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Atlanta Constitution Newspaper Archive: April 21, 1890 - Page 1

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   Atlanta Constitution, The (Newspaper) - April 21, 1890, Atlanta, Georgia                               THE ATLANTA CONSTITUTION. i VOL. XXI. ATLANTA, GA., MONDAY MGftfTING, APRIL 21, 180O. OFTHE SEA. CUT OFF FROM HIS FAMILY FOR YEARS ,11 rnllko Enoch Arrton He Horn. HU Story. S C., April SO B t'OKSTITt TH' iv cue of the uU-ut unearthed roauinces of t] Ardeu" case, unoileu residence, boeti to e kept up a ery liveU- correMHmdfiice v. .th Charleston, S C. Hi 81J 'l l B. Hoser, -...J to ll.e 1HK KMKK AT Till'. "He knocked at tl.c at m-avly 11 o'clock m.lif Fd.in.P. the there, jumped tin- CTTI- adventures read hkn tlo stl-.nd of 111.' I Ivde V ik. 1 THIS SETTUES IT. The New York World It Mr. S'irw YORK, April Tlse Wcrld said edi- torially this, Sunday, morning: Thcintrrrtew with tlrorcr Cleve- land, published in the World of Thnrxtiy ltt.-t, t excited ctmstderaMe comment In the pross throuphout the country. friend'? t" Mr. ClervLmd have generally regarded il natural ami justifiable outbreak of indignation after or seven 3 of gross jierson.U aluif-e by a maliunant eii- einy. Others who lire iwUtical'y oi-jwj'wiJ to thP have cpuki n it mwUgnitteU antt a man in his j-o1 rctnarkcil the vcheiurncc of tliecx- iun--. ami dotilitol of the After a we are that all Mr Cleifrlaml ptil H- fution of n i-hamctcr tontViiftlin tiie iourtoen lines tde remniks at- to him, ami th.it he   wt-U knnw th h (vrpign t" hn temper m >nf hi" i iibtimi ami all w.il readily rtfilit cx- p'anat.'ofi in VJPW of fact tlJ-tt ilipMifieil yet iiu cK-Ft manner In which he U nn all (K-i-.is n-i JiH t rt tnetit li-om the has won public ailmiration and i-> tlic {rttaniiiree th :t he is in vtjiaWe ot putting lii nisei f on ;i bin assailant. THK TIFK8 Bl'HhT, KILLED HIS FATHEB. THK AITFt'X, CXIJUK OF A. GARQLISA. PRICE FIVE CEN TS. HE SHOOTS A SLUG INTO HIS FATHER He Hail Chnstlswd Hlm-The Han Cliarer> Another Man Wllli (li CrJino, uut tne Boy RALEGH, N. C., April [Special. days %'d-vvr.rd N. Butler, a prominent citi- zen of Clinton, waa asyassina'eU there ivliile walking on a street in the M-.bnrba of the place, about midday. He lived jrome hours, aud umde a statement that John Simmons was the Simmons is a deserter Jrom the regular army, and has a bad cliaracto. Bay bcfoie joitcrday Governor Fowle offered a larpe re-.inrd for him. a fftartlnig revelation made rejyanl to tlic crime. A very Butler, a son f the nmrdered iran, aged fourteen, has con.- ussed that he is the asBassin, and tfiat he fired sins at his father. He he was ;rnelly beaten by his father, and this provoked lim to hill In in. boy fled as soon as ho iad made this awful elation, and a large larty is now him. 111NC IN TEMNKSSKB. April "Let any boy who ea cigarettes look me now and know- how I have suffered, and he will never put amgiictrin. hU These were almost words of Samuel Kimbnll, sixteen years of age, who died in a ward at St. John's Wtfkjf glance at him have been a tn milltons ot yovtiiful Hin body was of n deadly yellowish hue ann and trunk were emaciated, ,r'clii.c II.-. li ,f tho aud New .wexoi.d.il intcM-1 bctii stild to i li..l a t dtd not n'turn t-> Nt-w York. Hi- m tried to gi-t shipiM-i; b.u-k to Now ork from Hamburg. Fin.iKy, Iio the steamer Smith EiiiEl.xn.1, bv-ut.a for lV.-v.iui. IVru, with a careoofcoal Tho M. ntrost- er roarbe-l l.rr i.ort Slu> left Somh ShioUN on July 4, 1888 on the nearly neAthtr.m: tluj stumor hrc an 1 t'aptam Hill, Mate Roser, ami iho rn-w to tho IK ats an.l. Tilth pro-.ismn., ft i a month, Uiuled 011 the w VT< nv s vv During ll at tbnt Part of tlie coast uihabitL-d. The t.ill, naked Patagoinau lioxored around the camp, but made imattJtk MJto lloireis that some of nn.hn-bt wore fully st-. en f.-ot, They probably, Vad wine unpleasant vith tbt-y kept but from this tin-c the.r trnnli'c '-et in. A inctntU kept tne ships out ol tho beaten tracks and fieM-r iv "ail Thev bad their 'H hv  aiuiomiced his inten- tion of making some Tuesday in sup- port of his proposition for a constitutional mcmlment to for tho elect mi en a. tors by the iteople. After tlio world's fa r nd district nppioprKitimi bills are out of the ay. Hie o custom3 bill oiiie np, and this measure is likely to ho JH ed at Icrfi'h. The land grant forfeiture b'lll stands next on the caucus programme. A democratic caucus will held tomorrow 1 n course of action with to business of gcncial interest proposed by tho IN THK HOCSR. The week v. ill open in the house of repro- with the Oklahoma bill, which has been reported by tho conference committee and provoke some discussion. After it ia disposed of, tho remainder of tomorrow's ROS' sum will be consumed in a brief discussion and action upon tlio Indian and land bills offeree by committees for passacfe under a suspension of the rules. Tho present programme con templates the consideration of tire legislative judicial appropriation bill Tues day, and this may bo followed by either the bankruptcy hill or the bill to admit the territory of Xcw Mexico to statehood. Con si deration, of those dpreiids, however upon the action of the republican caucus to- morrow night. men are confident that tho result of the caucus will be the tioii of a silver bill which will be called up ir the house for action meaning Tuesday or "Wr-dnos-day but the element art) of the opinion that the bill wii not be taken up until the following week. The international copy right bill is a'so among- the subjects that may conic up for action this weak AT FOKTKKSS MONIIOE. Hangred by a Mob. 20. A flperial to the American from Fayetteville, Tenn., says: niuiitli the barn of J. C. KeJso.uear here, as burned and suspicion pointed to Stove fucoba, colt led, wljo had been discliarged by ilr. Kelso .sometime jirovionsly, the inceii- liaiy. lie was iujmediately arrested and to g'ive bond was lodged In jail. Tin-eats of b Jig were freely made, but it thought best to lot the law take its course. ..ast Tpesdav the bam of W. J. Banders nirned, wiiit-h again bi-onght attention to tho case of Jacob-, At tno o'clock, tlTis morning one hundred determined uieu rode into town and marched to the iail and demanded of sheriff that he deliver Jacobs to them. The sbciiff ieJFuse'1 to do so, -whetenpon they coui- neiiced to break dowu the door with sledge Findinjr the sheriff opened ,he door and, toyr-tber his deputy, at- to ft rcc his way through the and ;h e an alarni, but they were and taken jack and torted to unlock coll in ulifch lacobs was i-imiino'l. A rope WHS put around the prisoner's, neck and he was ttkeu nlimit ne mile from tow n and hanged to a tree, after Inch the mofi quietly dispf rsecl. The twwly was cut down tod.iy and buried. JOINKD HANDS THKOUOH BARS. A Woman in tiie Penitentiary to tiie MurUeror Her Ilunltaad. Vt., the state's prison Mrs. Cr< (ionlU was married to Sherman J. C'aswell, the murderer of her hus- band- i  expect lie will endeavor to drive them out of business, as he has done and does Too irf CoLvacstrs. Oa., April o'clock this afternoon Mr. Joseph Hanserd, one of the most popular men ot Colum- bus, was drowned in the river. Some time ugo Jiumber of youag gentlemen of the city formed a boat club aud built a new boathouse on the bank ol the river. between the upper dam and the Eagle and Phenix dam, and between which there Is a fine surface of water for rowing. There is about half a mile between the two dams, and there is seldom ever a pleasant afternoon when the river at this point is not dotted with row boats, the yaung gentlemen frequently taking the ladies out for a boat ride. This afternoon there was quite a nuuiher of boats on the river; Mr. Albert Mason and Mr. Joseph Hanserd, in one of these boats. By some means they approached too near the upper dam. After reachingacertaiu point the boat became unmanageable in the whirling current and was drawn to where the water of tbe falls broke off the bow of the boat and cap- sized it. Then here a great struggle for life. The exciting scene was witnessed by scores' of people who stood upon the river banks. Fortunately Mr. Hamilton Mason and another young man were in a boat which was near enough to render assistance. They succeeded in rescuing Albert Mason, but Joe Hanserd was drowned. 80011 an immense crowd gath- ered on tbe river bank and great excitement prevailed. Mr. Hanserd belonged to one of ttie best families of Columbia and waa very popular. He was a son of the late Joseph Hanserd, a prominent citizen, and a grandson of General Bethune. His mother is prostrated with grief. The body has not been recovered AFFRAY IN MONROE COUNTY. Mr. J. T. Dillard fehot Down by Franlt Wil- son. FORSVTH, Ga., April moruing about 8 o'clock, as Mr. J. T. Diltard and several other gentlemen were preparing to leave the river at Juliette, where they had been fishing Frank Wilson, a noted character in that section, come up to where they were and engaged in coniersation with them. 8on was drinking and made himself very dis- agreeable, and at last called MrTDillard liar, when Dillard struck Win. They were part- ed, aud Wilson left. Ifothing more was thought of it, and an hour later, as the crowd was coming home, Mr. Dillard was walking, while tlio rest of the party were riding in the wagon When opposite Wilson's house, Wilson called to his wife to bring him his gun and walked in the road in front of the wagon aud around on tbe side where Diliard waa. Seeing him com- ing, Dillard dodged behind tho wagon and Wilson fired, fracturing the bone of the left thigh. As Dillard fell, he remarked; "Frank, you have ruined me." Wil5on replied: and shot him again through the hand and thigh. Dr. Kudisill was called at oi.ce and decided to amputate, the limb, and this evening, assisted by Tur- ner Ponder, amputated it. Wilson was arrested and placed 111 jail. Mr. Dillard is a poor man. but honest and industrious; has nine children, all girts, wlii ounjj wlrite children in the cure and custody of a negro family near by. The story runs that some time since an old negro woman in the vicinity of the old burnt factory brought three white children out and put them under the care of a family ot her own color. Two of the children were about two years old and the third was about a month old. all point to the fact that the children were of good birth, although it is not known at all where they came from. A trunk containing fine clothes and several things suitable for wearing apparel was left with the negro family. Investigation is being made to un- ravel the mystery, and it may be cleared up. The old negro who brought the children to the negro family has mysteriously disappeared. SUICIDE OF A Simon Levy Horphiue at Sparta and SPARTA, Ga., April a salesman for Nussbaum Co., of Ma- con, committed suicide at Drummers' home here today by taking morphine. Efforts to relieve him were altogether unsuccessful. No cause is known Cor the act. He was about forty years old, and leaves a large family in Macon._____ PROHIBITION IN KLBKRT. THEY WANT Tflfe ROAD. in KanMwt About Midland There. ATHENS, April section of Georgia is greatly stirred up the prospects of bringing the Midland thfoogh here. Atheus is thoroughly in in the matter, aod will do as much as any city of her size could do to secure the road. Monrow is making an effort to secure the roa-1, aud people of High Shoals have taken active m the matter, which will doubtless bring tha road through that place. The High Manufacturing company do a very large busi- ness, and, having no very good railroad facilities, would be glad to see the road paw through that place. At the last meeting of the board of directors Lhe matter was discnssed ana the sum of B> was subscribed by them toward bringing the road through Hiifh Shoals. It proposed to raise another from the citi- zens of High Shoals, which will no doubt secure the road. This means a great deal for High Shoals, it will place it on a pood rail- road, and will devolope its manufacturing facilities to a very great extent. The water power around High Shoals is very fine, and run several more large factories. It also means much for Athens, and our citizens awaiting auxiomiy to see if the road will through this place. A NEGRO IN HARD E.17CK. by a Vny Stabbed by a Jcalouft HuBlnml. ALBANT, Ga., April queer criminal cases develop among the ne- groes of the oaky w oods. The other day a went to the house Mr. Morris, section boss 011 the Southwestern railroad extension, to procure some milk. was attacked by Mr. Morris's little dog, he ran iitto a neighboring swamp, where little animal made a stand, and continued barking at a safe and retired distance from his tormentor. The negro on the way back commenced nar- rating his adventure with the dog when was ordered out of his yard by Sol Bird, a, negro who resided in one room of the bouse iv front of which he was standing. He retired, and a few minutes thereafter heard a ternhie quarrel start up lie t ween Birdt and his now ly wedded bride. To hut astonish- ment he saw the dnsky bride leap out of open window of the house, closely followed by her titittband. Site the fence, bnt Bird was equally as and over he wont, too, and succeeded In catching her when they set to aud had a regular kilkenny tight. "When both had cried enough Bird then turn- ed big attention to the negro man whom lia had ordered out nl his house, and who had been a quiet spectator of the scnoua family jar, and commenced stabbing' him The lick cut his wrist, disabling hia right arm and compelling him to drop stick he held, hia only of defence. Having him at Itis mercy. Bird then plunged his knife into hia neck and left him. Bint has been arre-ited. It is thought that there must e been jealousy in the case, hence his called for attack upon the other negro. AS IMPORTANT CASK. A Uttle Kick on the at where. April ball game here to- day was given to Louisville by 9 to O fay Umpire Cnnnell nt the beginning of Louisville's halt of the third timing. The crowd numbered and so nlled the gronnda that the play was Haoto to be impeded. Under some condition, it was agreed between Captains Raymond ana McCarthy that ff a man knocked a ball against the teft Held lie take many baeea aa Joe liked. At the close of the St. half tiie third, the score stood 3 toO for St. Louis. Bran got first on bain, and Wolf batieU the ball ajrains-t the lett field seatt, and, upon the umpire's decision, Byan was given a run. St. Louis protested and refused play out the game, ana ConneH ffsre tbe game against them. St. Looia agreed to jtlay oat tbe Kamc as an exhibition, to tbe satisfaction of tbe crowd. Von der Abe will probably file a TTO- test against tbe decision. Tbe following ia the SCOTS: 13: St. Exmte, W. At Gotumbua, 4; At 9; Syracujwr.ft. At Newark, K. 6; Jwaey City, t Brvaflfaui Bxo JASKIKO, Aprfi Peraooto portfotio in tlie of eral Cofutant. who lieebmea ministor of tbe dmtioo, ana tele- A Negro Fined for Violating the Cases to be Tried. ELBKRTOK, April trial of the parties charged with violating the pro- hibition law, was commenced before Mayor Hawes Friday. Caleb Oliver, a negro against whom there were three charges, was put on trial first. The trial developed the fact that the town council had a man named Moseley employed as a detective and that he nad been employed months- The when tbe case was festing the most in Tbe evidence was concnlsive, and the major's judgment was that tbe defendant was guilty, ana that he should pay a fine of 823 or thirty days in the cuaingang. There are fifteen other caces to be heard, aU except two being against white men. They will all be tried in the next day or two. The Injunction of HnUb and J Mocon. MACON, April celebrated injunction case of M. Jl. Rogers, W. A. Hubb et al. against the mayor and city of Macon to en join them from issuing S200.00O of sewerage, parking and paving bonds, came on for hearing today before Judge Miller In chauihera. Plaintiffs hold that the of the boudf would be iJleg'al at a special election in which there registration, in which not a vote of the preceding general ctty Section was cast. The lawrwrs for plaintiff are K. K. Hill Harris, Gustin, Gaerry Hall and F. J. M, Daly. defendant are Clifford, Bacon Huthcrford, Dessau Jette, K, W, Both have art able array of counsel. On the opening of case this morning, plaintiff asked that certain papers bearing on the last general city elec- t'.ou, in 188H, be produced in court, in accord- ance with au order of Judge Mil- ler. Defendant c-aimed that as the tally sheets iiisaid e'ecu on bad not been pre- it was impossible to produce them. The judge then ordered that tho returns of the election of be shown. iJofendant did not have the papers in court, and adjournment was had until o'clock this afternoon for the returns to be forthcoming, or cause shown why they were not. This afterm on the re- turns were presented, showing votes were cast. Defendant held that two-thirds of this vote should not be taken as for the bond election. Affidavits, etc., were submit- ted. Argument will be made next Friday if the bUMiiess at the oourt will allow if not, then on next Wednesday week. ColoKel WhftfleltTg Popularity. MILL.KDOBVILLB, Ga., April [Special.) A big petition lias been sent to Colonel R. Whittield by many of the citizens here, urging him to allow his name to be used in connec- tion with the next legislate race. Colonel Wbitfield'u reply is a manly article, in which he says he will not enter a scramble for any office. If the people want him to serve and will elect him without contention orstriffc. he will neglect his private affairs for their in- terests. Colonel Wliitfield in the choice of aa overwhelming majority of the people, an "Oar Bob" will be a member of th6 next legis- lature. __________ An Old Negro EATOKTON, Ga., April Simon Reid, an old negro living cm the planta- tion of Mr. Richard Terrell, In this county, dropped dead on last Monday. He appeared to be in perfect health up to the time of hia death, and had just come from the tie Id where be haft been at work. He was in the act of reaching on a shelf in bis house for something, when uir dropped dead. There on the learnt. MACOW, Ga., Apnl is ported that Mr. Miller Gordon, of the whole- sale grocery firm of Smith Gordon, has sold bis plantation in Florida, tor SltiO.GOO on ac- count of some valuable phosphate deposits been found on his land. T" ton. KATOWTOK, Ga., April last Saturday George Harris, a negro working on the-new bridge, now in course of construc- tion by tbe Middle Georgia and Atlantic rail- road, was hurt by a piece of timber falling on him, breaking his ankle and other- wise injuring him. He waa carried to bis Home at Meri wether station Monday morning, and died there yesterday. Both Got A war. SATOKRSVILLK, Ga., April Jim and Tom Sheely, two negro Jads, in a fight to-day at Apricot u, and exchaupe'l several pistol The latter -was hit in hand; tbe former escaped nchurt. parties elnded arrest. Gored by a 1 Cuif-row, Ga., April J. A. Pitts, who lives at the "Old aboot eight from place, bad a gored by a f bull day last week. It is tuoaght the will recover. BTFFIS, An Arrefftia WATCBOSS, Ga., April Sheriff Henderson arrested today John Kof- t loud, colored, en the cfaaige of aiaanlt with in- erty'adjoimng'theiroil milt site. Tins is a valuable piece of property, and if tbe rumor is true, which could be ascertained tonight, will ftive the aUiancetnen ample ground on which to erect their new buildings. KCFAUI.A, Ala., April J. Zj. Baker, a prominent young physician, was thrown from hia boggy and aerioaslj in- jured. bona became frightened and ran, throwing bisn out. Hia bacz ia atipposed to bare been broken. death ianpected at any-aionMnt. A Bndcairf am Oil Aatil GnxBTille will hare a bank gold to a 3Cew Jenejr Tfum. THOILUVII.I.K, Ga., April [Special.] A large plantation, situated five Crom town, belonging to the late for. 8. A. Jones, was sold Friday to TAs. C. H. Cliapin of New Jersey. Tbe price {Mid Case Win Vf. nLLK. Ga., April of iBjonetiaa against the Macon BirminKham railroad will come np Judge S W. Harris on asth of April. Vf. llw betoc; il. Ga., April rning Om m. hofeCal M to grofftntt Sf SPAPERf   

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