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Atlanta Constitution Newspaper Archive: August 7, 1890 - Page 1

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   Atlanta Constitution, The (Newspaper) - August 7, 1890, Atlanta, Georgia                               VOL. XXII. ATLANTA, GA., THURSDAY AUGUST 7, PAGES. PRICE FIVE CENTS. IT WASGRUEL. The killing of Kemmlei by Elec- tricity THE FIRST SHOCK IS A FfilLURE. Kemmler Breathes the Cur- rent is Off ONCE MORE fi TRIAL IS MflDE And Death Produced, But the Body L Chaired ViHYT 1HE DOCTORS At n PN N" August f 5 o ol It tin-, tn n I milord drejo-v of the U b r ie 1 e holding 111 o ie hin 1 a list of room lumbers sto 1 in tbe umco t pimg the pub buttons that the electric file be 1 in oath of the rooms indicated up n his list In them were sleeping poisons wh) hal 1 c oc o s in 1 avincn humelly a id w In i di I so tho sin was lading its bars uf ov ci tho citv of Auburn Thesk> was r u 1 ox- the -Mr cool 1111 T. si t bn 070 sw ijc I the tico to s Tlie nun f the re s h 11 been v I the> too ca ne rooj m0 fro 11 tl e r roo 13 t j< in others at coffee an 1 rolls b fo u e to t e rison In tl o pocket of each gut st (t1 e state was a car J I earn) jf the orler of alnus s nn to tho prison an I before inning c ich hai been warned to i 10 ei t 1 i i T. n midur j CM lent n rv ous tt usion w is i at in? tho hnlH and peering and aiix uislv do MI "o the i iron or out ance luipvtient of tho delay The state Ib urhadexj iretl and ft re Dr unvedwith i case of instruments in hand Doctors s'ira 13 and of New k weic je missing Thoj were vet at the hotel table Vt 7 o lock 1 _00 cc nv icts w ould be m uchcd 01 t fi t m tl o moss to tho shors and then tho 1 citing to operate t e dvnamo limn in the 1 >Ft of the marb'e shop could not be run on with int the pnsoners knowing that Kemmler abitit to die Jso one t uld tell what sj mt bo de e ope 1 bj the men m striped clothes if such was forced upon them The agent and war ten therefore grewinomentarilv more impatient lie would have the execution all over if possible, before the men were astir in the shops THF IMP V.TIFNT W VKD1-> I will n it wait loHfirei for th t wl o irt not here 1 oexcl imcd xt length aftt i jeenng the last time down to tho 11 11 gite This altair cannot bo undo sub ect t convenience an 1 I think it unfui t moth it I should have been kept waiting u til this hour TI e biL, clock in tho main hall then marked f o ckck Only thirtj seven minutes were left in wl ifh to take Ivemm'er s life before tho convic s should bo to work Ac juies cu an 1 those awaiting in the cool I luMl about ti o war en wholtd tl e w aj tu the rear hall who c a gnaid vv th a great e stiol to open i.n-1 close the door to tl e region of the prison DOWN IN THF The huge in 11 boltd barrier sw back The Ipd and the silent part-v cle ei dttl the ireu sta rvvay to tho stone fkoiod hall whcic tho fUal apparitus and its first eub ect were waiting The waj lay through a low doorw iv in tho massive basement int a room Umlj lighted as jet b> thecirlj 6 insbine In the semi gloom tho massivo cl ir of death seemed to loom out of tho shal a little distance from the entrance As cacli passed it, he hav e noted that ev erv strap and ev cry buckle to bind the was caiefnl placed to avoid all possible deKj Ihe eloctrxle for the liea 1 hung m its p arc like a sprinkler f ir a shone bath Chairs and benches stood about the room in a semi circle in tho uncor I1 11 light i the fateful room The> formed n 1 01 se siioo in whoso opening stood tho heavj chair with its dandling straps and buckles Down on a window tow aid tho east, a heavv shade was drawn while through tho bars in tbe othei window, tho morning air caiue cool and fresh' through irgmia creepers that swept the lion with a soft, rust ing touch THE [SFCRET Suldenlj the room was lighted from within Tl e warden hid turned up the low burning 1 amo at one of the blackened gas burners on the ai cieiit chandelier In his final arrange jnei ts the warden had placed all tho eloctri cal appaiatus in tho end room wires being run ov er the casement to the death chamber Tl is anteroom tho warden kept carefullv shut BIV e when he or some helper passed in 01 nit In charge there were three men whoir the refused to name The purpose of the late change of the electrical volt meter and sw itch to another room became apparent who should see Kemmler die were never to know who had pushed the switch to send the death bolt to Kemmler's vitals "While the final were being made, Drs Bhradj and Jenkins entered and the witnesses all within the room DRESSING FOR. DEATH Meantime Kemmler in his celt wis being irepared for ending his life He had gone peacefully to sleep early in the night and had slept souifclly and w as snoring until 5 o'clock, he was awakened by one of his Daniel McNaughton Pastor has attended Kemmler, as also the prison chaplain, vere with him They read from the Bible prayed with him He dressed himseh mthout aid in a suit of gray mixed goods About his neck he buttoned a turn-down col- lar with a checked tie of lawn stuff His bair ne combed and brushed with great care His shoes were well polished and while he made himself finally tidy, the warden and a tall stranger, who is deputy sheriff in Buffalo., entered The etranger held by his side a pair of clippers HIS HAXB CLIPPED 1 The warden explained to Kemmler that he saust hare thaliop ot his head shared. The prisoner demurred He hid taken great pains in dressing his hur, and besides, as he ex plained to the warden he did not want to be disfigured He wanted the people to see and know that he was not a man of repulsive ap- pearance, as has been stated Koaimler's hair is dark brovvu and wavy, with a hypenoii curl that fell 011 Ins forehead Of tins he was piouil In the shadow of death his vanity asserted itself Hs hair, cut b it the curl wa-j saved and, as tbe sequel proved, with no good result The spot was two and one qu by one an I "me quarter nn lies in and was not sua en but cioppod furlj close While this was proceeding witnesses ex- inmiutl tho cha r of death the be t was run on tho djnan o iwaj down in the south wing of tho pusr n and the incandescent lamps in tho ancecl a nber glow el faintly 1 Jl K I III I M TL I s, pn O'N Tho turient was on V struige powei "was the in tint Heetncity was there but he w fetblj Ihe lights b lined 1 bus excl i med Dr M icDonald vv IK vv is Die onl> on A wh t i iro tin intci in and that while iniioi int of the win len d ih sire tokctj itssenetsinviolate and n n o to Di MirlKiial 1 s comment Eh trn i in Dav is ro narked tl it there w is so e h nj: w i 7 w xb mt tho i iicliincry (h wii theie itfi lung to the i n t ei d f the circuit 1 h s rr i nr v too'c 11ito before the eketn it is vt'l t n member and was un duublollj is true a few minutes latei when the b lit w is ap} lied to Kemmler the con- dei nt I man hav n T his bur cut on t >p f 1 is 1 ea 1 he listens 1 to tho reading of ti t h ith xn it In tht ir len ho s att s ess s w 10 ie e if ill} tho nr s 01 ci i r i 1 r uid w u 'en T. bo man was c cl ml i in T ijiat'ietic Ihelast mimic i 1 t H lowtve" via diheioditea bj t! e b1 in 1 ed 10 of tho man f ice IS HUE DFA.1H (H Cue Jlill roniman Ie 1 the wii Ion, when a 1 h i i 111 n tl i m the cell an 1 the htt 3 1 irtv if fun vva len r si IK r ana clei-fj men p 1 tho antoi c m t 10 cloc ti i1 a] L i uiec an 1 the war Uii 1 the wav. nnillv int) tic Ualh ebailci behind him r od the 11 in he on i TV ould kill lusl mis sw tin-, it his s de save w 1 in as tl in some t inbirriSbMH lit, 1 e sti >1 i 1 his brown full b irlai Inu-.tie1o as he confronted the white expect int f i es of twenty five nun win bjaides the warden should soon see bun die Mr D irstnii lac 1 L p) nn w oo U n 1 tt i c an dnectiy in front of the o t.r ch t i an 1 halt Kemmlei sit upon it He tic ed LCtilv Ther6 was no un easiues a' out his movements He seated himself loisurolj 1 bore was no MIS tei sion i] parent indeed, not ncarlj so mm h is among tho inni about him He was ap p uontlj tho most pcisoi in tho room 1 be warden took a place beside Konimler after the latter 1 let omo seated in tlio kitelu a ch ur i 1 for him resting h s arm j over the pusonei s shoul lei on tlie chair back Hoi his hat in 1 and the warden liresented tho condemned man to those present INTl IN  of stuff about me tint am t so That w as all Tho pusoner glanced his shoul ler xs ho cease I SJ caking and Durston time to his side Take oil jour coat Bill said ho Kemmier readilv did a" lo was told The warden then cut II the ttom of bis shirt so to adjust the e ectiodo to Ins naked back HFMMI f PKKt TI I COOI Kemmler w as more ct mposed than tlie at ten 1 ints who wt re adjusting the apparatus, aid him to tho chair Once or twice he tol 1 t) cm to take tl en time and tako it eisv His appt ar inco and manner disproved all --t UK nts that tho man was insane or in a flabby state of ui jeetion It took seven nnnuLos to complete all arrangements IV ING 11IK SIGN VL The w aidon then turned and nodded, his at some one w ho st >od 111 the seciet room at the fatal switch Iheio was a quick con ulsn e start the b< ind figure in the chair, and a httlo sijuoikin., sound of straining stiaps After that convulsive start that marked the saoke of lightning upon Kemm lor, there w as no mov emcnt of muscle nor twitch of nerve SPFClATOrS IIORIITFI1 B At the oxpii iticn of seventeen t-econds the current was cut off "While the physicians were examining Keramlor in one minute a id fortj seconds after tl o current had stoppe Kemmler chest begin to heave staitlinganil hornfjins the spectitois Ibe doctors, de clared however that the man was "beyond consc ousnoss and some tl ought the action which stirtled all and sent the warden away with a white face to order the current re newed, w as only a reflex of muscular acti on Not so with one phj sician, who dec ared that he would stake his namo that lie could bring Kemmler back to con- scious life vv ith brandy hj podermics A VKWS1AP.ER MAN t V.I'STS 111 the meantime G G- Bun, a Washington newspaper man had fainted and lay upon a be in h where he was being fanned With the renewal of tho current the nguro in the chair again strained ;ts straps but the lungs again filled The warden and nis electrical helper were aniious bejond measure and two and one quaiter m nntes after tho current had been reappUcd the notch was opened and shut rap- id! j twice TWISTED OF SHAPF Fach time the body in the chair was lifted by the shock The shoulders lifted to a lei el of the top of the ears and the features con- tracted Then smoke was observed curling from Kemmler s back The body was still and the current was again turned off He's unquestionably said DrTMnc- Donald 'and he would never have after the spasm of the first shock had the cur- rent been maintained twenty seconds, and less time with a stronger current EXAMINING THE BLOOD One of the Buffalo doctors, seven minutes after the straps were removed, cut the skin at the temple for a microscopic specimen of the dead man's blood It was immediately ex- amined and found slightly coagulated "While the witnesses were yet examining bis body, or conferring with each other upon the event of tho murderer's death, "Warden produced his death certificate, which was read and signed by each witness of the execution To inqoined as to the pressure of the current when first applied, to Kemmler, Warden Durston replied, "about volts." As to the pressure oil the other Warden was not clear But a mail who came into the room while these questions ore being asked and who is said to have been one of tbe tbieo men. who worked the olccittral apparatus m i'e tl.e statement that olt r at the m  Cailos I1 McDonald, C and William J Jenkins, of Isew and C M Daniels of Fuffalo Tho doctois prep u e 1 i j r fi ci U stite i ent gn 11 g the ie- sailts in detail 1 lu v all tl at un consciousness was mi' irodiut 1 and death liiiiucss than Jing some slight defect in tho electi c il M itus winch retjuued a bccond eoiiiaet 01 the curiunt to insure death 1HI U( t H VKttKD ch of tho bod5 at points of coi 11 t of U c e'et tiouea was found also min- ute o K hage in ho or MS membranes and in tl o s n tucks of tlie 1 ram The blood was fluid n 1 c In the lo sums coircs pond ng wi h the K u ol cuntict the blood is t 11 bun lie c was a dt cu'e 1 change in tho i n is m 3 and color of the br un coi ies] omhiig w itn tno i omt of contact I e btruetne ehan0ea of blu >d eorpusc'es were noted KMMIMNG THlL H.M atn n ol the tlecti odes on the fatal cha-ir lisclo ed that the at the base of tho sp no w is sit rcl e 1 by the heat generated own 4 to i 111 feet or tact or tomauflicient wet ing of the sj t nn the contact Thoiesult w is a ten ble 1 i imnu of the back clear t e it Lh< sk 11 in contact had bt  from his brain The fie that how is n t n sta itlj kill" 1 is die result re ultof n H r nt ict-cf mstifhcient voltage 01 pn silt re lie cont ict certainly was not perfect at the head >r tw o thirds of the coil tict was upon tho nmn a thick, smoothly blushed hau the elij ped si ot being one third tlu c i i-he eletlio lc> dia i etcr Ihe e n 01 sus of Ojiun n among the wit- nes cs 1 f re toilaj is that not tho si ghtcst d tibt sts but that a human being inaj be instintlj kilet 1000 vt Its applied through perfect conttet and continued twenty seco ds II 1 (f Ke iimlcr will doubtless be dis jo el f toin irnv in tho prison burjing I with i i ckhme to lu.sten dissolution DH SHI Dr blind} who is ulitt r ofTho MediraltRe coi I tonight 1 od an editonal to his piper Jrom A 1 ieh some cxtiacts are here tn TLi. k i icned of suspense regarding tlie effii Kit if tUctmitj a means ot etecnt ng em m; Ii is final 1> terminated in the legal oi KI i i il i was rcasonablj antif jnt il <1 all was nstortancous and, so i u is t in be  iutthinL. else to 1 e tlio if tl in the mrro tjniekiiess been tn uni] h i d ne tin of the rrimtnal thir ii c the i rep ir iM us i HI t he terrible is umpired tl tint of Itleetmifs a serious   iij loo dear a. j riee for iiurtint-mLOUH neii iti n The rj of th ire inteusitit lath in I told in antieipa tion of w tat this instrument of sub tic i mver in iv do as compared with eitl er the noo e (I i rope the jf a the smart of a knout the bolt ot i 1 ulkt or thr ciup (f ax andjctti Iiarneab 11 1 bo t itttrtugh a human body is thought to b one of the usances of the nine tcci th tciitury -v] (lien es in the Kciumler ease in BI ite of all prtt ons taki n Ii si inanj ditli cuUies in the of a (.tncral adoption of the metbo 1 It IB far from sin pie in its tpj Ii cat on It re uii r Belabor ite ind cirtful prepar at ion it multi; ic mi hnierj which without ex lert minip tlati n is liab e t) fail in its working n I 1 r ilia tt us resirfts U ma> Ic a in ot t) rxteutiontrs anil siieetat rs Jt me re s the i cnse >t utions nut worst tl m all 111 the ne n of tlie ictim the re is il i p n save those of being thrust Into the muzzle jf a Ii aded canm n r r tied t a bonil Kccorci of Kemmlei s Life R.emmler was a man of low mental and moral quaht os The surroundings of his birth and eaily life were erj ba 1 His father was a butcher in Philadelphia where William, the mur Icier, was born in The boy grew up in tbe shambles and in the market place His parents sent him to school for a brief period, anil several Limes he saw the inside of a church and bcaid the service there These feeble in fluencos constituted the only contact the boy and man er had with things pure or good Ivcmmler s was a life that grew rankly On no side did it bear the impress or polish of any training or efforts to ennoblement He was a sample product of conditions existing today in all large cities He worked in the slaughterhouse with his father then he became a bnckjard worker, and finallv he became a huckster on bis own account Of his rascally devices to cheat cus- tomers while huckstering Kemmler since hia imprisonment has told with chuckles and much gusto In 1887 Kemmler married a worthless woman named Ida Porter, in Camden, Hew Jersey Two days later he found she had been muslj married, and he left her to e with MatiHa They to Buf- falo, N X Kemtnler frequently found his mistress purloining money Iroin Ins clothing, and he sufapecled infidelity on her pait They quarreled blow s wore exchanged, Kemmler became a hopeless drunkard On the moruing of March 29 1880, all Buffalo was shocked by the news of the brutal butcherj of a woman at No Division street The woman killed "Tillie and the murderer was the Phila- delphia butcher's son, Kemmler The murder was the first that had been committed in the state of New It ark after the law to kill murderers by electricity bad become operative Kemraler was arrested and in tl e mean- time the unfortunate woman was removed to the hospital Her face, arms and breast were covered with blood, and she was   as ided b> the code, at Aubuin state prison Counselor Hatch took exceptions to the- upon the ground t! it tho punish njent was cruel and unusual and contic.rj to the spirit of tho constitution Kemi ilcr reach 1 Aubiin May 24Lb, at niidn Jit of h ibe corpus was served uj on "Warden Duistou [U-st before the fatal da> armed and upon June au ex o argument was hoard by County Judge Day 1 he who'e argument was as to Jie constitutionality of the law substituting elec- tricity for the gibbet upon tho ground of the former be ng cruel and unusual Judge Day dis missed the writ, and case was taken to the general term of the supremo court at Roches ter w here the coustitutioii-Uity of the law was upheld Tho last resort was the court of ap peals, and here, too, the decision was ad verso to Kemmler s counsel The criminal was resentenced to die in the wee beginning April 28, lb' 0 It is likely ICemmlor would have been electricized on Aprifaoth, but on the a United fotates writ of habeas corpus was on the warden, and the case was then can- cd to the "United States supremo court on the point of constitutionality of the law on tho sime grounds as urged in the atato courts The York courts were upheld in the final ap- peal, and Kemmlei was again sentenced to be killed in the Vveek beginning August 4th TJio Source of the Death Current By a small window in a lot above the marble fihops in Auburn prison is rigged a dj namo which takes power from the shoo below It is a fiftv horse pow er machine, which is the me- chanical force, allowing for waste in gearing and transmission, deemed necessary to main tain fifty of the arc, or big white street lamps. 'the qualifications of this dynamo are Commercial voltage (force current) 1 fOO Mean 1512 Maximum 2 1 G Speed (revolutions of armature) I 500 This machine IB so constructed as to gener- ate what is known as an alternating current In lay terms it may be said that in alternating current dynamos the e'ectnc force undergoes rapid periodic changes being one moment at zero, increasing to maximum, diminishing to zero, then, reversing in direction it again rises to a maximum, to fall again to zero The of these rapidly changing strengths is sometimes called the electio-inotive force of the dynamo Tho Auburn machine is capable cl about 230 of these reversals cry second or about minute. When applied to thociuninal, as in Kemmler's the'ie i ip idly alternating throbs have each about the physical force necessary to lift U7 pounds ORB foot in second The e i ollj nnd tissues are behoved to be racked and smitten first in one direction and then another by this terrific and mysterious force about 14 000 ciy minute It is like beating an object with a heavy hammer alter mtely on either side with great force very ijy idly In the caseof tho e cells aie to be torn from tbe glands, or the ganglia, E has stated under oath that one tenth of an ami ere (the electucal unit of quantity) and (a being the electrical unit of pressure) ould be-enough to kill a man If Edison is right then the silent machine in the loft of the prison marble shop has within its mjsterious thews the generative power to de< imate a great city m an mcitdibly short space of time A iifty horse power machine would produce a q iintity equal to !7 amoeres at a pressure ol 1 000 volts If Fdison'ss atement that a tenth of an ampere at volts will kill human life then the machine which was used on Kemmler might destiojed JfiO other men at the same moment it did Kemmler There are, however well infonned electricians who will not fully accept Kdiscns figures but the) say the conditions ho names might" result in death However, there is ample margin above the force required to kill, for the dynamo has a possible force of 2 000 olts which, -while it reduces the quantity at a gnen pomt of t'ie circuit at agi-ven instant of time means double tl e pressure cited bj idison as effective for oToctriciying purposes The effect of increas- ing voltage is like that of placing an men noz e on a four inch pn e through which water is fk w nig A qn intitj of w ater w ould escape each instant but its force would be vastly in- creased indicated, tbe dynamo in, use is of vastlj greater power than that needed to kill one man A machine that could be placed in a waste basket might be constructed to do all that is required If allowance is male for loss in the friction of ing and in tho pr  namo might be co'istruete 1 which might be oper ated one minute by a weight of ibout eight hundred pounds falling ten feet ng this time electrical energy sufncient to kill a man in from one to ten seconds would be genera ted This possibility is cited to bring to the lav mind a more and practical apprecia tion of mechanical force involved in the kill ing of a human bemgjby elcctncitv Jb roin the dynamo in the loft of the marble shop 111 Auburn prison, heavy wires lead through a cauge ou the w all up to the top of the building which is known as the south wing Thence they trail along the roofs, over the main part of the prison, and cieep their wav stealthily the that the prison front, down to the basement and through asquaie window into the fateful loom The Electi icizlnc Chair Since its construction, under direction of "Warden Durston, the chair in which Kemmler sat to be killed has been in care of a comict clerk in one of the prison departments He held the keys to the storeroom in which the chair was hidden, and guarded it with great care Convicts made it, a convict kept it from curious inspection To bring it from its hiding place was the list act of preparation for Kommler's execution The chair is not of horrid appearance It has no lines of beauty, bat with its foot-rest it affords a comfortable position to the occupant There 13 not a curved line on its sturdy frame t, pright and cross bars, arms and rungs are of heav j hardwood, square and straight And the arms of the chair' They are wide, very wide Not for comfort of the occupant, no Why then See the broad, y buckles on the outer lower edges, and the equally "broad stout straps on the inner one where the wrist falls, the other where the elbow would rest These might bind a fore arm very, vorj close to- tbe broad chair arras Tbe chair has a perforated wooden seat The side posts of the back reach, above here a human liead would rest There are more buckles, too, and straps on these posts just be- low where the shoulder would rest, to pinion the upper arms The central rest togthe back is furnished by a stout, broad bar of wood at the top of which, above the Batter's head, is mortised.in a stoat stick which is braced, from above Tlio outlines arc nearly those of the Through tlie stick thug projecting forwardfronxthesitter'sfleadis a one-fourth, inch iiole directly above tho It is fl lit- tle aperture, yet through it passed the current which was the agent of Kemmler's death Tlie back bar, crowned with its minature yibbet, is mov able, up or down, through irin jollar-clarnps at the back of the seat and of the head rest Through the hole in the projecting stick abov e the head is passed the heavy wire stem of the electrode iliat rests upon the head, and through which Che death current flows Opposite tho base of the spinal column another hole in the upntjht back bar admits the current wire to the other pole and its electrode The electrodes are heavy vet flexible rubber cups, about four inches in diameter, and hiving inside a copper disc or coil of copper this a coil The heavy cunent ire is introduced into the rubber cup through the apex, and is connected w ith tho wire coiled around the inside of the cup A sponge is fitted into the cavity of the cup cloaely against the wire coil The sponge will hold a gill of wa er One e'ectroJe is pressed down upon the head of the criminal, clinging somewhat, because of exhaustion of air Hi us, when tlio e ectrodo is m position, there is practicalH only a gill of water between tlie wire coil and the subject s tlesh The sponge is the ultimate conductorof the charge nud dripping with one of nature s best con ductors, fitseverj wrinkle, into pore ovei everj Contai t is per feet upon the skin previously saponined Fastened to the head rest is i pad, insulated with rubber, fashioned to ht the es of the neck and upper spinal column 1 he criminal's held ib drawn back hard and lit into this neck sa-ld'e by the heavy leather mask that nts the forehead shades the 03 es and envelopes the chin, but leaves the nose and moutli exposed There are straps upon the mask that buckle abuut tbe upright central bar Ihe head is nxod and fast The axnis are pinioned, the wrists the elbows, the legs are bound, a stout broad strap circ es the waist and holds it fast the electrode for the head is connected through the stick projecting above tbe head the other thiough the bai to the bared base of tho spine, and the occupant of the chair has been made part of a circuit through which when the cur- rent is switched on, fiashes the force that kills Successful use of this means of death de ponds upon perfect contact of the electrodes Imperfect contact causes burning of the flesh and slow and awful dissolution The phjsical fact in such a cose would bo that the current flowing continuously is dammed up when it reaches the skin by imperfect contact of the conductor with it The current hurrying for- ward with terrible force and great volume must be expended This must be done m light or heat In a case of electriciymg by the methods employed it would expend itself in heat an arc or break being formed, and burn ing of the flebh would result By use of the sponge electrode as explained, perfect contact is secured and instant death is certain The Chamber of Death Once the are now more than 1 200 in Auburn 111 the space w hicli is now the room where Kemmler died It used to be part of the niessroom Is ear one of its high square windows tho writer once saw ex Bank President Fish, atanarrow shelf run mng along the wall, eating bis pUte of beans and tin mug of soup The room thus taken from the mess hall is about eighteen bj tw euty feet in size A b ith tub and sink are in one corner The walls and ceiling are white the floor is of stone, the ceiling is ten feet high, and tLe two windows eastward look out upon the beautifully kept lawn within the twentj foot high prison wall 100 feet on the street 1 hrough the heav y iron barred gate people passing in the street mav bo seen trom the w indows of tho death room The front window s, tbe sills of which touch the lawn without, are iron banod and heavy wire netting is also placed icioss them The fres.li green of newly creeping vines droop down over the lintolb On the other side of the room aie tw o guarded openings upon tho c r idor thiough which the convicts shumo, shuffle and trxmp tramp to their mess-room fare Shades are drawn over these windows one coniei of the room it a low broad and j d6or It oj ens into a short corridor leading to tho sohtarj cha. nber with its iron cage where Kemmler awaited death, and where, doubtless others will do tbe same An old fashioned chandelier di ips from the ceiling and reaches out two rusty arms m awkward curves to hold at the end of each a blackened gas burner Between the windows 011 the street side of the room the wall is, faced with matched boards to hold the electrical apparatus The wires from the distant djuanio lead in through the corner window to a meter fastened against the boaid facing B> this the swiftness of the death current was measured On the ciicmt it. also a case of twenty four in- candescent lamps These lamps glow w hen. tbe current is there, and give a tangib'e assur ance that the silent agent of death is throb bing along the coppei arteries At the right of the lamps is a switch which when shut, closes or completes a siib-circmt lights the lamps, but does not invoH e the death chair and its appliances The current in this circuit is reduced so as not to overflow or burn out the lamps by means of an instrument know n as the redm toi Quite near and at the right of the lamp switch is the all potent switch ot the main cir cuit The lever is about fourteen inches long and has a rubbei handle, that tho execu tioner may not be electriciyed instead of the criminal m the chair Ihe closing of tl is le'ver into the metal jaws, that it es tabhbhes a circuit through tho electrodes at the chair From the ceiling near tlie ancient gas fixture depends the death cam nig wire, the criminal sitting with his right .side to the street win dow s facing northward Tho back of the chair is toward the door where the criminal enters so that walking obliquely from the door he takes tho seat without turning A button on the wall, when pressed sounds a signal in the djnanio room the belt is put on the machine to innocently do its terrible errand, and upon signal it may be at once turned off after its woik is done Text of the Statute. The and more interesting sections of tho law (Chap 4S9, Laws of IbSS) prov idmg for execution by electricity are as follows "When a defendant is sentenced to tbe pun- ishment of death, the judge oi judges holding the court at which the conviction takes place, or a majority of them, of whom the judge pre siding must be one, must make out, sign and deliver to tbe sheriff of the countj p warrant stating the conviction and sentence and ap- point the week within w Inch sentence must be executed Said warrant must bedmcted to the agent and wirden of the state prison of this state designated bj law as the p ace of confinement for coniicts sentenced to irapus- omnontm a state prison in the judicial district wherein suc'i com ictaon has taken p'ace corn mandmg such agent and w arden to do execu- tion of the sentence upon someday vuthm the week thus appointed Within ten dajs after tbe issuing of such warrant, the said sheriff must deliver the deiendant, together with the warrant, to the agent and warden of the state prison therein mined trom the time ol tbe said delivery to the said agent and warden un til the inffhction of tlie punishment of death upon nun, unless he shall be lawfully dis- charged from such impnso iment, the defend- ant shall be Icepfc in solitary confinement at said state prison, and no person, shall be al- lowed access to him, without an order of tho court, except the officers of the prison, his counsel, hiS phvsicianj a priest or minister of religion, if he shall desire one, and tho mem- bers of his "The week so appointed must begin not less than four weeks and not more than eight weeks after the sentence The time of the execution within said week shall be left to the discretion of the agent and warden to whom the warrant is directed, but no previous an- nouncement of the day or hour of the execu- tion Bhall be made, except to the persons who shall be invited or permitted to be present at said execution as hereinafter provided. "The pmuannjent of death, must, ID, oyery case, be inflicted by causing to pass througfr tbe body of the convict a current ol electricity of sufficient intensity to cause death, and the application of such current must be con tinned until such com ict is, dead It 13 duty of tho agent and warden to be present at the execution an-i to ite the presence, by at least three previous notice of a justice of the supreme court the district attorney, and the sheriff of the county where n the conviction iv as had together with two phjsicians and twelve reputable citizens of full age, to be selected by said agent and warden Such agent and warden must at the request of the criminal, permit such ministers of priests or clergymen of any religious denomtiiatiou, not exceeding fwo to be present at tho execution and in addition to the pe-sous designated above ho may also appoint en assistants or deputy who maj attend the execution He shall per- m t no other person to be present at such execu- tion except those designated 111 tl is section Immediately after the execution a post! mortem eiimmatitii of tho body of tl e en vict shall be made by tho phjsicians present at the execution an 1 the r re pert in writ'ner, stating tho nature of tlie examination so m ido bj them shall be annexed to tlie certificate hereinaftei mentioned and filed therewith After such post mortem examination the body, un less claimed bj some relativ e or relatives of the person so executed shall ba inteired in the graveyard or cemetery attached to tho prison with sufiicieut quantity of quick- lime to consume such body without delay and no religious or other ice3 shall bo held QT, er tlio remains after such execution except within tho walls of the prison where said execution took place and only in the presence of the ofticera of said prison the person conducting said services ami the immediate familyatvlie ativea of said deceased prisoner Ko account of the det uls of any such execution, beyond the statement of the fact that such convict was on the in question dnlj executed accord- ing to law at tho prison, shall be publ shed in Am person who shall violate or omit to comply w ith any prov. ision of this any new spaper section shall be guilty of a misdomeinor Dramatic Incidents in Passage of tlie Haw. Dramatic scenes attended tho passage by the New legislature of the measure under which Kommlcr today suffered death. The bill came from the hands of a commis- sion which "had been appointed to consider a change in >iew s method of executing murderers It was first presented in the as- sembly and graj haired of the electoral clnirman of the assembly's judiciary committee, had assumed itb cham- pionship It was a winter night and the great capitol thronged A measure which should abolish tbe noose and the gibbet was to ba placed on its final passage 111 the and Oh irles T feixton, an able lawjer and i re- spected man woul i make the chief speech in its behalf Tint a struggle would be made against tbe new f angled notion b> those who ilwajs oppose innovations was well known Ihe committee hearings on tlie bill bad fore- shadowed this Ihere was another and a more powerful influence to be pitted against tho measure, for it was well known that tho t atholic members woula bitteilv oppose the cl nises of tbe bill which co tlie mur- derer s remains to the prison with nck- hme to hasten dissolution, and that w thoufi religious cry member was in his place The floor, the gillenes and the spcikti s i latfoim even held curious spectators Ihe bill to substitute) the mjsterious foice of elcctr city for the ropo was moved and Saxton still in his place in tbe brilliant chamber made his plea for its passage Then camo the bittle, and it wag hotl> waged Ridicule and taunts wore leveled at the commission w Inch framed the of them s ttiug be-mlo Mr Saxton Men grow aiigrj some insulting, others used vicious sar- casm and at oach ons aught the grav ha red ton vv i th in lieeiit voice and keen 111 md stool readj Kmallj, within t 11 the bill  v e to amen 1 concluded "Wr I ongley, that friends or relatives may reclaim tho bo ly of tho exocuti d man 1 litre was both hcait and brain in the re- sponse to this lion a man bv his crime forfeits Ins life to the state siioke Mr Saxton, ti e st ite has uudoubte 1 right ti d spose of the inuidcror a bodj as public pohcx mij direct fiat com- fort can be th >so who lov ed th< crimi- nal view ii 0 tho iins which in life bad. faile 1 of self rcij ert and winch in death beat the stamp of tho stues righteous desecra- tion9 I In Chicago continue 1 tho speaker bodies of executed criminals were CM oscd to relatives and to the puulie and that city was brought verv, close to an insurrection Public policy would hav e bet 11 bett n of the sacred sorrow for the dead soldier with tho passion of regret over the corpse of a dead murderer0 Interest of the crow ded chamber w as too tense for cheers The crow d just waned in silence This was broken by anticipa- tions as Mr since as senator, passed the payment to speak It was km vvn that he wculd voice the Catholic opposition to the bill baitl ho I1 hold that where relatives claim tho re- mains the state bas n> to relain them. Fropertj exists in human bodies and [and his voice bill takes awaj the of burial in consecrated mid Hole was tbe challenge made bj religious convictions Consecrated ground' thundered Saxton. Is tho plea here nn Ie that hardship follows retention of a en mm U corpse from conse- crated ground9 The tnmiaal who in life would lift respect tho riesb protected by the law he broke may not m death de- manded for it that which himself had fort feited shouted Mr Roesch, "was not the bodv of Christ stamped with the mark of tho law's desecration, not afforded de- cent burial9 The inquiry was launched upon the air with, vehement emphasis Theie was not a sound in the chamber where hundreds wane 1 in sus- pence to eatoh tho response feaTtoii stood a moment with bowed head his face as white as his hair, and then tossing back h s locks hko a mane with quivering lips and reverent tone he aaid I will not stand hero to in wer a question based upon the association or tlie holy baviors memory vv ith that of men uttd by tho stite of Isew Vork ft r murder He looked squarelj into the face of Mr. Roesch, who had renjamei' but who, after a moment of intense st 'Incss, slowly re- sumed his ceat The tension on the listeners was relaxed the bill went through with some and was sent to the senate After a less dram uic historv there it passed and G-ov crnor Hill siguetf it It took effect Jaruarj 3 and Keinm'er was farst to commit murder m thia state after that da.c, hence, nrst to puffer death under its provisions Inception of tlie Haw In 188G the legislature of !New "Vork became 1 interested m the subject of capital pumsh- t ment and its methods and a commission was authorized "to investigate and to report at an. early date the most bumane and practical method known to modern science of carrying sentence of death in capital Constituted this. Three. SPAPLRl SPAPLRl   

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