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Atlanta Constitution Newspaper Archive: March 27, 1890 - Page 1

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   Atlanta Constitution, The (Newspaper) - March 27, 1890, Atlanta, Georgia                               THE ATLANTA CONSTITUTION. PRICE FIVE CENTS. VOL. XXI. flEXEBAL_ LONGSTREET BJPOSJES A TRADE WITH HARRISOH FOR VOTES ne Old Gentleman a Hlatory of Hfc "invitation to th. Mean! Buefc Against WtsHns-QTON, March About fcndaysago.a New York paper pi.b Ushed a Wash'igton special purporting to give the for the faiKiro of the Harrison admin- Sratiou to rccogni.0 General Ixmsstreet, of reor-ia the most prommont ex-confederate who to espoused the cause ot republicanism uwai alleged among otucr things that Gen- ,raT had not v uted for Harrison and ol.l friend of General Longstreot's, who a H! is himself a dis- En-'iii-lu-a rcpuUican, wrote and asked him irheihei tho alleaJitions referred to were true Gfiior.l LonsMu-et has writen a most noteworthy reply in which he gives, thT -itory of his identification with ate republican party, recite- the facts as to his relations with tho present administration, and nvcs an inside view of the means used by the renubh.Mii in tho south to mam- hold upon the spoils of office, with- out n-'ard to the public good or even the best Interest of their party. The following a Gen- eral Ixmgst root's letter: THE TEXT OF THK I.BTTKK. I did not ejxirciae the privilege of Buck well knows, and he probably also know that, by the recognition by the republican admin- istration, we could have brought several state, of the south into indorsement of the party nominee, in 1892, and in that way he and his little coterie would nave been lost sight of in all further convention.. WHY BUCK I will say that I would not have thought of go- Ingto Indianapolis, but for the preridential invi- tation to do so, and would not have thought of taking active part in politic, again but lor tbe en- couragement received during that visit. It to me that the incoming administration had a grand opportunity to bring our people, BARNES OF GEORGIA A. SFEVCH THE aOVSE AGAINST WYOMING'S ADMISSION, He Show, the Illegality of the -rwjrltorial Convention, and Beason the BepubU- canB Support Admission. March .ntative George T. Barnes, of Augusta car- and south, back Into that graceful riod off the in the debate of the bill for the admission Jl wuin.. ill ___ tuna I uiiln tifUl progress made by the country In the last thirty-five year, which had not been met by similar objections. The constitution, ho said, was perpetually invoked by narrow, ana rigid, arid illiberal constructionists as an ffort to ben Au seperable barrier against every effort to benefit thecondition of the people. The people of tlie United States did not regard the constitu- tion with superstition or awe. They knew that there v. as something more venerable than charters, more sacred than constitutions, and that waa the rights and privileges which the charters and constitutions were ordained to establish and to maintain. Mr. Ingalls then proceeded to argue that his amendment did not violate thn constitution m any respect, and that there was a wide differ- ence between it and a revenue measure, lie affirmed that the bill was, in no ever, a bill for raising revenues, and was, not obnoxious to the that aH revenue measures must originate in tho house of represcntatlv es. Mr. Butler offered an amendment extending the provisions of the bill to stocks and banks. Mr'.'lngalls inquired whether stocks and bonds were to be taxed by the pound or bushel. THE LAST MEETING. KMFEKOK. A LITTLE INCIDENT IN THE STREETS. Carriage b Detained by an Ac- cident and Tbe I.adie> Gather Around tbe Chancellor and Frecent Bouquet. AJfO HEUK'S ASOTIIKK. tangled in the traces. ouire of an application made a year ago, net with anv thought of seeing the president, and I only made a tonnal call there at the usual general re- -how to affair. but of pardon, to excuse myself will re- hoped T'Ton-t know for this long new ctpres.ions for as will expressions of very much considera- tion Verv truly yours, J. I.OMM. ii i-.u-rs nnovoiiT OUT. jnmii i-.u-rs nuovoiiT our. N B -1 still have tlio three letters of the prcsi- lent that v> ere referred to in this letter I should ibl it a d r ovrrwhelmmg, and there were many republican, who failed to vote for the same Jealo., manj colored men not only lai.cd to the republican, andldate, but voted for -de. Now. tlm ind.fltrenee ,5 due, to a it extent, to tho management of the so-called in organizati-.n, controlled by Colonel Siuk ml "n- associates. They have driven all Jheu- of the party in tho state from active o as ex-Senator Jo.l...a 11.11 and Jolmatlmn Narcross, who was bliean candidate to run for governor. nominees, thus making their (.1 double revenue. Of this we took con- e evidence to Washington at the inaugura- b the member, sitting away out on scmi-cucular tier of scats laid as.do their pens and newspapers to Hsten to the Georgian, lie was really eloquent. His speech was compre- hensive, his analysis keen, and his logic irresist- There1 was just enough humor in it to give ash of vivacity, and what the French call THK DKI.KOATK UNHORSED. The astute delegate from Wyoming crossed lances with him once, but Mr. Barnes un- d him so quickly and neatly that he was ire from the arena. Subsequentlj Strabble, of Iowa, shook out his red beard, and advanced to the assault, but theAugnstan parned every adroitness which forced that sk r in discomfiture, ana to Jo.l. the last le. tl... li-t may be added all the prom inent re- Ihey can f 1 is of the -tate-for they can I.. i "me reconciled to be led or managed by the au-.-..t of tbe Wa.hn.gton government with his contingent of carpet baggers and negroe.. By .gement tbe partj is composed of about cnrm-h hold the United States state offices un- der rviniblii an administrations, and they control tliei p-ace. by se.i.ling themselves as delegates to the nominatin WITH HABKISON. (OKUESPO After Hie election ol 18BS I wrote a simple letter to the president-elect upon the illt To tins I received a prompt reply from in an mv itation to go to Indianapolis be e us. lew ballot at the pole, much as be prom.-ed the to the nominating convention hrew tbe federal offlce. of Oeorpa into the n moon o r. dopted including woolen goods and whisKy iid all kinds of intoxicating drinks within the irovisions of the bill. Mr. Grav said that he did not believe in ing a house in order to get ria of rats> erturning the constitutional government e burni n ove reference structions n order to get rid of some evils which states were able to deal with of themselves. He offered as a substitute for the bi.l an amendment prepared by Mr. George, and said that it seemed to him to have very carefully cousideied the question of what legislative po-.ver conferred by the constitution, was ap- propriately applicable to the circumstances. Mr. Uullom moved to refer the bill and all the amendments back to the nuance coimuit- toe. Mr. Hawley moved to amend by to tho judiciary committee with im to report back within a fortnight. The motion to refer to the judiciary commits toe was ruled to be out of order, and the ques- tion was taken on Mr. Cullom's motion to refer to the finance committee, and it was re- 17; nays 31. Mr. Hawley then renewed his motion to refer the hill and amendment to the judiciary committee. The motion was at 6.15 o'clock, moved to ad- journ. Negatived. The question was token on the substitute offered.by Mr. Gray, and it was 18; nays Cockrell and Reagan BERLIN. March farewell audience betvv een the emperor and Frmco Bismarck was held this morning. The iaterv lew lasted three-quarters of an liour. The retiring chan- cellor was heartily cheered ou his way to the palace by crowds which had gathered along the route. THK LADIES' TRIBUTE. As tho prince was driving past the bridge, betvv con Lusgarten and Under Den Linden, his horses shied and one of them became eu- It was necessary to larness was re- gathered about lirew him bou- to him. Prince _______o_____ itedtUathe shed tears. He shook" hands with a number of those about his carnage aiidliis voice faltered as he thanked them for their demonstrations of affection. The accident was of a trifling nature and as soon as the harness was arranged, the prince resumed his drive amid ckeers. Bismarck's passage through the streets, while on. his way to visit the emperor and erand duke of Baden, was a veritable triumphal procession. The people wanted lo unharness the horses and drag the carriage themselves. Those nearest the, carriage thrust in their carase dent vvHich delayed the prince's progress. The emperor permits Bismarck to retain the title of prince.with that of duke of Laueuburg, as second distinction. AKQRY WITH THE TAPBHS. The Post learns from a trustworthy source that has expressed dissatisfaction because many papers have exaggerated, or eu- erteS, n.s critical rernata i on the oc- caSon of his visit to the offices of the general S-Sf which eave rise to the rumor that Count Von WalderSe would be transfered to another of these letters nere signed by the preb Good friends in Atlanta were anxious to go out hands and underline of the carpet-l> Somb .onthem men, WtnieT have been appointed, but none can pre- tend that their influence at home is greater than ttefr leaders. On th. contrary ,t be neces- arily Attachment March 2B -Mr. McPherson, from the committee on naval affairs, reports a joint resolution authorizing the secretary of the navy to remove the naval magazine from Ellis island, in Now York harbor, and to tion suspending te coecion o articles of merchandize that are made the sub- site for and to eiect a naval maga- ject of trust or combination. Mr. Edmunds voted with the democrats in the affirmative, no democrat voting in the negative. Mr. Vest mosed to increasethe license for dealers in options from to 810.000. Adopted on a rising vote. The bill, which had been considered all the time as in tho committee of the whole, was re, ported to tho senate, whore all amendments have to be acted upon again, and where other amendments may be offered. Mr. Ingalls asked unanimous consent to object for the rea- THE EMPEROR AND THE POPK. The Freichsanzeiger publishes the letters that passed between Kniperor William and the pope on the subject of the labor conference. ThVemperor's letter, in which he inclosed the nnounces that proramme rs e, of the announces that KoTip is thoroughly imbued with the pope's idea? and wrfl materially contribute to the William upon taking the field for a, resrolute effort in a worthy cause, which meets the pope's heartiest wishes. Parliamentary Election. LOTOOM, March 2B.-An election in.Ayr The Treasurer of Maryland CllCrgW With Misappropriating Funds. ANXAPoLIm. Md., March sent a message to the legislature tonight tranat muting a communication from L. Victof Baugham, state comptroller. The cumpUolM states that he has discovered a tiou of state securities in the hands oi Treasurer Stevenson Archer Treasurer Archer is lying critically ill at home. The Baltimore Sun's Annapolis .pedal Bays: MEV CRIED LIKE The message from the governor came like ft shock to tbe members of the legislature. presiding officers and some of the senators had been previously sent for by Governor Jackson, and were told of tbe affair. Secretary of State LeCompte carried a copy of the message into each house, and n hen tho business then up was disposed of, it was read. The scene in the house, which was full of people was almost indescribable. fell back in their seats, speechless for the time, and it vv as a strange s.ght to see men crying like children. All unfounded report w as circulated during the excitement that a telegram had beeureceived from Blair, stating that Mr. Archer was dead, but tins was soou contradicted. Both houses adjourned at once. It was Comptroller Baugbmau's discovery of the hypothecation of securities held by the state that led to the disclosures, and it was letter that Gov ernor Jackson used as a basut for the message to the legislature. WHAT THK COMPTROLLER SATS. Comptroller Bftughmau reiterated the stance contained m his letter. He said: "Two of the notes that I have traced are for and respectively. I don't know tho character or the amounts of the securities. Tbe safe deposit vault at Baltimore stands in the name of the state treasurer, and no else can have access to it. On Monday I in Baltimore, with the _ govemol and attorney general. We telegrams to Mr. Archer, but his stopped the proceed! igs. It was my duty state comptroller to lay the facts, as far as I knew them, before the government, and thero was nothing else for me to do. It is not pos- sible to know what is the condition of tho state securities, because the) are locked up m the safe deposit vault. I cannot say anything as to the probable amount involved m tho A dispatch was received by the governor late tonight saying that Archer's condition was much easier The bond of the state treasurer is SJUI.UUU. The involv emeiit of tbe name of State Treas- urer Archer, with the illegitimate use of of the state, was so unexpected to every one that his are not 5 et able to fully realize it. Whatever tbe amount of defalcation, tlio state is secured._______________ A TALUF.P SVOOESTIOK. From a State Senator of Kentucky to Hern tnjrway. JACKSOX, Miss., March The following letter was published in the city papers this evening. Mr. J. B. Hemingway, a brother of el-Treasurer Hemingway saya thatOie letter was entire y nnsolicited stand what tbe propositions are. Mr. Butler, atU.30, moved to adjourn. Hot aareed 23, nays (a party vote.) M? Butler then moved to proceed to the consideration of executive business. The motion was agreed to a bnel executive session the senate at adjourned till tomorrow. and Sinclair v nation- gar. There was no opposition. Opinion, on BaLtour-a BUI. K.OHTS. The Wyoming Bill Cause, a Discussion on Woman Suffrage. Tomorrow the previous que uestion is to be con- the Wyom- sums than ttose in Gladstone's scheme. FnncliTs MOT-MI 2fi__Punch publishes a arch. jiamuaii, _ at wort ten per day. and Jfwn of tho two year.. LEr state Scnatof. A OBBAT TOKtO. d wa four month, room most of the tune in hed. m rKT'vKtS M.V 1S1VOE OF A SICK AtAK. Dmrng my sickness a'l kinds of report, were ..rTSd arJm, m. the junior democratic senator r well as political grounds. As tic party idont Dnion made a rcprtj'MMiwju, uiuv. he defended the'provision of the constitution and tbe territory extending the right of suf- "ifr of Mo., favored the admission of now states as rapidly as tho increase of pop- ulation in the territories warranted. But he insisted on calling a spade a spade. Mr Gates, of Alabama, said that no new state'bad ever come into the union on terms tins case-that women were have the rignt to vote and to hold office. It was a delicate question and he looked with aladde aladder- side BA8BBAU. MATTEB8. Decision to the Caa. Agalnrt -Bnck" Ewlug. K, March 26.-In the case of the Cache j a tnp to Cuba by that company. A CONFEDERATE CAMP. City Organize One. WKW YORK, March 26.-The ex-confederate S- Li) c.tv propose to inaugurate a for tins no more con- hose who iiwi ftr- and renew the Sherman) to say the on actual tbe negroafi and and BT DKMOCBATS. IWatwmites In TranWe. io woman suit rr .Kof menal, and his judgment of history was that it was not wise to Intrust the government to wunttn. If the bill passed the house code would have to be changed, for otherwise the speaker might have to recognize a lady repre- senting Wyoming as a gentleman from Wyo- mMr.' Morey, of Ohio, spoke in rapport of the bill and advocated the civil and legal enfran- women in all states ojjhe Mr. Mansur, of which remained, addressea country, if not to the house count, there were not twelvehuenitfers m seats) and said that the slim attendance re- mfnded him of the fact that the house was briiunne a state into the union by the Ciesanan overlain" rather than witl. the care and com- fortwlrlch gurroTonded the accouchment ot an honorable member of an honorable family. TheTnouse then, at took a nsceas ontU 11 o'clock tomorrow.________ SHB WBOTK TOtattK CZAR, And Waa Sentenced to Siberia for Mary KANSAS Cat, March KWO, Metropolitan Exhibition company aga.nst "Buck" Ewing, asking for an injunction to men received ere w Another Bad Breah. where etae. Kich- their lives. n rs. of tae Keenan ticulars March 26.- George today furniahed additional par- in regard to the well-known Mar, about to be exiled who s aou Siberia for having written a personal letter, ncerntag the cza.. political subjects, and IntioniBt. At Richmond, Va-Baltimore 11; Jacksonville.-Philadelphia 8; Brook- by the of previous years. The Won. TELE GRAPH BRE VITIBS Mrs. Harrison Ind party k.' of Vork. veter omnmii Qf (he nSSriea. it, however, as harmless, as it service comrmssion- Senatorial Caoena, voted on land forfeiture v in an or an< but He regarded it, no' HH Ber to TAMOOOA, Tenn., March [Spec- Sllvey, of Woweiy Bnowh, with James ial-WilUam Slvey, o Ga., arrived here yesterday in searah ot hw and two chiluren, who Jeft home last Sunday. He found them h James Mals.whoha, here. W TnurnSn had receiv, prtSSert is Sved with great expected nothing short Colonel Thnrman gave faction during Garfield-Arth red the Ln waa re- prohibit The Bond Scheme Carried. enn., March 26. [Spec- to Cauittanooga ial Wta otf to Cauittan Jodiy toridedio issue Will 1 Friend. jesterday of paralyi Boykfl ta iNEWSPAFERr iNEWSPAFERr   

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