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Atlanta Constitution: Tuesday, April 15, 1890 - Page 1

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   Atlanta Constitution, The (Newspaper) - April 15, 1890, Atlanta, Georgia                               THE ATLANTA CONSTITUTION. VOL. XXL ATLANTA, GA., TUESDAY MORNING-, APRIL 15, PAGES. PRICE FIVE CENT'S, THE ANSWER GIVEN. rat isr AGITATING MEMBERS OF CONGRESS uf Alabama. Declines to Assent to Them and Ueasouft, lit Full. tiai qm To tl m  to how tin sin1! answer tnem V e already received tho questions To tho howei er, they e not come (_ d i of AI ibiraa, with his tisuil i xl the wiy for the mere -.mtn He has answered tht, i ml ho his not to h s just as thev art 1 troft.'iurv scl tine for the establish i irihnusu in each counts in tht titLs in hiLh tho farmer mij r ib t i ro luc s and borrow cight> flit, t fr >m the t u k> lo be for the i lit mltrtxt ho Id and so htmsolC in uni Urn s 1 i t m nlioii in-ioliitiom 'ie s 1 it s f tlu in t r he oul 1 ms-v r In roini lib "T hue rfid them oiiie ho is ind s< ue he  t FL I Tl H TRIM SI KY PI VN DIM I It t tit. plan in vi-s-i tw a bilK t. h t t tTi t luttfl in   to tho sub treasury aud othei in ti 1 r re-elettwii ro is what he s I L h b a i r lUes fot i loan of 1 v p rnmciU f the niteil states oa h rt i i ti uid without di tusin the details of 1 i r I ti U ou in all taml >r th it I can t con si u nt u lv tote for either of said tlit, ru n that tin vurmnent >r the I nlted. states 1 i tower untkr the tonstitutio: mum under aiij art ii U f the d nstitiitiuli I c 1 lint fliall power an I I L t vs. (lutes, mil oits ami exports to tht U1 t Lt _ r 1 u money fct H r r g-u it  grants 1 ind not one of which L.T, en bv infer f ti itnme 1 construction, authori7e the 7 itt. J to loiJi nionej I hai e tiken in >ath to supi ort the constitution, and cann >t supl ort those measures without olatn it If cither of the I ass, I tell yon is impossible, it is presumed that tho pros, nit ut wnuld it and if he did not the su preine court iroithl be boim'l to detJare )t 1111 tonsiltutional and T think I could show other ohiertums to the scheme In the mittcr of the mu tipJit ition of fe teral oihres ind tljt> ibihty f it the issiunce of un liunite 1 greonbicks until thej would bt, north lit le more than c uft dor tie money during the. -n ar But it u, nniuirc-tsarj f r mo to disc these jii i TH tv I im n nfr ntc 1 1 tl ronstiln ti i i R-.II in it tl t tij thresh >ld ind L n n t any f uthcr 1 n ei r niio vn i iltu B ortJiy >f t 11 in i h d I n t f r in bsi met. of tin L n-tit iti n is oar fat hois mile it If dt iii K rii v does not m' an this it is JIG better than ie( nblu inisin Tho eviis cause tin i n ifnt, i f the farm in lustry of t tint TV atiiiu t t met an immc by un> sm. u n e 1.11 iv i tl at i lopostd hj the s ib ti is u d bills these ils ai that d( result from tlio btirdt ns of i! in us cr tixatiin the t( inbin iti n of in IK i olies and trusts anil p irtiil 01 class leg n -IHl KNK HTS Ut I The linn u boln i en tin inners Alliance an I tlu I njo i I ab m the treasury arc til en ai cK frim him in taex s IhcbO labor o iti us ue all the time besieging con g't -7 fir in ie ly ind higher v I ast nlDr tin Ku ghts of I abor 1 -such oil in (incline cr c jngress and cxeietse I it tint tin m ido the burpiu of j rmtmg and 1112; f >r the eminent set aside and abindon tl o iue d A lot of labor machines to make room for t'no hundred more laborers to do tho work by hand at per da> each That IH taken from you in part by taxa tion There are numerous instances, but I Jte these merely forillostration A. BLOW AT THK IfARMPRS V large poicentage of the profits which the southern f inner makes on cotton is what he can for seed Refancd cotton seed oil is clean pure ind wholesome, and as now largely usod m compounding with lard, which makes a cheaper ind more wholesome article than the pure hog lard A bill is ponding In the house and orablv reported, to im- pose i tax although the government does not need tho enue, on compound lard to dis- criminate igmist it in or of hog lard Tins is to tho full extent tho tax burden on the cotton producer, jastin the aino waj that a tax on cotton ties is a burden et tho Knights of La- bor havo m their grand council, recommended passage of this bill I am in fai, ir of requiting the manufactnrersof articles tntorsta e commerce to urind their goods Showing ju. twhauthay are, bot I will never ?ote to in of one industry another The principle 13 The wholo financial problem applicable alike to nations bUtes ind individuals, consist in proper uuderstanding of interest anc nomy of expenditure If a man's annrta exi eoilitures in the aggregate are less than hi; immne aud if interest runs at all, let it run t him and not from him, and he is prosperous omt happy But let his expenditures excee, his mcouue to any extent, and interest run a? mist him, er low the rate, and he is 01 the high road to inaoh ency and misery Don' borrow a dollar, even at one per cent, if it cai bfc avoided, should be the motto of every farmer The United State owes fourteen hundred nulhou u doll am, borrowed daring the war, on whicl Uieyaro paying milliooa of each 3 for interest The rate paid on the main lirtlk of it is 4 per cent So, It it were constitutionaltoloaniuorc3.it could not be done without loss for less than the United States pays, w ItJi an addition for printing, tho salary of officials, additional public build- ings, etc so that such loans as the pending bills cotitemplate cou'd not be made for less than 6 per cent soino of ot-r farmers have ao long; indulged m the hod prac- tice of borrowing that thev are now to hive recourse to It to some extent If such are oppressed bv the exactions of usury by private lenders, tho proper renodj for this is in the hinds of >oui own legis iture can ehinge the law so is to make the taker of usury forfeit love the entire debt Sueh OULC. m tht- state if !New and it sustained b> the >urts Af, 11NST N I KS f do not brln e im more mtioml hink ch to be giautcd or those in tx istaiwe eitcudul, ch of cmtso would g-tdua lj rotue that vsteni Ihe b uikh ut las f congress, allow e 1 to take no unit terest foi the use of rnonev than the lie st UG in n hit Ii they arc lorited makos in ill lit i in they firm .ere. tfiaii tn o million moiith The extinction of thclunlvs is I hivt s cd would make the 'volume f t irculationlcss uu ts a substitute is pio ded Ithii k thepre ont 'lun u t f tun ency, which id somUl mg le s bin liftein hundrc 1 imllK n dilUrs to ie in rt -ui 1 n m moil jkntiful riitj b isineis of the country n ijuiies it lo lit t tm end 1 am in ir of tho free com oj siUcr and will ote for it this session i i ilso in or of the la unw-e, of i n r bullion eortil'r ites on both jrolrt and deposits, with the treasurer Such cir il t ites ma> be mide to take the place of it o al bank and, will afford the best urovt j in tl e wor'd I im 111 r of ie the f aimer on the Anurew JacKnoii >lan Mop tiicing their substiuce by unnec itiuit and thut which Hun iccessai> for tlie ernmmt 111 the pockets ft tlu, farmers 1 im up posed to snbsid es and aids from tho re isurj to corporatu in to which the firmers e to contribute in taxition The distressed armors scok partial relief hj prijing o d atnbute money more liberally and 111 r pensions 1 he annu il expenditure 'nmi the m pawnent, of pensions foi .ho present >en 13 er one hundred millions of dollars Tho people of the late seceding southern itcs piv ab mt one third of all that reac lies tlio treas n 1 hcj, therefore i tubute jcai to this pen >n fund about (thirty three millions Not exceeding one million of this sum is dis tubuted for pensions in thoae states There [ore there n an annual drainage of million dollars from the people of these states which is distributed among tho people f the nt i thorn and western states Southern representamea in congress even if united .inst tins iue erleis to prevent it Vn f >rtumtclj of our distinguished senators and representatives vote for and enconrage these ixnsioji apj ropriiUons I noter have ______ E W B AN1> HAII.. Severe Stonns IlUnom and Kain Fell lit Torrents GTOv, III April 14 most un usual fall of rain raised tho btreamh ut of Heir cm vmg minj bridges ii rnnntry ronds lit this fitv four inches of rai i fell in less than in houi There wai a re nurkible fall of hail stone11 as large as hid ory in 1 w limits TJje storm in south Dloomiug' t( n see ns to h u o be n en u ore sc> ere tl 111 liere dlass in greonhouses in the city neu t t Toiishe by the hail At Minier seventeen i'os west tic t fly iss 111 town -n as broken The betw ten Minier and here i is deluged and considerable ilone to tho Chicago and Alton track Piles uf ties floated iw ami ininy lodged on the nils wheit and garden t re crushed flat One of tho most severe wind storms, p lined bj inin and hill visited Covington Ind jesterliy ifternoon Mail stoneb as luge  need it Then the market became quiet. Receipt? of 7 000 bales the port checked the buying The fine planting weather was another element of wcakneas Cater (after July) ware depressed by-----.-------- taxing future dealings Still the close was about steady Cotton on spot wa> quiet VSTlgS. The nver Miai. has been atation- ary for tin tart twenty-four Butte, Montana, went dnpocratic yesterday Bntte is in SilVer Bow county Xbe national oil tnut has ceased to ex v nationalist, member otBWlla- ment for East Galway, is dead Tbe schedules of Jphn F Plnmner A Co t dry York, were fifed Tbe Ha billtles are WTO, aavets, The hMebaU club defeated tbe Richmonds in a game yesterday by a score of 30 tp 0. The game was played in, VTaduiigton Five thousand dockmea at Berkehbemd, Eng land, are nut on ttrlka Iq cotOKqwocti ot de- mand for increased The difference betwen the Central Labor union, of York, and-ttae jron worjcspeople waft adjusted Sunday, and tfec men returned to work The Gilbert) atarcli works, at Ia.t were burned yesterday Loss Three em ployes were burned to death The striking carpenters of Chicago threaten that if tbe master carpenters persist in pottmc UD ion nun at strike of bricklayers and masons will be ordered- Tenterdmj to Erickwm's propbecf.ui which San JTraneiBco would be stroyed, wad tbe efaaks wete on ite hills ootslda of the city, awaiting the news which H1S DEATH ANNOUNCEDTO CONGRESS Bait t fay WASHIKGTOK, Apnl a steady stream of. camera at the Randal] residence to- day to express their oiympatny with the oe- family A large number of telegrams of condoJeooe wore received from well knotm pecttoua, including Governor Hill, ex-Secretary Whitney S Hewitt, Governor bell, of Ohio Mrs George W Fall in behalf of her aunt, Mrs James K .Polk, Calvin S Bnce, Senator McPherson, of New Jersey, Cotoiwl D S I-amoiit Mr Smith M Weed, Mr B K Jamison T J Campbell, of Now ork President Roberts, of Uid Pennsylvania railroad Howell, editor of THK AT- L CONSTITUTION Hon George L E Converse, of Ohio Governor Beaver, of Penn- sylvania, ox Sertator WalJacc, of Pennsylva- nia, and Hon Thomas Ryan, United States minister to Mexico VCJNKK4.L ARRAKQffUKKTS Mr Randall's body is still in the room in whicu he died The casket in which it will finally repose is of plain cedar, with black eloth and copper lined The only inscription name, aud date of birth and death of deceased "The remains will be taken from the house at 8 o clock Thursday morning to the church, where thej can be viewed until 9 90, when services will begin At Laurel Hall cemetery the casket will be opened aud an opportunitj the friends of the dead man to view the remains THE PALL-BKAIiEBa Honorary pall bearers been selected They are George W Childs A J Drexel Colonel Alex K McClure, and William M Muller of Philadelphia ex Governor Andrew Curtis, of Pennsylvania Charles A Qana, of New York Senator A P Gorman, of Mary- land ex Congressman William H Sowden of Pennsylvania, Representative James H Blomit, of Georgia Senator John 3 Barton, of Virginia and Dallas Sanders, of Pemisvl- The active pall-bearers will be capitol policemen George B Mcade post Grand Army Repub- lic, of Getmantown has requested that Grand Army be held at the cemetery, after the regular ceremonies, but a reply was sent stating that they will have to be omitted for of sufficient time MOURNING FOR RANDALL. Axuiouncemeot of His In the Senate and WASHINGTON, Apnl 14 Rer J G Butler, in his opening prayer in tlie senate, the following reference to Mr, Randall's, death TAeblese Thee for the lonjj and useful life of Thv servant, now departed whose departnre we inauTD We bless Thee for his faitb in the r ortt Jeaua Christ. for his patient Buffering, and tliat his end has been peace Vfe commend to Thee those who now gather in the dark shadow of the home circle Them judge of the widow and father of the fatherless, comfort tiwm la their sorrow Lead them, keep them, and give unto them Thy peace Mr. Cameron rose, and itt treutaiotta ith emotion, Mr President the announcement just made of the of Mr Ran pKxmce sincere sorrow in tlie heart of mem tier of this senate of pjrty 1 offer the following resolutions ed That the senate lias heard with deep crft -mtl profound sorrow the announcement of tbe Uoatli of Hon Samuel J llandall, represents c from the state of PennsyU ania IteaoHcd That tlie senate concurs m the resolu tion of the house of representatives for the ap ixjintinent of a committee to attend the fnnentl of the and that a committee of five on part of the senate be appointed by the vice presideut The resolutions were agreed to, aud Messrs Quay Allison, Dawes, Voorhees and Eustis ere appointed a committee on part of the senate Tlie senate provided for a committee to at- tund Mr, Randall s funeral and adjourned in Mourning1. air of sadness pervaded the house cham- ber when the Speaker's gavel called the body to order Draped in black and ornamented with a handsome floral design the seat so long occupied by Mr Randall, recalled to members the fact that tbeir old colleague had passed forever A crayon portrait of tbe ex- speaker hung in the lobby, also tastefully, draped with emblems of mourning In his prater the chaplain said bless thec Almight> Gort tint in the gloom Inch eushromls m there is tbe clear uhimngof Th> love aim that in the awful stillness abmit the mouth of the openmc tomb, a voice clothed with almip-Iity power speaks f am the resurrection ami the lite Itowmjr with submission to Thy will we surrender-to-Tlrv fatherhooci our beloved friend and brother His name is Inscribed among the heroes patriots and statesmen of the countrv on the imperishable tablet of history and bis memory Tlie mem on of hia deeds and character is enshrined in the hearts of his tountrvmen, for wlioae honor welfare he so Jong and faltlifullj fuuplit O Thou who didst Bhed the precious drop of pity at Beth anvgrate wilt Thou not come to the widow whose TI added life Iiaft been one Jong-, joyout act of sen dcvetion, ami the children bereaved by this irreparable loss Bring home to tliem and to us the comfort and consolation that DO noble life is really extiugnitthed by death, but passing hs Uinil a veil, ana enters upon higher and grander Viemg in the glorious light of Tby presence Bring them and JIB to that higher life, we pray, through Jeans Christ- Amen Di CHARLESTON. Re lectures the Hofnenofc Society CHARtESToir, S C Apnl 14 The Bayard consisting of ex-Secretary T F Bayard. Mrs Bayard and Mrs. Clymer, the mother of Mrs. Bayard, bad a royal recep- tion here today In the forenoon they were taken to Fort -Sam tor hi charge the mayor and the committee of the Huguenot society. At I p in they attended the meeting of the iwciety, and later held a reception at the hotel, where hundreds of the first fam- ilies called and were introduced to them Tonight Mr Bayard delivered an address at the Academy of Music, to an attdi- ence of over of the ot the city He spoke for upwards of an hoar and a half In his address he a Haded to the race problem in the south, and the opinion that the question would sortie itself wttneot Interfer- ence on the part of the geneial goremment, which he After the addzesa the distinguishea Tisiton were entertamed at a reception at the residence of Colonel H 1 on the battery The ipll leave for the north tomorrow L AWRKHCE BARRETT. It Is flM Appeared Bfa tlM CIKCIKNATK, O Apnl 14 Times-Star today says It u net Improbable that Law- rence Barrett will never again wtpeag on stage Edwin Booth has received two from Ku old fnend very recently, daring his {n this city last weekt dearly In- dicating that DO work most arranged for tbeaext season at least, ia way of tbe of these two stars, Tbe tion in Boston rmowd buys tv______ growth from Mr Banstfa Wt BOW comes the miwetcoroe news growth hms developed in other Body, and while tnmots ho wemer, al itherportiosu SBBfftt rtacsv He Ii the POI.ICKS1AN MASBCT BCBUED, in a IHuaccroiu Condi- Ition. BRUNSWICK, Ga Apn! 14 licomait B-1. Massey, wbo was killed in Sat- urday's tragedy was today at 10 o'clock From hall Her E Z F Goldea de- a fnneral sermon The choir, osmposeit of Mrs Allen, organist, Mrs. Golden atnd Mrs Oarber. sopranos, Mr R L Bran liam aud Mr Frank Bander, rendered beauti- ful music -well salted to tbe occasion Ptolioe- ittfta headqttajfters were toiav decorated with stgas ol juoornmg and a cozmmttee Ipiaa the concil and tbe police commissioners was appointed to form resolutions on Police Msasey's death The police ferce will also draw up la called session WMS afternoon tbe councJ appropriated frJ.OOO to Hie dead officers widow Tha eouacil, board of police commissioners city offic als and the entire police force attended the fu ueral in a body an escort of honor Baldwin.fhe joung man who did the killing, still in a dangerous condition Tlie femoral artery ffJayed and Jiablo to break at any tune Judge William D Kuldoo of bert, and C Jurtland Synimcs of Brunswick will defend him As stated the defense will be temporary insanity Marshal Houston 13 much better His phy cian announces that he will soon er THK TAILORS AGAIN. Sillier St Hughes a ft on-Union bJiop -Last There is another feature of the Tailors' union strike Last night the union a meeting, and declared that Miller Hughes was no a union shop This all grew out of a resolution passed sometime ago bj the union requiring all work, to bo done in tho shop, aud none seat out to be done at home There is a tailor uamod McKew who seems to be a cry fair tailor, hut is> not popular with the union He left Atlanta last year and went to Domer Froin thence lie went to and re- cently ho retumed to the city and secured work with Miller Hughes But he did his work at home This-was con- sidered a violation of the of the union, and a man naa wait on McKew ami to inform him that he would ho required to work in the shop McKew went to his employers and informed them of thn The result was that Miller Hughes quietly informed the union men that such of them as were dissatisfied with ther ac tion in employiiier McKew mipht e Seven of them left and when the met last night tiiey declared Miller Hughes a non-union shop, m consequence This is the state of affairs, as gathered from President and other members of the union, who were seen after tlie meeting last night THE SOt'THKRN The finance Committee Buay at Work for May Week. The Atlanta branch of the Southern elcr's will bring a great crow d to Atlanta during the big Hay nook convention The finance committee Tvent to work with a vim yesterday, and a large amount of money was subscribed by leading merchants It was a grand da> work, and will be followed by other dajs of equally successful soliciting The committee is determined to raise (he monej, and has fgone about ft witli uliuaual energy In time for May week the association ex pects to have its club rooms in shape, the tmest in the southern states association la itt thorough working order now, and are nulling all altoKether In the matter of railway and hotel livery stable rates, and other demand- committees hate been sncctasfnTaud are still at work Their success ine'tns the saving of Atlanta merchant-, andtdo proapentj of tlie association should be i matter of personal con cern to erv business man in the are working enthusiastically and with the general uration on the part of the merchants they vtijl make May Week a monument to the business enterprise of At laata Bat It la a, fcmall and IJttlo There was i b g b'aze out on Georgii e- nue at 1 20 this morning But it tun cd out to be a small fire It n as a woodhoiise in the rear of Mr Haggerty's dwelling, about two from Pryor street, and sitting- on i lull it looked formidable The alarm r as sent in from box 38, and the departure it turned out There was only ouc plug available, and it took a lot of hose to reach the fire and the duelling The small house was consumed with UH ton tenta, hut tfae loss was not great, probably a few hundred doJJaK The department got in its work juit in time to save the residence, which was just ready to ignite Tbe Centennial Hall Fair There waa a large attendance at the fair at On tennlal hall last night At booth No 1, presided orerbrStrs Gilbert and Mrs JDeihl several new articles have been added. A handsome chair by Mr A O Rhodes, a Mirer cake basket by Mrs R bchmidt five dollars from Mrs Kate ox, Mr Joe (..itens Ir a haiiUsome flannel ehirt from Mr Muse Saturday njght the Putnam trotipe came out in force H.DU viaited the fair The charming little actress won a 1 hearts liy ber sweet ana loving ways Her presence drew a large crowd to to the fair The ballot at Ao 1 between Master Johnnie Peel. Jiinmle Lynch and Willie Klsworth, beginning to be verj exciting The many friends oieach little gentleman are ra'Ij-ing to tbeur support The charming little actress, Katie gave moot in aid of the cause for-which the fairU held The J9ar BCeetlnc. There will be a meeting in Atlanta today of the executive committee of the State Bar association to arrange for the anual meeting of the associa tion to be held next month in Augnvta A special feature of that meeting wfU, be an addreaa by Hon JohnG Caritste _ SOCIETY NEWS. Mr and Mrs Henry JacVson, of Nashville, are visiting Mrs Jackson's parents. Colonel and Mrs R.r Maddox Judge and Mra, Hawaii tfleaVKve tonfgfat New York, where they wtU make their A baany welcome has been Mrs CUeanhj In Atlanta and Athens, and she has won very many admlrvn f roan the boat of and admirers of her husband. elab o at the KimbaU Utt atght. Besides the hone of the club there were a great number of visitors whose presence added xnatly to the plejtftores of the occasion, Tonight, at tbe of Mr A. H _ toy tbs yow IsAes of Onter the Red doss. The entertainment is for a chaittaMe purpose and loYentaf music wilt surety be repaid for gulag, lowing artists Measn Burbonk, Fsavce, Xortben, Hafcr, aftes Ixwiae Fratber, Un Bearie Ked- dhtgKine. rrofeacorCarfiale, Mrs. KdMcDonald, Mr Bam otters wbo are ex- pected te George T Shearer vare onited te awriace last eminent the First church, tbe Ur Morrison ing. The cgramoay was, obaennd by a ber of friends of contracting qatte Imprwsive. After the Mrs. Shearer 4rtv0 depot accompanied by fat a trip to IfcJtimore, and Xew York: The bride to of A.sbiiate% _ _ mast popttiar and yonng ladi. has nany friends wbowbti her lone and haonr life Than tbe croom there to ao pomdar im Atlanta. ami is work, tMr PMSMSCS tto reanaet and mvfrom one NEW EVIDENCE ITMJtCH C 4.X.L8 FOJt KOTfOJT TORE-OPEN THE M'CREGOR TRIAt- One of TT to TeU A Ga April 14 The McGregor-Cody case baa been one of ana there seems no end to them Ia addition to 'those already published dunng last week's tnal, today bungs forward two more F.rat, in forcing the aijimrumewt of Hancock superior court until the fourLh. Monday m May breaking up the sesaiou of that court alter lawyers, jurors witnesses and aH parties iiitcrested were assemblod and tonight m the uuprccexlented proportion of tbe defendants counsel to tjkt. the case> from the jur> after thoj been de- liberating on it fortno uid after leading counsel on the other wilt, e gone to their homos, and place before the jurj uewjy evidence of importance totha prisoner HANCOtK COCTRT ADJOIKNKD "When Judge Lumpkiu arrived this morning and questioned the jury tlie> reported that had been reached Ilo then informed them that he should for at 2 clock and adjouni Hancock superior court. which, but for this> case would opeyedl this morning He would then return and this jurj all the time it required to reach a When tbo jur> ret. red ta their loom. Judge L.umpkin he considered it specially important to Warren t omit} that this tedious and e tnal should not ba> throw u away bj discharging the jury too soon. He didii t believe it poitaible to get another in the ease ia Warrcu though, of course, the effort would to bo made if a mistrial was had. The result would be that after sumnioman: cry juror m tbe count) no jurj wuuld be se- cured aud the case Mould have to be removed U) another count j arren county would to pay for the tnal in the other count an J it would something like in e tlmusaud dol- It important to this county, therefore, that a erdict should be reached if possible and he meant to gue the jur> amplest opportunity to agree Counsel on both bides agreed m this Mew, and requested that the jurj he held iiigly Judge Pumpkin went to Sparta and ad- journed that court tULs afternoon aud n 1 ULIISJ tonight TUB SUMORS OK THK DAT Rumor baa uot been id.t, daitie lias ic that onlj one man on the jury IM holding out against a >erthct for acquita] Uiat the other ele% on have been reatly to nuke erdict at any time, but be nenuiteutJjf guilty on every ballot in tho jury room. Whether or not thin is true of course no outside of the jury room can posit rely affirm, but that is the rumor and the belief in thr town today Tonight tho jurv aiked to hear the charge again and when they had taken thmr scats, and the judge was about to begin the defense exploded a real iito sensation in court. Mr Whltehead said to tlie court that if tfiey should wait until the jur> had finished its deliberations the defence would be too lato to secure a hear but at this stage of the proceedings tbcj had a motion to make. which was of importance to their cheat, Tlie solicitor objected to any new matter being discuss- d m the presence of the jury, and tbe court ordered them to the jury room. Mr Whitehead then disclosed tbe fact Jick Swain who had roint to tbo aid of state with material aud untypectod as- sistance has not told all be knew that would benefit McGregor w tule he was on tlie staatf. lie had occupied a embarraHsing positiom as McGregor's friend and Cody srelative had teati hod most hesitatingly unwillingly. Ha badouly told what he was directly asked about, aud had volunteered nothing. Since the jury Itad remained out so and the question of McGregor a acquittal seemed to be increasing in doubt, ho bad re- pented of the fact that he nad not told all he) kjiew, as much he hated to do so In talk- ing this afternoon, he had asked if there any possibility of being convicted 'There may be, was replied "Tb-uwillnexer do said he, must not be conMCted I know would acquit him, aud whit h I didn t tell or the stand This was communicated to counsel, and they learned from S wain the lol lowing Cody and I were in Oa nesvilto, before lost term (October) of Warren petior court, at whir-'i JimCodj vas to be tried for assault with inteut to murder McGregor. Cody asked me if I was going to testify to what I knew against him I told him I would certainly swear to the truth if put on "Then I would be to the he answered 'Ot course you will baid I "There ts no possible help for it ou oogbt to plead guilty and throw yeoiaelf on the mercy of tbe court. With the influence in Warrea aud Gainesville1 you. could bring to bear, Gordon would pardon >ou "Ton are not the man I took you for eatd Cody indignantly I will never go to penitentiary. McGregor shall never nee sne> go to the penitentiary He shall not live to send me there 1 "What do you mean by inch talk I asked. 1 "I mean that I will go back to and no jury in "Warren county would me for killing McGregor THK JtTDfrE WILL OOXSIDKB "Tms evidence is rery for defense, aad we move to mtrodcca ft now Solicitor Howard and Mr Davis both Hrja4 the court to portpone argument on bis on admitttBg tbis new testimony nntii Twiggs and Mr Hal Lewis could be mooed to to hidajoc. and could expected any aweh devel- opment in the case, and bad gone to tbe eav- preme court They could be summoned here by tomorrow, and as they were leadmc counsel for the prosecution, and bad conducted the state's ease, they ought to be faere U this new evidence was admitted it might re- quire new evidence m nbottaJ and uew meat on both aides Judge decided to wait until to- oaorrow, and gire Iheae lawyers a chance to jnry tbcfaodge charge read to eatire again tetught. They know nothing ef which will be oa ttwsn luiihsiioff Twiggs and Lewie heen telegraphed lor Jones, diadat her rtaWeawe, i fceen IB irf rhr wffl ayfcar   

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