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Atlanta Constitution: Monday, March 10, 1890 - Page 1

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   Atlanta Constitution, The (Newspaper) - March 10, 1890, Atlanta, Georgia                               THE ATLANTA CONSTITUTION. VOL. XXI. GA., MONDAYt MORNING, MARCH 1O, PRICE FIVE CENTS. THE TWO BILLS to rxxrxyT rax Of STATES FOR CONGRESSIONAL PURPOSES. KcCmna'ft Bill 1 >V hat a Prominent lawyer Says In Regard to State and Federal Rights. March 9 cratic and republican members ol congress alike are right now ery much exercised as to tlu constitutionality of congress regulating the redistnctmg of states For some time the Hoar and AVickham bills, to prevent the re- diitiittmg of Ohio at the present time, have been discussed largely by the democrats However Mr McComas, of Maryland, has re introduced a ingenious measure which the republicans seem determined to The bill is for the purpose of check- tho moves of the democratic legisla- ture of Ohio and Man laud in redistncting tlioM st ites, so as to increase the democratic representation from these states in congress THE M'tOMAS BFLL The McComaa bill provides that congress- men shall be elected by districts which shall o as near I j as practicable an equal num- ber of inhabitants and the districts shall be composed of "territory that n contiguous ad- jacent and compact That after each census shall reapportion, and the legislature of each state elected next thereafter shall re- t tmder these restrictions ns to popula- tion ind territory, and when made shall not be a'ured until the next census That until the next apportionment under the clev t nth census there shall be no change of boundary, and represen tat iv es to the fiftj-second congress shall be elected from the same districts as those from which members of the fifty-Orst were elected anj of state heretofore or hen ifter to be passed to tho contrary notwith- standing Also that certifying boards of each sta'c authorized and required bj the law of such state, to cam ass and declare the result of elections of members of congress in addi- tion to the facts now required bj the statutes of the V in ted States, to be set forth m the cer tihcates shall further certify that such reprc sen aa been elected to represent the districts constituted and composed of the terntorv in conformity with this act, and that such districts in respect to territory nml state, enacted before or after tlie passage of this and -such certificates onlj shall be re cei-ved bv the clerk of tbe next house m mak- ing up tho roll In case of the failure or refusal of the stnte certifying board to sign and forward such cer tihcate, the clerk in making up the roll of tin next house, may receive in lieu thereof re- turns of local canv issmg boards or officers of districts as sufficient certification of the repre- sentatives elected, and shall file such returns lii the office of the clerk of the honse The bill is, indeed, very ingeniously worded, and if passed, the Ohio democrats would be paral> zed If they attempted to rim congres- sional candidates in the new districts appor- tioned ui the redistnetmg bill, which recently passed the house of tbe Ol 10 legislature The only hope of the democrats is that such a measure is unconstitutional If the bill is on firm constitutional grounds, then the Democrats cannot depend on Ohio and Mary land to increase their numbers m the next congress A LAWYER'S OPINION Judge Chipman, of Michigan, one of the greatest constitutionil lawyers on the demo- cratic side of the house, said this evening in epeakmg of the McConiasbill "It is based on the fourth the first article of the constitution, which confers on the states (he power to prescribe times, places and manner of holding elections for senators and representatives, 'but reserves to congress the power to make and alter such regulations as to the places choosing senators This does not in express terms designate who shall establish representative districts The supreme court of tho United States bah liad this section under consideration and lias decided that congress may these regulations m whole or m part and prescribe punishments for infraction of tho state as well as of tlie federal law regulating congressional It has also decided that the power congress is exclusive of every other power when constitutionally exorcised, and that all powers necessary to the exercise of an ex pressed power are to be implied In ox-pnrte "Yarbrough, the court, refers with approbation to two notable instances of the exercise bv. congress of the power to alter state regulations JTirst, that body prescribed that representatives should be elected in districts, as now, instead >f in the state at large, second, in 1871 It prescribed that representatives should be elected in all the stetes on the same day Any one ran see the tendency of these decis- ions, and this action is to give congress perfect control of the actual conduct of the election All this leaves the broad question, 'Who shall establish the congressional There is no express constitutional provision on th? subject, but H must be distinctly rscogmzed that the existence of districts is the work of cxmgroas Tins is the present status of the questions arising under the McComaa bill. I not leave the field of power and enter -that of discretion, except to say that if con- gress has the power to district tbe states, it be w ise not to exercise it OBOKGIAVS IN WASHINOTOIT Quite a distinguished party of Georgians spent a portion of today here, on their return to Georgia The party is trav elmg in a ate car, and is composed of General E P Alex Captain E P How oil, Colonel Pat Calhonn, Captain Harry Jackson and Major A O. Bacon W B MISS OSAKA'S APPJEAE Tor Honey to Aid tlie Destitute in the Da- kolas. Darch Clara Barton, president of the American National associa- tion'bf the Red Cross, has been investigating the statements concerning suffering and desti- tution existing among tho pioneer settlers of Jforth and South Dakota, with the view of aiding those in need of I She has ascer- tained that there is urgent necessity for im- xnedtnte action, aud now appeals to the public ior cash subscriptions large enougli to meet every emergency She lias information that there are at least fi v o thousand people depen- dent, and many moro who, though tiiey have THIS WKKK IN COMGXIKSS. Work the Senate and House Have Before Tbcm, WASHINGTON, March uncertainty surrounding the dispositions of the questions raised by the recent consideration of executive session matters, makes it Impossible to fore- cast, with any degree of accuracy, the work of the senate for this week. Senator Dolph'.s committee will tomorrow resume the Investi- gation, under oath, of members of the senate respecting their connection with "leaks" in the past, and the report of their discoveries may precipitate another discussion similar to that of last week So mnch of the time of tha senate was taken up with that discussion, that tbe Bla'r educational bill was not disposed of, and it still heads the calendar as unfinished busi- ness A very general feeling exists in fjwor of closing the debate this week and of taking a vote on the bill, if possible But that maj not Tie secured until a week from tomorrow Mr Higghis, ef Delaware, is announced for a speech in favor of the bill on Monday, and Mr arts will close the debate in support of the measure. Tlie rejiort of tho committee on privileges and elections on the Montana case is likely to be made this w eek b it the that must ensue will not begin until the bill is out of the way The urgency deficiency apnropi lation bill w ill be rep HE CLUTCHES HIM BY THE THROAT. Tbe T.nnatlo Vires Shot After Shot. Bat Betalns Her Till Blood Oasbes From His Nostrils, and Then In the morning hours the Oklahoma town site bill maj be considered, and further pro- gress made in execution of the order to dis- pose of public building and bridge bills on the calendar WHAT THK HOLSF WILL DO The work of the house this week will proba- bly be devoted principally to adding new sta s to the national flat; Tho District of Columbia committee will occupy tomorrow in tho disposi- tion of measures relatmp to local affairs, and af- ter that tho OklihnmabiH will be tikon up and passed upon finally ns far as the house is con- cerned Then, accmdmg to notue already given the territories committee will present foi tho consideration of the house a bill to ad mi t "Wyoming as a state of tlie union, arid tins will be by the Idaho bill If am .line remains the committee 011 elections de sirea to call up the contested election of Mudd vs Cmnpton, from Mary land, but wi" only do so according to the present arrange- ment, if It can be done without with the statehood bills already mentioned THE l-ROra-SSORS ABE "OUT." And it Looks as if Ctmila UnKersity Vf> Close CHART FSTON, S C, Marrh The trouble nt Claflm university caused by the caneing of the colored chap t am has as sujned serious proportions All the exercise'! of the institution bavo been ended and the 800 colored students are said to bo parking up their effects with the intention of leav ing Chaplin the professor who was beaten, and Professor TovMT-ond, another ool orod professor, have resumed This e1 but ony moro colored member of the faculty Professor Those with President Duiitoii are paid o it of tho ClaHm fund wiili which the college was started Tho white professors aw aid 01 t of the itate fund Professor Del'rcville, the man w no assaulted Cardozo, says he w ill hold on and ivili resume Ins classes -non as the exercises oi tho college aro resumed Tho ol Orangtibuig, the town 111 which the college i- located, is reported as saving that he will call out t) e militia to protect Professci DeTrev.He if an attack is made on him President Dun ton has appealed to tho governor, who has (alfed a meeting of the board of trustees This meeting hah not >et bteii held It look1 at present as if the next biggest colored col- lege in the t.mtod Strtos wav about to molt aw ay thin air The arose over the religions revntl which Cirdoz had been conducting in the college forovc two weeks, and which De Tieville, professor of mathemetics, said had interfered seriousl1 with the work of the students Do Trevilli savs th it niton he made tins statement at a meeting of the faculty, Cardoza told him h< didu t believe him THE Kfc-BELS SUCCESSFUL. The Formosa Kioters Compel the Troops to Surrender. SAN FKAXCISCO, March from Chma, by the steamer Belgic, state that aborigines of Formosa banded and offered so determined an op- position to the Chinese troops that were trj ing to quell the Formosa riot that the com mander of the Chinese forces, after tw hundred of his men had been le  es begin to start from -twRr; sockets llii face changed from red ito a livid purple, and his tongue rolled out as gasped for breath The veins of his iioad swelled almost to nursling, but the wonian ield on Her life depended on her grip Back and forth in the room they struggled Chdfri were overturned and the table, for supnbrj was upset Tue inadii an had ceased to strjkd r anil ill biacIToits were to break her on Ins tliroat Ho began to weaken SIIF VVrSS HKR LIFE At last the blood spurteJ from his and the sight os this w as more the poor vo- iiian ronld stind She relaxed her hold and Ik d from tao house to the nearest neighbors ind the polite were called As soon as he freed from Mrs Peterson's grasp the mail man slunk to the attic of the housa In a shoit time the Hmmaii patrol wagon armed ind Officer Birmingham up to the top f ilio house to fi trh tho maniae dow n It n is no cisy matter Tho fiend had partially itcoiue 1 Jas stzeugth from tho tfulfhi V njr and was at bay in a dark of the attic Fortimate-K m the struggle. the follow hml dropped his As soon as the ofnrei entered the dmilj -lighted room tho n a rush for him Then came another fight, but the olhcer was fresh and the in ulman bidly winded from the struggle he hid had With Airs I'eterson in the kitchen As he closed ui on the officer tlia ma'iiac gave a hoarse. yell that sounded more, like a roarof a wiH than like a hnman cry mcor imally tlncw the fellow aiiJ he w is manacled and taken to tho llmuian street po- lice station He re lie became more quiet Nothing could be le uucd from him, however, fuitlor than his nine was Albert Jenssen, .ml that he had escaped fiom a Michigan m- asylum After him he was taken to the hospital PRONOUNCED INSANE. Jolin Oieoit, Who Murdered His Sweetheart I.ttBt Year. N 4 ZE.I.K Tonn MarcJi 9 [Special] Dr T II Cil lender, Buperui ten dent of the iimne asvlum, has made a critical examina- tion of John Green the Putnam county mur- 

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