that Tipon the basis of the present apportionment the democrats would gain under the new cen- sus more than they would lose. Motes, Photographer. Sir. Motes, of Atlanta, was awarded Anth- ony's prize of for the best bromide, at the national photographer's convention today. THE TABIFF X.AH> ASIDE were Messsrs. Blair, Cameron, Edmunds, Hale, Hiscock, Hoar, In galls and Sanders. Mr. Hampton, having asked Mr. Frye to allow him to have a bill taken up for action, Mr. Frye declined, and said that he had asked tho finance committee to let him have two davs for the con- sideration of the river apd harbor "bill, and that he should ask tho senate to reioam in session tomor- row until the bill was finished. He did not feel at liberty, therefore, to yield any time for any business. AflKINO roil INRRKASED AI'PBOPRtATIOS'J. A number of committee amendments to the bill were agreed to, including an increase in the ap- propriation for Charleston, S. C., harbor from to Albo increasing tho appropriation for Cape Fear river at and below Wilmington, N. C., from 000 to for OonteiJtnia creek, >T. C-, from to for river up to Smithtleld, X. C.t from to and for Mnekcy's creek, N. from SlO.ww to inserting an item of for river. N. in- the appronnation for tlio Tennes- see river, below Chattanooga, from to PtrSldjiK out several provisions for the improvement oi the Mississippi river from tho passes to tho mouth of the Ohm river, and substituting; lor them the followinp: Im- proving-the MlbSist-ippi river from tlie head ot the paSKUd to the immtu. of the Olno river, including salaries, clerical, oiilce, traveling aiul miscel- laneous expense of tlio Usion, continuing improvcme-iitto which sum hall he expended under the direction ttt the ocret-iry uf war, m accordance with the plans, and reixmiiiieivl.ttAoiis or the mor romtnlSHioii, for im- irovemcnt of river, for building ot levees, tor urvtys, for work Jt harbm-- at llirkman. Ken., t Xcw MadrlO, nt Huleiin, Ark., at Gn-eii- lile. Virkubnrff and Xatrhrz, at )rleans, at tho hfart of tin- Atclntabiya, and lie mouth oi Ked river, and at other localities, in uch a manner, to sin h extent and in sue.li a.M in their opinion Khali promote he of commerce and navigation. siimldr snb-tituto to tho above made in ird to thy river appropriations, they i'JT umKr eontiul of" the Missouri river rjnm tlit'itemof oi Har 1011 arotc between enatoib tit tlif d-tit should pioei od. >.o action w.is taken runt over till tmnoi lock, p. ailjuurni .Jj.O.iO for rnntinuinc; the !m- iiver. a oi tiis-cns- urk :iml N'cw thud in winch tins improve- WRECKS ON THE RAIL, DASTARDLY WORK OF WRECKERS. An ISxcurnton Train Thrown from the Traefc Cars Birdly Damaged and Several Excursionists Injured. DETROIT, August eastbound TSorth Shore limited train on the Michigan Central road was badly wrecked at 5 o'clock this after- noon at A ugusta, Iteport says the limited struck a protruding car of a freight which had been side-tracked. The engine then jumped tho track and crashed into the depot, completely wrecking the building, and, it is rumored that two boys, who wore inside, were killed outright. After striking the building tho online ran a few yards and ex- pUcleil, blowing Fireman Gregg to atoms and instantly killing Engineer McRoberts. The particulars thus far received do not mention any passengers being killed, although the num- ber ot injured is given at from twelve to fif- teen. TRAIN AVKJECKKUS AT WORK. th3 ann mltiifiit, which and the Btnate, at l> .And the Senate (Takes Up the River and Harbor Bill. "Wji-sniNGTON, August the senate Convened this morning, Mr. Quay made a personal explanation as to a remark attributed to him in -the newspaper reports of the republican caucus last njght. been represented as saying he did not wish to have southern members of the houso of representatives yelping at his heels, urged only by the speaker. He had made no such Temark, and had made no reflection on'tbo dis- tinguished presiding officer of the other branch of Mr. Frye moved to proceed to the consideration Of the river and harbor bill. Mr. Edmunds demanded the yeas and nays, resulted 30 yeas to 8 nays. So the bill was up. The republicans voting with the dem- ocrats for the consideration, of the bill were Messrs. Allen, Casey, CuHom, Davis, Dixon, Frye, Manderson, Mitqlieu, 1'owers, Quay, Sawyer, Sher- man, Squire, Stockbridge, Waehbura and Wilson of Iowa. The eight republicans against taking up the bill MONEY FOIl THE KED MAN. Th.e House Adopts the Conference Report on tho Indian Appropriation Bill. "WASHINGTON, August the house, Mr. lelden, of New York, made another uusaoct'ssful tfort to secure the padiage of the tenato Mil granting of to d em employes ti the customs scrviee, Mr. Korr, of lu-suiu- the role of objection in Una hiatanu'. Tho then pi oreed'-d to con Id-ration" if the conference report 011 the Indian appiopria- iou bill. Mr. Cannon, of Illinois, criticized tlie report aq being the extrao: chn.irj one which hail evor submitted during his in the the bill w.vs lulnmtted to the lou-c. he had conceived it to be hib duty to point ot order items m pproprij.tion These items had been stricken out. The senate had agreed to amend- nents aggregating; The house had 11011- curred in these Then this thing happened: The contereni-e report carried tho full bill as it pnsbed the Imnse with the full amount of the senate amendments and ,ore. The bill created a number of ofhuos anil increased a number ot Blr. Sayers ot T( not many new offices been creutPd jll tne line.' Mr. but not many as were create lit wo ira Wo have not caught up with our CrientH vet, but me inj; them eloso. As repoited from thy conference committee tlio mil i> umvioe. extraordmarv, unexampled, cxtiavagant and ought not to lie passed. THE roMMirrr.K ox IIL'LKS IJLAMKD. Mr. Feel, ot Arkansas, one ol the said tlmt It "was amusing to see the gentleman from Illinois criticizinp the son Ate amendments, committee on of which the manw.as a figure, had jriveii the imnittee on Indian affairs a d.iy in court, all the provisions embraced in the h-enate amrnd- its would have been passed in separate bills, The gentleman, as a member of tho committee on h.id declined to give tin.c to the t-omuiitti'o on Indian ullairs, and now hi- found that he h.id ba.wed the limb oir between hinnelf and the tree. THE Mr. Cannon, by unanimous content, called up the senate joint resolution, that thu unexpended balance of the appropriation for the aiil of Mississippi flood sufferers slmll be used to aid destitute persons in Olclalnnna. After the adoption of the amendment provid.iig that money bhall be dUbursed under direction of thosecrctury ot war. the joint ro-olution was passed. The Xat Mt-Ka-j bill V.HX then resumed. A mo- tion to refer it to the mnmiittee on claims v a-< rejected. Yeas, 45; nays, IffJ, the spealcer count- ing a quorum. The vote then rc-cuned on the passage of tho McKay hill, which resulted, 77, nava no quorum, and a cad of the house was ordered, but failed to divulge a quorum. Mr. Thomas, of cousin. ofFernd a resolution dircctinj; the serjeant-at-arms to arrest a-bnent members. am. nvicnit AND Tine AnarxTnus. Mr. liaker, of New York, created Bome little ex- citement "by ofTerinp a'a a substitute therefor a resolution reciting an editorial appearing in the New York Sun of this morning upon a declaration of Roger Q. Mills, of Texas, that "this. "Washing- ton is no place for me." Scarcely had the clerk becrun to rend tlio pre- amble when ho was interrupted by protests from both sides, of the house. Mr. Dockery, ot Missouri, was the first fo put in his earnest prote-t apainst the reading of the pre- amble, anil the speaker suggested to Mr. Baker that he had better withdraw it. But this Mr. Uaker declined to do, insisting that the resolution accompanying the preamble was m order and that the preamble was perfectly ger- mane to the resolution. Mr. Heard, of Mistouri, indignantly reminded the gentleman from Xew York tliat Mr. Mi IK was paired with Mr. McKinley, and Mr. Sayer-s, of Texas, with as much indignation suggested to tho gentleman tho propriety of taking care of his own colleagues. Mr. Baker submitted that his resolution was in order and ought to be read, and the preamble printed in The Record. Mr. not criticize New York mem- bers who are absent? Mi. do. Air. Heard remarked that Mr. Mills had been here until an hour ago. The speaker again suggested to Mr. Baker the propriety of withdrawing his preamble. Mr. Ba'ker said that if tbe speaker desired it he would withdraw his preamble with, pleasure, but the rebolntion was in order. Tho cleric then proceeded to read the resolution, revokes all leaves of absence except those granted for illness or those granted to Roger Q. Mills, and others employed like liiui in an "educa- tional campaign." Jiefore the reading of the resolution was com- pleted, Mr. Green, of Iowa, rose and objected to the clerk proceeding, and his objection was echoed by republicans and democrats Sir. McMillen, of Tennessee, hoped tliat the gentleman would withdraw the resolution. Had he lorgotten that on a previous occasion a resolu- tion offered by him bad been returned to him by a vote of the house? Mr. Heard said tbat if the resolution wont into The Record, he would move to expunge it there- from. Did the gentleman know tbat Mr. Mills bad been in tbe bouse since last Monday, lionora- blv protecting the pair lie had made with Mr; McKinlev, of Ohio. Mr. the resolution goto the com- mittee on rules. BAICEK. PERSISTS OX HIS RESOLUTION. The chair thinks tne gentleman bad better witbdraw tbo resolution. Mr. it go to tne committee on rules. Mr. object. Mr. Sayera said that if the gentleman bad any sense of decency lie would withdraw tbe resolu- tion. Mr. Baker replied that there was not the slight- est disrespect intended to his friend, Mr. Mills, Mr. know better. If you do not you are not entitled to a seat in this bouae. ThespcaUer (disregarding entirely Mr. Baker's resolution) put tbe question on Mr. Thomas's refo'ution, when dilatory tactics were resorted to until 5 o'clock, when the took a recess until 8 o'clock, the evening session to be for tho consideration of private pension bills, Tlie Ttejrro Itenominated. TU-ntetOHrN. C-, Augnst Cheatnam, colored, has been renominated by tbe republicans for congress troiu the second district, the convention having been held at Henderson. Cheatham telegraphed that he was renominated toy acclamation amid great enthusiasm. An Kxcurbion Train on the Baltimore and Oliio Thrown Off- PiTTsiiuiia, I'a., August A dastardly at- tempt was made last night to wreck an Atlantic Citj excursion train on the Baltimore and Ohio road, at a point twinty miles from this city, where the toad runs along Youghlogucny river, thirty feet above the w.iter. Tho train, which consisted of slyupers ;uid ;i biigg.ige car, was crowded v.ith exriirsion'hts ncurtd for the seashore. It was late in gatting away from the city, and was juooeeaiiirf at a rjpid pace to mAkc tip lost time. Near Osceol.i an obstruction Mas en- C'linntcrod. There a terriuc and the -en- trine was thrown over the embankment. The cjrs ran along tin; rail. H tor fllty feet, where they fell over on tliu bmiml tiack toward the hillside, Tho engine wa3 completely wrecked. The casual- ties were: Killc i Yankee Sullivan, of PIttsbiirK, one of tho oide.n eiijrmeers the io.id Daniel (Jocnlwm, cirincor nt rJTe division, wlm riding FOR POWDERI-Y. in the cab: an unknown man, snppnFcd to Le a tramp, riding between tbe t-mler and baggage car. 1- iieiuan King painfully, but not duujrer- omly injured, llo thrown into atreetliirty feet away. The passengerd escaped with slight bruise It is surmised that the intention was k the hi-'-h-cl.i-'s freight train, which usu- i-----1 ,1-----" -----i I licit, f an ubtt. itiiu nut a. a3tbiPit'vo'--terday Four About two hundred men lei on and rails. All thit a completely stopping alltralSc. TJ frj -chtf'i! KHS of life the tact tint the coaches over tbe non-payment of wages. It w.iy irom the rngme, did not t m to thu rivei. had 200 An Accident on tUc Erie. rATKKsnv, J., August serious acol-   his and injury, aUnoivh Uic engine plowed through the ca'ouose and ivio cats lie attempted to apologize rn the titicii lor thu mishap, but lie exdiioiated from all blame, as thero was no to warn him of Jiis. danger. Died of TUeir Injurieg. CiNfjiSN VTI. August dispatch from Lcx- higt'jii, Kj., says Frank H. Smith, baggageinag- ter, and Mr. who were uairt, 111 tlie rollihion niiiht Itfore died last niRht. Mi. Sm.th, thmuih bmlly walked a milo and a hall' niter tho a-jrident, to Spring station, to give notice to a coining train. Didn't Stop at Switch. Conn., AnguBt "Gilt Krtge" B.jstun express on thfl Shore Line, '.vhun near hero did not at a switch a1? it and crashed into an appntar-lung accommodation tr.iln. Nh one killed. Bolli engineers braveiy btucit to their post. _____ A Collision Near Sell en eel ail y. TROV, N. Y., Anpiust 8 train out of Albany collided with a freight train two miles west of St heneetady tonight. Kngineer Isaac Vrooman and his fireman were killed. THE HANGING OF The Central Strikers Think a Compromise Will Be Effected with flto Central. NEW YORK, August of the Knights of Labor expressed the opinion this morning that a compromise fay which the strikers will return to work, with the sacrifice of aa little dignity as pos- sible would be reached when Mr. Powderly and 'members of the general executive board called on Vice President "Webb. From the talk of the rail- road, men, however, 4hia seems to oe overconfi- 1 dence on the part of the strikers, for it is stated, that tlio company will stand by the spirit and let- ter of its statement used last night. General Su- perintendent Voorhees said this morninjr he ivaa tired of hearing about the strike now, and thotignt it was time for every one to agree that it was over. Mr. Vciorhees would not say anything about the probable visit j of Mr. PowUerly to tlio officials. "I do not said he. "tlio purport of his intended visit, and have no idea of what proposals he intends to make. Perhaps he may not come here at all. Now, I don't think there is much talking required. They all know what the com- pany is gouig to do in reference to the, sinkers. we hare acted as fairly as wo could in the matter. We don't need many more men now. The ireipht yard at Sixty-Fifth street is all right again. We will run the last of the old freight oiit today, and by tomorrow we will bo in the barne condition we were before tbo strike took place. While ttill the police around us MC fear no danger, hut it it> just as well to be on tbe safe side ot every- The passengor service in the depot is f ulfy re- TWO 1'lNKr.KTON" KILLED. AI.II.VSY, August {Ludmgton and George It. Rosmlt-r, of Philadelphia, two of J'mk- erton's detectives, stationed ut West Albany, were killed by a- passenger train this morning. They had been to get a drink of water and were returning to their posts at the time. T11K Bits' TIIIIEAT. CHICAGO, August journeyman car- pcnuerr, and bosses are preparing for the fctrike, -which the former, last night, decided to inaugu- rate on September 1st. Each side charges tho other with bad faith. Tlie journeymen Bay the Imsws have broken their agreement in to pay STli cents per hour since August 1st, and tbe bosses declare tliat the carpenters have not kept faith with them, in that they have allowed their men to work for opposition bosses at rates below the schedule. HIE AIU-HRAICr.S CTT. ALB Ga., August air-brake hose" on a Harlem transient, out from Chatham this morn- ing, was found to have beer, cut, and resort was made to the old brakes. Men are at work in tho East and West A'bany yards on a confused mass oi cars. One freight was sent from East Albany at lo oVlock. The strikers are as quiet as ordinary spectators. A STIUKK oy Tin-: WABASH. CiiifAGO, August of the switchmen em- ployed by tbe "Wabash Railway Company in Chi- cago struck this morning and not a wheel is turn- hundred men left their posts, The trouble is has been cus- tomary to pay employes of the road on tbe 13th of each month, but this month the paymaster left St. Louis two days later, so that without rushing i.iatters, be could not uach h cago until Monday next. This was c< .nfmuincited to the 3 ai timaster, in turn, notified tha men this allemoon. As DARNELL FOR CONGRESS sis CAXTOlf. HE IS OPPOSED TO INDEPENDENTS. Otlier Political Wews In Lewis Kcuomihated in Caba- nies for the Senate. Who Killed Captain Owrnoy, Last The Row in the Road. ir LE, Va., in enmity, John Phillips colored, was hnnjfi d lor the br.ital murder of Captain Itoln-rt C. Ovcrbcy, a prominent citizen ot th.it county, on the 12th oi April Tliillips met Overbey in the roul, ami been re- moii'-lr Utd with by Overbuy for boi'iU'ions con- r, sought y good e POLITICS IN SOUTH CAROHIXA. Two Convention Delegates Thrown Out oC the Windovrb. COLUMBIA, S. C., August r, Brayton, chairman of tho republican executive committee of South tin a evening issued call for a state convention to assemble in thia city on the 15th of September. The object of tho convention is not definitely mown. By the time it meets the position of tha tioaa of rho democratic party will be definitely known and probably two tickets will then be in the field. Mr. Brayton has just been nominated for con- Kress from the beventh district. Miller, who has i :ii seated In the place of Elliott also j claims the nomination and the republicans fn f that district have split. The convention was com- principally of negroes. Two of the white delegates who were instructed to vote for Bray- ton and voted for Miller were thrown bodily out of the windows and several men were beaten with clubs. The committee appointed by the struightout democrats, who split from the coavention ycstar- day, this evening issued an address to the peoplo of the state stating their and tlie reasons that guided their action. TELEGRAPH BREVITIES. Bond offerings epted at ft4 for 4 per cents ,md for The Nebraska state democratic canventiott Thursday night nominated James Boyd, Omaha, for governor. A tremendous cloudburst broke Colorado Springs, Col., Thursday afternoon, deluging tha in roots and undermining walls.. Two people were swept away and dro-omed. The bale of South Carolina cotton, of this? year's crop, WAS sold yesterday, at 12 cents pcr> pound, in Columbia. This is nine earlier titan the fir-st bale of season, and two days earlier than for the last seven years. Yesterday's offers for the sale of sliver to tha Government were at rates varying from St.14 ta I.lSVi. Thetreasnry department accepted all lers at prices below Four hnndredacd sev- enteen thousand ounces were accepted, tor cry Phiiadelpnia, San Francisco and Isew leans. Asrecial from Dallas, Tex., says that wbea tbo state republican convention meets in San Amnmo. on September 3d, that it will be controlled republicans, of southern birth, wwo jEorm a white republican party. Ther will de- nounce the forco bill and dQinaad tho Australian ballot iNEWSPAPERr NEWSPAPER!   

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