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   Atlanta Constitution, The (Newspaper) - May 15, 1890, Atlanta, Georgia                               PRICE FIVE CENTS. Jl REVOLUTION 7 IS WHAT IT MEANS. THE FLDBRAL ELECTION LAW Will Cause the Upheaval of Popu- lar Government AND BRING ABOUT ANARCHY. The Result of Republican Party Desperation. TON Invu -t i, 1 rcsj f n 1 in it May U ]-As I over anl over this cor the republicans are eletermn ed .naU lei tion law hsha.1 not eHpsed after the re- against thirty-one southern democrats Their names will be withheld from the rolls, thus g Miig the republicans contiol at the organiza- tion, and once installed in power it is idle to hope that ail) sense of justice and right will make them vote to oust themselves from the control TrfK FIGHT WILL BE IN THE SFNATR This is the all important question with, the people of the south just now The passage of this bill will work an injury to the entire south The members and senators here realize that and will exert every effort to kill the measure However, under the house rules, and with Reel, himself, engineering it, there is, verj little chanre of dercatniR it there In the senate the great hght vv ill be made, but in the event Senator Sherman's advice is and a ote is f< reed, tlwii the bill w ill be come a law, for IlaTri-on.in his message, recommend- ed it and will sign it Indeed it looks now tint we are to have a national election law forced upon us and the old reconstruction iv s m the south are to a cert i 11 extent, to be gone through with ngain E W B THE SUB-TREASURY SCHEME DISCUSSED. MACUNE EXPLAINS THE PLAN- Roswell P. Flower Urges Many Objections LIVINGSTON'S TODAl Ben Terrell Talks on the Rela- tions of Political Parties at i 1 to r pe 1 that gk and Vv! <3enir Tc the respoc ab'e people of i tl rovvn oil after joars of Strug V" was first talked of in the the denneritic loaders ilarmed They relied not s, vpers t umsly s U'en ehaiii.e of sentiment I HI Ii.lt ON Bli PUTV. I1FSIAIE ,t ,s no the of smash pu.edents of a centurv to build up outh The re, ublicans ale their vvholi i'e extravagance with subsidies nnd b unties ,s eeheed bj ominous rumblings In the east an in tie- vvc-t the i sui p >rt is crumbling ami thej st. i 1 faie to faeo an o crvvhelmiiig defeat at tho l oils next fill Conservative estimates of the demo- cntc nnjou.j in the next house range f mm tvv t ntj fis e to hftj C mler such cirtuni stances a federal eleetim law, designed to thwart the the. cople has bccc me in. verative Spciker Hied and Headsman sounded the alarm at s bainuot three weeks ago and tho leaders on the house side hive determined that a federal elcctio law must ho passe 1 before tins session closes HiOS AND YRCHY 4IIFAD When thej d i ass sueh a law, it isgomg to rock the very Mmdation of tins creito chaos and anarch} m the south fii....sh another era 01 reconstruction sc n.dals and .crimes and precipitate r.ots. in the south cer- 11111 of leplorable results ahe ittempt to i ass it through congress will 01 e it a ill contest the most bitti r that has bi e ii w itncsscd since the daj A LIQlOn BII.I, FN THI. SENATE. to stitos Power to Iteeulaie TrafKc IVHliln ThfW- ASHiNGio's May U the senate tho bill with a nondments, imported liquors to the provisions of the laws of the seveial states, was reported from the com- mittee and p'aced on the calendar The amen luieiit is practically a now bill, and pro- that no state shall bo held to be limited or restrained in its povv er to prohibit, regn'ate control or tax the sale or trausnortatioii (to be delivered within its own hunts) of any ds tilled fermented or other intoxicating liquors, bj reason of tho fact that the liquors hav e been imported into an) state from beyond its limits whether there shall or shall not have been i nil thereon any tat, dutj or import to tin L nitod States Mr ol lovva submitted a report irom the juitienrv committee on m w'liell it was stated that the purpose ot it is to grant the permission of congress to the several stites to ex ei ate their laws to protect society and promote its best interests This mil the rep >rt s lys is clearlj within the suggestions of the decision re ccntly rendered by the I nited supreme court in tho original package case and the committee recommend the passage of Uie hill Mr George did not concur with the rnajontj in their repi rt Mr I loir made an extended explanation of the lull mil Messrs "Vest 1 hnuiuls on of I >vv i had s i ict'img to say al out it when Mr lliiniud siicil to know what qu -ti m wastcfiK the einte and was mf irnuil Iv thi vice presi d lit tint Hell WAS no i.iustl n noiulin. He then d mm 1 d the ieci 1 ir orili r nnd when Mr H >ir ills r d to make s me further rem irks Mr 1 lumb objected aud insisted on tho regular PRESBYTERIANS MEET IN ASHEYILLE. THE POINTS OF DIFFERENCE Betweea the and South. PROPOSED ORGANIC UNION Rendered Uncertain By Knotty Questions. 14 Ma- cune, representing the Farmers' Alliance, thjs n oniing conti med his argument begun J es- day, before the vvajt, and means committee, m avor of the PicUer bill to establish a sub treas- ry for the receipt of agricultural products Ho as questioned hj members of the committee espoctmg tho details and probable effect ot lebill Mr Baj lie wished to know if one ei- ct would not be to encourage ovorproduc- on Dr Macune replied that it woi Id iiot.ior ust as soon as the farmers' calling became ions profitable than others there would be an illnx of men into that business, vv h eh would esult in a react oil and Dually the restoration .f in equilibrium To his mind no fixed olume of no matter how greatj- rould meet the needs of agnculture It v anted an elastic medium The farmer soM lib crops m the fall when prices were the low- est and bought his supplies before harvest v'hen prices were highest Crops were marj ketod in two or three months of the jear afl.a this marketing annually caused a great stiin- ;eucy in mono} MR FLOWER'S OPPOSITION Mr Flower feared that the plan would lead to banking on live shoats, iron, lead and silver ore They were getting along now m the lat- tei direction at the other end of the capitoL In time w e vv ould hav e ev erything in hock In the course of ten years, tho government vv ould be nursing children and w omen work- ing in tho iie'd The true remedy for the farmeis ills was the manufacturers' plan. because such Jaws provide for the continuance of the tramc and f urnisli no protection nst its ravages, that the proper at- titnde of the Christian toward the drink should be uncompromising opposition, and that voluntary total abstinence is tl.e sole and true ground of personal temperance, and the com- plete legal prohibition of the traffic is the duty of tne government The report went to the calendar, and willnodoubt cause much debate when it comes up for consideration The remainder of the session vv as devoted to routine matters THE KENTUCKY DEKET. John sof Andy introduced son Ihe b 11 izrnd upon is the one Iv H M seiitativeKovvell of Illinois, last In It is a composite of the Hoar bherniaii anillol e hills with several features even more ra lical than any contained 111 those bills It like an elastic tape measure capable ol being stretched to cover anj majontj the democrats maj turn up at the next election bv shutting out enough soutlrern members to giv o the republicans control at the organiza mi of tho house 1 he bill reiiiiresa docile 1 explanation to Jnllj set forth its far re idling character It piovides that upon the petition of 100 sq of anj congressional district the d s triet in i e shall orilei the election of congress- men to I e held tinder the provisions of this act At tl e verv outset therefore it is evi denf th it the law is dos giied to operate onlv in tho south for if 100 peti timers from one party should ask lor fcmril supervision at a congressional elec ion 111 the north it would show iho lack ot conn leuce m the local ofticers which the people v, ould promply repudiate at the polls a hi chief supervisor shall then appoint three sunervis ra for each polling precinct in the congressional district, two of different political faith and one additional neat dis git sc saj nj another republican Those supervisors shall have power to draft as man} drputv m irsh lisas thej shall deem necessary tisecuie a free expression at the ballot, bix Thev- are al o eiuiowercl to verify the re gistntoiis 11 xdo under state lavs and bj sta cers hj a house to-housc canv ass and anj mf rm it n thus procured shall be fui nisho 1 t) the chief sui ervisor for use in case a contest arises THF VVOBK OF THE SUPERVISORS III ot lei words tl o federal supervisors shall i bef re  n with the United States niir jl and district attorney tvv o othi r formalli can- -vass the returns and forward them to t i clcik of the national house of repre- sen tivcs II f i m such returns it shall appear that am ti 01 and different person is elected than the pt isc n certified hj the ofhcer or orhcers of tit. si ite then neither person shall be placed on the r 11s until the house shall determine 1 nil persm is elected lie f re omg sentence contains the key to the b II Ihe of the house, a part san othcir. shall receive the ex parto statements of irresponsible supervisors and deputy maishals TV ho iliavv the breath of their ofh' lal and polit- rc il 1 fe from the republican bosses and managers of greater weight than the svv oni certificates that the governor and secretary of state, who draw their power.from, and vv ho are responsible to the people for the faithful performance of their.duty These  mc rr vv Thf house 1 ill to ai end the T tor June IM i BS authorizing the rouutj of I t.eorgi i ti eon-.tri.it i bridge ler s.lie IK >a river at Dub 1m m that county Ihe time) and IIOUBO bill auth mzmjr Ihe eonstrui ti m of a rail road bridge ue ir Iho same were passed A INTRODUCTION Mr Settle Presented to the Caucus as a Can dldatc for Senatoi FnAMtlrom Kj Maj H addition the names mentioned last night as presented frr votes for Ln ted States senator in tie caucus, that of Hon UvaiiE Settle of Owen countj, w is put forvv ard The gentleman who nominated him provoked roars of 'aughtcr bj describing him as a "gentleman from end tc end and by saying that tho senator should ho a po< r man as Mr Settle was as he ow us iioth ng hut a wife and foul small chil dren Ihe vote on adjournment stood GO to 4fi The opposition is to it-present Mr   i >ur votes aicCn ary one and the rest were men who are not candidates Tho friends of Lindsay claim thirtj votes in to s caucus Vmoiig the rumors current to lay is one that the Louisville and Nishvi'le Kailroad company and Mason in I r-oril s company are using their intlu cnce in favor of Judgo I indsaj who is attoriej for I oth comi anies Ih s is the tir-t hint fiat suggests anj thing of a business nature in the con te-t Ihe plan suggested is to hi over to I ind say the friends ot Met rearj and Knott file first 1 allot in emeus to light resulted as follows C irlisle 34 Lindsay -5 Knott 2" Ml CrearylO Moore 12 Settles Reienilbilot Carlisle "2 Knott 21, Moore 13 I 2fi AlcCrearj 12 Settle G Thirl hal'ot Carlisle W Mc( 13 Imdsvv 2> Knot I'l Moi re Hi settle, 9 rou.th bxllot Cirhslo, 39, MeCroarj 12 Lniisav, 2b Knott, Ib, Moore 1-' Settle 7 tvan bettle, the sixth man in the race, is a popular member of tho lower house of t'le leg isl iturc coming from Owenton He is one of Hie leading orators of the stale The result of the oallotting tonight has no especial healing It shows a gain foi Carlisle and tho close, but hardly enough to bise anj calcula tion upon Caihsle is undoubtedly the stiongist uid his men are in a mood to ptioh the contest to a close CVM CUl'S AND SAUCEKS The House Easy on the arthenware Clause of the tariff Bill. Vav motion of Mr Mor rill of Kanaas the h mse insisted on its amend ment to the senate dependent pension bill and a conference was ordered flic house then went into committee of the (rroavenor of Ohio m thech nr) on the tariff bill nnln of Indi ma mov e 1 to re dueo the duty on common earthenware from twenti five to fifteen per cent ad valorem He argued that taking this clause in coanection with the customs admmistrativ e hill it would he found that the duty oa earthenware would be mcreaaed from to hftv per cent The debate was in dulgeil in by Messrs Mills, Bvnum and MclOu They should regulate production Raise only enough produce toireot the peoples wants, and the, ebj get fair pntes Dr Macune proceeded to explain the pro- cess proposed to regulate the issue of produce certificates He said that tho necessitv for ex cludni" imports of agricultural products was obvious if the quality of the ccrtihcati s was to bo preserve 1 The ccrtihcates would con- stitute the soundest and best currency inthe vv orld Pi c bably not one ha' f of the tut) 000 000 appropriation asked for to put the now machinery m action would be required, but the sum should not be absolutely fixed it the minimum as in time it would be necessary to extend the sj stem to includo all of the pro- ducts of not covered by patents In conclusion Dr M icune said that the Na tioi al All anee had not sent out a single Bruited petition, and that these petitions and. ly llow pouring in upon congress were' the "spi ntaiieous offerings of farmers of the United States who were com meed that they knew what the} wanted and wore going to hav o it Mr Flower said, in commenting upon tne ar gumont that the firmer would do well to iiian ige his domestic affairs without govern- ment interference COLOXEL LIMf-GSTOX TODAY Colonel Livingston was offered a half hoi r's hoar ng by the committee this morning but declined it, that ho could not deliver Ins argument 111 that tiiro Tho commit ee then agreed to hear him tomonow morning Colonel Livingston sajs ho knows certain con grossmen are laying for him, hut ho is prc pared to show that the farmer needs govern ment aid, and that he can prove the feasibility of the sub treasurj plan or somoth ng very near like it A TA.LK WITH BICN TERRELL Among the alliancemen present was Ben Terrell the lecturer I talked with him about the iciations between the all ance and pohti cal parties He said We do not trade with any partj We are more patriot, than partisans We are tired of sacriflc ng the Interest of tho peop'e for party ehavc got nothing to do with the democrat c lartj Wo are in favor of alliance meas- ures Where a state is democratic, we want to elect such democrats as will work 111 the interest of measures promulgated bj tho alliance in convention The repubt can momheis of this order will make tho saml effort to send men Lore who are friends of thi people rail er tnan fr'ends of a part} are independent, and we claim by that inde- pendence that we hold the ba'anco of power that we could not hold by starting a third party Therefore the crj of a third party is u liculous I would not be surprised in Al kansas m closelj contested districts, if some independents did not como to congress. However, such men w ill act strictly as independents here, with either party tl at supports tho measures or will of the people The alliance discourages nomi- nations in the alliance In fact it prohibits it, for tho reasons that if ue attempt_olhce- niakmg. wo would invite into ABBEVILLE, N C .May 14 Presbyterian general assembly will meet in this city at 11 a m tomorrow Itis made up of an equal number of ministers and ruling elders from seventy one presby- teries, cov ering the southern states Tho opemn.; sermon will be delivered by the retiring moderator, P.ev H G Hill, of North Carolina So far as known there will be no exciting questions before the body, and it is honed that much activ e, vigorous work "will be done in be- half of the great enterprises which the church has in hand 1 HE HISTORY OF THE BODT This body of Presbyterians dates its distinct organisation to When the war began, the old-school Presbyterian church was co extensive with the United States in territory Many hoped that tlib church would safely ride the Btorm of war, but -w hen the assembly of that j ear met m Philadelnhia in May, there was a large majority of northern men in the bodj There was much demand fora "deliv- and a resolution was passed setting forth in substance, that it was the duty of Presbyterians to uphold the United States government administered at Washington The southern members of the assembl} and a con- siderable number of loading northern bers protested against that action, But it passed, and as southern Presbyterians wore then living under tlie confederate govern ment, they wore of necessity shutout from the assembly ACTION OF THE SOUTHEEN PRESBYTERIANS. Ill December of that year in Augusta, Qa the Presbyterian church in the Confederate States was formed Thoopemngsermonwasproached by tlie Uev Dr B M Palmer, then and now the pastor ot the First Presbyterian church, of New Orleans A large number of able minis- ters and elders, now dead, -were members of that body After the war the name was changed to that of "The Presbyterian Church in the United the northern branch boms "The Pres- bvtenan Church m the United fatates of Amer- ica THE TALK OF ORGANIC UNION There has been talk of organic union be- tween the bodies, but there hav e been grav e difi cult es Tho northern church insists on CEDAR KEY'S KING AND HIS SHOT-GUM. A REGULAR REIGN OF TERROR. having negro presbyteries in the same assembly with the whites 1 hey have several such in rb-3 south nominally a part of their church but residing at a great dis taiico from the white piosbytor os The soutl o it chuich has a thcolog cal institute for the tiaimng of a colored ministry, at Tnsca- loosa, Ala which they support and they more colored ministers and churches on their roll, bnt all this is done that the> may prepare those peop e to start for themselves an African Proshyteiian church, and there are now two sepaiate African presby teries aided with money by the white church, but entnely separate m orgamration ihe southern church holus that far more good bo done for the African by helping to have his own church It holds 01 ly m a separate orgam can any consider ible number A Very Muddy Traclt and the Horses Make Slow Time. IXJFTSVILI.E, Ky May features of the opening day of the spring meeting of the Louis ville Jockey club were a great crowd somolivelj though not particularly heavy betting and mud And then the Kentucky Derby was run in the slowest time on record The nearest approach to it was in 1883, when Leamties galloned away from Drake Carter and the rest 1112 It rained all night continuing till 10 o clocn this morning Then the c'ouds began and there were occasional glimpses of the bun The tra-k was s'ush at the opening The canter scattered slop for several feet on ei her side As the racing progressed the mud dried a little, and became more sticky The initial event was the nve lurlong dash for two jear olds Grandpa won Libertj Bell second General Caldwell third Time 1 Second race one mile Liicle Bob won, Glock ner second Warpsak third Time 1 4d4 Then the Kilev won it because he was a long way the best horse started Iv ne of the other five could touch him on fiat mudily trick and it is doubtful if Bill Letcber, who alone proved to be in the same class could have pushed the great son of Lonrfellow even over a dry track 1 he starters were Rilej Bill Letcher Robespierre lihsad- Prince lonso nnd Out'ook Thej finished in the order named Time 2 45 Fourth race three quarters of a mile iirst heat. White ]Sose won, Loveland second, Eriena- less third Time 1 Second heat White Nose won Loveland second, Banner Bearer third Time 1 20 TO THE TR VCK At 2 o clock the heavens were and the derby track at Churchill Downs lay like a bright yellow ribbon glisteiiiag to the sunsh lie Tl r ngs of people had been crowding the street cars, and scores of carnages and vehicles ojjsvery descrip tton blocked the wav lor hours J When the called for the first race, the stand) area in front and the betting field freje ou derby day were hlled as never before Tw.enty thousand people were present There were more strangers than for maiij jears Cincinnati Mnd Lexington contingents came in thia morning looking much bedraggl, d by the rain but vveie dried olf and in hiprh leather at the track The of monev that changed hands v as verj ine pool room at the I ouisv ille hotel vv is p u-k< d this morning   p Montague aniUt. V. I.owle of Chatbinonga, p C Cookrof Connecticut, Little, All bania Clement A Evan" Atlanta, ha J L Johnson and George Red nond- Charleston S C Suicide of a Farmer. MONTGOMERY, Ala May 14 special to the Adv ertiser from Tallai'ega says E K Turner a farmer, committed suicide at his home list night while undei arrest He forged notes and a mortgage on a neighbor and was arrested at midnight last n .rht The sheriff consented to lot him remain at horre till morning and during the night Turner took ten grams of morphine From Cincinnati to Mobile BII.JII-.OHAM, Ala, Maj 14 T transfer of the Cincinnati Selma and Mobile rail- road to the East Tennessee, irgmia and Georgia has been completed. Improved train service and I1J.O nn-nnn-nrtail. Bup'erTisora can'oe'relie'dorrto do their mas- I Cincinnati and ter's bidding, and if it shall appear after the Mobile will be put on at once These trains wiU election next fall that the democrats cany the I run to Aton, Ala., flritte by, say, oy, say, tnirty majonijri mw wUliurnlah the ground-wotS L feam ramoaa. organizations Again a. candidate no-nmated alliance would be a class candidate, and therefore would be opposed_____ I.ONCaTKI.t.T BB THEKE He Will Assist at the Unveiling ol tee's Statue. RICHMOND, a May 14 is settled that General Tames Longtreot, one of the most billiant corps commanders m the Army of Nortl crn Virgin to be here at the unveiling of Lee's statue The fact that General Longstreet had parted company with a majority of his old associates in policy and joined the re- puohcan party, caused a feeling of doubt whether he would be here at the mrveilmg General Lonjstrcet, though, has written to Dr R t ullen, the medical doctor ot his ccrps, saving that he -would come on in company with the Washington Artillery, of Sew Orleans During stav here General Longtreet wall bo the guest of Dr Cullen Alluding to Gen Tal Longtreet's coming to take part in the me- morial to his old commander of the most prominent members of the Lee monu- ment board tonight, said "I in sure General Longstreet will receive a hearty welcome at the hands of the old sol- diers That day will be a grand reunion of old confederate soldiers, and I'm sure politics will not bo allowed to mar the joy of the occa- sion The thousands of veterans Tiho see General Longstreet will only remember him as one of the most brilliant corp commanders in Too putting- together ot the horse and rider was finished today, and workmen, will com- menco tomorrow to sSswa to the ton f leoplo be benefited Tins matter has placed an impassable gulf between the two bodies but some northern men were willing to come to the southern v icw AMJTHFT. DISTURBING QUESTION The northern body is now wrestling the question of revising the Westminster con fossnm ot faith, now nearlj 250 jears of age The southern church will stand aloof and see what the northern brethren may do on that hue The probability is that organic union is postponed to the indefinite fumie THE MEETING The last southern assembly met in Chatta It asked its presbjteries to send up formulated papers to this assembly on tho suhiect of 'The Tithe' and of voluntary societies The action of tiio prcshj teries indicates that the church regards the   Breckm "Htchcr and Robespierre were greeted with rounds of applause At the start in the betting Rjbesnierre was a hot favorite oil even terms, Kiley suddenly dropped tj two to one ami Let" her was at the figure They coi.fi ed leisurelj around to the hall mile post opi usite the btind is the chute had been close 1 and were off at the hr-t tap of the drum with I etcher m the lead Palisade second Outlook third the nthprs bum lied In the stretch Robespierre led n o third the third Robespierre ran out, making araeeto three mi irtprs hen Rilcv IIIB it began shipping for At once race and the Rileywentto the front a length coming to the "eeoiid ant! leaving third the BtngL.hiu 01 e Itiil 1'o'jespierre two thr -e In ttreteh leu-tire behind Outlook lost In ttreteh RneV was two lengths in front of Lctchcr and coming easilj anfi Itobesp.erre third Let. her ttien 'began to come, umjtr a heavy then beirai anil for a moment looked like his but ns aad Rilev responded bi b Baseball Yesterday At Philadelphia Athletic Brooklyn postponed, "'At Buifalo-BufTalo 1 I.aschits4 errors 2 Chi 4 errors 5 Battencs-t craoa and Macli, 5 base hits errors 3 ba.sc hits D er rors4 Battenes-Wcyhlng and Kenslovv Cun -W- Brookl j n 4 base hit? 0 hase hits errors 1 Battaes-Eusie and Eucklev Terry and Da y Vbrk 11 base hite 11 errors! Boston 4 base hits 0 errors 7 and Vaughn, Gumbert and 14 base hits 22 ruiiadelphla 8, base hits I errors 5 Getiein and Bennett Victor? Smithand Sehnver of Francis P. HU-S-TSVII.I-E, Ala., Mav 14 J-Francis P Ward, of this city, died this morning in Nash- ville, Tenn m his sixty ufth jear He died from a surgical operation CFDAR KEYS, Fla Mav deputy United Stales marshals arriv c 1 here late last night for tho purpose of arresting the major the W his city mar- (he charge if ossaultins Customs Collector linker on and interfering with him in the prosecutii i of gov eminent business The action of the governi icnt au- thorities is the result of a long series of out- rages perpetrated hj Cottrell in the most ol which he has been aided and abetted by Mar- shal Mitchell V genuine reign of terror has ex- isted here the full details of which will probably never be known until Cotfrell is safe behind the bars, for tho people do no d ire to spealc against him so long as he isat libertj United! States omcers succeeded 111 arresting Mitchell this morning but CottrcH was apprised of their coming andianoW in hnlmg Thej are on his trail, however, and hope to take him bo- fore morning The recent condition of affairs here seems- hardly possible in a land of hhertj but invest- igation proves the follow ing storj to be strictly true HE INTIMIDATES THK COLIECTOR Cottrell, besides ho'iling the olice of major, has been inspector of customs under the demo- cratic collector He had charges preferred against him at the treasury department im Washington, and was forced to reu rn his posi- tion as customs inspector This was after tho appointment of Collector Pinkertou by Presi- dent Harrison One day last v ee't CottreH mot Pinkcrton and asked the collector Lo open the custom- house for him, as he vvau el to get sorao things belonging to him vvhuli were stored m the building It was aftor ofhce hours and Pinkerton refused Cottre I cursed him out" and threatened his life The co1 eetor vvonC home, but ho was given ntKiee that if ho appeared on the stieets of Cedar Keys he would be sent into eternitv on Cot- trell s shotgun schedule His family naturally objected to having I'liikprton lone the house. Then Cottrell tried to pi i su xdo a negro to go inside and drag the eollectir out The negro refused, and was tlioreup n lieaton most un- mereifullj by Cottrell linscr. n was kept from going to the olnce by the f let that Cot- troll was gunmnff for him 011 tho streets, and. business of the Unite 1 Stati s was thus seri- ously interfered with Pinkerton was forced to leave his 1 ouse seeieth and to wade" through the waters of the lay up to his vvaist in oieler to av old meeting C ttrell 80VIH 01 C01TI L. s ACTS Fora J oar pist Cot nil hai held the city by the throat No m 1 M I ire, 1 to interfere with bun He goes a-m I i i fit'} lie baa comnel'cl aiictiu f 1 leleni iph opeiator; has threatened to th ill w neiivvl JSO has- ban Is had incurred ins i1 s] has kept men locked up in j ul f Jr da j s at a lime for no cause whatever has paraded fie with a loaded shot-gun thleatemng to kill anjbody -who came m 'us vv ly has kept men in their houses for wholo under a threat of killing them oa sight, has shot at the light-house keener in the street has cut another man with a knife and has actnallv f >rced his re election f major because it was worth a man s life to vote against him There is no politics in the affair faimply a reign of teiror under tba domination of a brute Those who know Cot- trell best say ho will never be tal en alive and it is rumored umig'it that ho will con e to town and attempt the resc 10 of M irsh il Mitchell THE FRE'VCHMAN H VD TO TK EI. After Eccelvlnff t-rly One Thousand LasliosJ on Ills Bark JACKSOV, Tenn Maj 14 ]-Thera was quite an excitemen1 here to day caused by the public whipping of a I rencbniaii named Manic by an indignant citizen Maine is a glass-blower Yesterday after- noon he persiaded the n ne jear-o'd daughter of "W O Cason to enter his shop and then at- tempted an outrage He v as frightened by litt r- Irene's screams and re eaced her Sho ran to her home and informed her father ot the occurrence and he h id Mante arrested After consultation with his trends, Mr. Cason decided that the proper thing to do was to publicly whip him with a horse vhip on tho public square Sn to-daj the man was brought aut of jail, and in tne pre ence of a large crowd, he was given 850 lashes on the bare liack, Mr. Coson handling the whip The Wood streamed from Maine's back, and when released he was bardy able to crawl leave town at once dorses the punishment An Awfnl Crime. MotTGOjinrs, Ala Mav M special to tho Advertiser from Hnntsville rajs' A r-omola crime has Leon discovered here- Ten ago, DeoGrifhn a neeress gave bir.li t illegitimate George GnSin and John ne- THE: ROTAI. visiT able to improve on them by offering ize for the most difficult book in th< Hc the college ot bishops had been in- structed lour years agoato prepare a series ot graded catechisms, but liad not done it He does not know why __ Bishop Keener explained why He said the bishops set to work to prepare a catechism, but when they got to a certain point they came to a stand-still and could proceed no further They discovered that they could not write a catechism, so they took one that had already been written by an Englishman, and put it in the course ol study part of the report offering a prize, however, was adopted. THE BEPOKT ON TEMEBBJUiCE The committee on temperance reported m of nnlermentied "wmp lor sacrament The Emperor and Empress Arrive at Koe- Enthusiastic Beception May and em- Ho vas made to Public sentiment en, Jwns wn Kro-s. killed both and sewed tl.- es up Shawl vhieh the} left in the w oda and the Th- negroes were arrested a I svettev ille, T in a. n fled. enn. BRL J [TIES Typhoid fever is epTlemi-- in Ca'ro Egypt. Alatama grandiose of OS2 lellows IB la baseba-l clal, disband vesterdaj for lack ol pa'ronsge The Natronal Convention of Charities and Cor- rection met m Baltimore vwterdav Tbe strike in Bob-ni.a is extending Soldiers arTpatrolling the streets of I-rajrue Tlie international pn-on cor-gress will Petersburg on -rtondav lime le-th -..dorrcrins :22 for four i Its yeiterdav S277 TOO, all accepted cents and 103H 'or four and a. was practicable, and approved the 'resotaSona intreKtaced last weefc by Haffnea orransing- all Dress arrived at Koemgsbnrg this morning When their majesties alighted from the BmsrrNGHAM, Ala May U A big sensation was caused in social and school circles today, by an order from the superinten- dent of the public schools to the pupils A tonness, a dance of all nations, traa recently given tor the benefit ol a church, and many school children took part. Arrangements were being made to repeat next week. Today Soperiatenaeat ot the public schools, announced that all pttpita t -who wno n took partm-tho Mnsless would K -Jioard: ot tbe _il! the BGafi   

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