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Atlanta Constitution Newspaper Archive: February 14, 1890 - Page 1

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Publication: Atlanta Constitution

Location: Atlanta, Georgia

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   Atlanta Constitution, The (Newspaper) - February 14, 1890, Atlanta, Georgia                               VOL. XXI. ATLANTA. GA., FRIDAY MORNING, "FEBSPAW 14, PAGES. PRICE FIVE CENTS. THE BANQUET! The First Annual Spread of the Chamber of Commerce. THE DISTINGUISHED GUESTS Who Came From the East and From the West TO CHEER THE GflLLiHT CITY Which Has Risen From the Ashes of War A Micre s bo 01 1 il tl it the most enthusi- astic iiiumbcr oC bo chamber could e was the first ni 11 al banquet of the chamber of coir uerce at the Kmiball last mght ASK cess in all its dinner whitl in its appoii tn cuts siTrpassed anj thing re gn en in then bcjond and L! at of icason and of soul baiiqu t fuim-jhed b> t ie d siin- gui t 1 the 1 onon d gutbUs and w h hoiio-cd tl e occasion their rrt Pr  3 last woik for All mta II cuthusiaoin was contagious, Ins work wa i i t the success of tho w Ork w as p e nieiial tl in a few all the membershij s weu taken The business men of Atlanta once thtir attention so earnestly and forcib directed to the were themselves en ihusiastic The association became an e, thoroughly equipped thorough going bodj There was not a place in the ranks Today thtro is not in tne United States a ci amber of common: e more tl r nighly or crtd talilj rei resentatne of a hi smcss com n n tj It is a success honor to the citv when f-v place wasfllel the pi ins w ere irate 1 for an annual binq ict It tl is again Mr Gralywas deepl> inter esled Lntil the daj he left Boston his whole tune r as given to this wrrk Ho 11 aimed well and w rkc 1 earnestly He It ft tl at work unfinished but left it in good lian 1 His plans wire earned out his woik. fiuisl ed In Foston and 111 Xe after hi> giett GI ccfh w as ma le he ersonally ted many and irgcd em to (01 e To thoce lie v as un il IP to meet he wrote Amongst thfse latter w is emc r Cai it 1 ell Como Mr Gridi wiote come an' lot us feel that the peoj !e of Cecilia aie as as the people of Ohi and New "i.oik Tl ere w ere many laat night that came at bis bi 1 Un VI OF THE P VKTY With -from New York, several from Boston, and others from other places, 3 esterday and the day before OTECBK GUESTS, "Who Arrived at Different Times During: the Day A nnmber of gnests arrived on the morning and afternoon trains se% oral on the Wednes- day night trains They were Hon "W E Hosse1! ex mayor of Janibndge Moss Mr Charles H Taj lor ed tor of the Boston Globe Mr E P "Witbns, Mr PatCalhoun Mr William "VVilwra, H B Chamberlain of Col Frank Hnckins, of Boston C H Phmi7v of Augusta, E B ".tall man of NosbMlle T TV Robertson, of Thomas H Carter, of Kichmond- These gentlemen were in charge of a special committee which w as on hand to meet theni on their arm al During thf day these guests were shown over the city by different members of the com- mittee and shown every attention that could make their visit pleasant Many of theae early arming guests joined nber of Guests from Sfe-vy lorfc, Boston iiid Ohio The n i n party of guests came in last en in at 7 o c'ock on tlie extern and Atlantic Tlio trim was at four but there Wat, some del ij in Iciwnj Cliattanooga Tlie tioi Poniinitttcs were ill on hind, ilio gli uhen the t'lm did come To receive the >ow ork there weie Cai ta n E P Howell Mr S M Ii man Mr E P Uimbeilm Mr J J Siallug Mr "W Maj >r Minis ffnd Mr Julius L The Boston ere receive! Hon Bufus B Bullock Mr 11 D Spilding M- W A Hemihill Mr George Hilher Mr John A F tten Mr J N I aiikin and Mr "W E JLowe The Ohio isitors v ere met by Air Ho'te Smitb Mr C A C 11 er Mr Albert C Mr J Is. Ohl Mr b F "W oodiow Mr 1 I, PSIBF and Mi F Mir-.li A fourth coniiuittce on 1 inrl to e the ts fiom otl er j lares This committee Mi Martin F Amorous Mr Tua Hirsch Mr Tr Mi H II Cabamss Mr K J Jordan Major M C Riser and Mr "W FS Tliomson As the train stopped there TV as a general rush a general greeting and hand-shaking and guests and burned accross to the Kimball From New York there were Mr John B Inuiau Mr Charles O Smith president of the New York chamber of commerce Ml J Edward Simmons, president of the New York fcoard of education Mr A Foster Hjggms Mr F A Thurber Mr John -V Stewart, Mr John Sloane, Mr B John E Parsons, Mr James S Smith, Mr E. T Wilson Jr Mr John C Calhoun, Mr H R Garden Mr and Mrs James Swann Miss Minnie Chamber lain, Mr John, Hall, Mr and Mrs G J "Wetzler From Boston there were Kr and Mrs Stephen B Simmons, Mr George "W Morse Mr and Mrs "Weston Davis Mr and Mrs L Eicnardson Mr and Mrs John J Henry, and Mr Jonathan A Lane, president ol the Boston board of trade From Ohio came Governor James B Camp- bell, Mr Lee H Brooks, Mr G H Burrows Jtfr W H Meyer, General M L adjutant general of Ohio, aud Mr Claude t Meeker 3 were as specially invited guasta from other places, Mr Russell B Harrison, the only KOI of the president, Hon W L Wilson ol Virginia, and Mr William H. Wilson These bats do not include a considerable tad urttod, PRESIDENT OGLESBY the special committee to greet friends who came in later at the depot BEFORE THK BAN QUET. The Informal Reception In the Parlors of tlie Kimball After the Arrival From T until 8 30 o clock when the banquet hail was thrown open a delightful informal reception was held in pailors 104 and lOb, which had been arranged as headquarters Here tlie guests were recon od by the recep tion committee and a general introducing was done hen the Tnman party arrived and was es- corted from the depot the reception commit- tee and many n embers of the chamber were in waiting to lecene them The guests who had armed inng tho dav were also present After a flbrief handshaking the guests were shown to the room arrtnged for them to prepare for the banquet Lpon their appear ance they were taken in ch of the special committee and formal introductions ma le ernor Campbell was one of the last to appear He was immediately tho c te announced the opening of tl c Ian juet hall "Wurm s orchestra was stationed at the en trance A lively march was struck up and shortly President Ofclesb} w itb ernox Campbell on his right, and Hon Charles S Smith president of the New chamber of commerce appeared Following President Oglesbv Governor Campbell and Mr Smith came Governor Gor TTILSON din with Hon "W illiim L %V ilaon and Mil or Glenn with Hen "W E Russell and lion Pat Calhoun with Hon J A Lane These the speakers Following them ctme other siiest-s each escorted b> a meui bor of the chamber of commerce and following these the members of the chamber in twos About ten minutes were required for the en- trance, and at just fifteen minutes to nine o'clock all were in their seats The floor committee was Martin F Amorous D "W Ampler H A Boynton, Thos B Paine, J F Simons, Geo Sciple, Joseph Onne J Frank Beck, John W Grant, Lewis H Beck Chas 8 Northen, Louis Gholstm, J Carroll Payne, Julius Drey- fus, "W C Bawson __________ A SCENE OF BEAUTY. Trtie Itecorations in the Banquet Kail and the Early yesterday morning the spacious dining- room, was delivered over to tbe artists and decorators day it was a scene of bustling preparation Clarance Knowles and Mr Charles Crankshaw, of the committee, were untiring in their efforts to make the banquet, from an artistic point, one of the most beautiful. That they were highly successful, the brilliant scene presented to the guests, and the words of surprise and praise uttered on. all aides was sufficient evidence. Tbe great haU looked almost like a tropical garden, eahanged and heightened in beauty RESIDENT SMITH, NEW YOKE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE by the sparkjmg brilliance of thousands of pieces ojE glass and silverware At the head of the hall the great open fire- slice was pomplete'y hidden intli palms and" ferns Across the front of the mantel was draped a largo flag its Ttfavvy folds half hidden the tall, ontspreadiiig leates of the palm The mantel jtself, roachbiR to the ceiling and presenting a glistening background of mirror was banked tathe top with exotic palms On each side of this the windows draned in flags and filled up -with potted plants making a picture of rare trop cal beautv Tust in fiont of at the head of the brilliantly festooned hall, the speakers'table was placed This was a perfect wonder of beautv The center of the table, whjch was circular was occupied by a large floral star formed, the points of yellow roses and the center of hhes of the valley and red roses Tiny incandescent electric lights peered out among the roses and lilies of the star prodncmg an effect of loeli ness which cannot be described In the center of the star filled with red roses and sur- rounded with hhes of the was a cat- glass -s ape inside of which sparkled a half dozen electric lights, sending their rays out among the roses petals until thej ere transparent It was one of the most beauteous pieces of the florist s art that could be imag- ined, certainly the novelest ever been in At- lanta Along the sides of the hall numberless flags were draped and each of the large -vmidowt> from the tops of which hung large loops of BOSTON COMMEBCE CHAJJBES OF Roman Punch Canvas Bach Duck witb Cresses Cuambertra Celery Mayonnaise Biscuit fllace Char otteJiuase Konnefiort and Keufcdatef Olieeiw Bent Coffee .Cordial JMfedoe The dinner was an excellent probably ihe best eirer served on a similar occasion in Atlant-v Thesemce was especiallj excel lent and was erecruently commented upon Aa the time for the speeches drew near there of some impatience. When PresidenftOglesbyTaBpedibr order a hearty clappmg-of hands was the response which greeted him then as he fcegan speaking there TV as respectful silence and interested attention Welcomes the Guests on Uehalf of the -Chamber of Commerce. When the applause which, greeted him had subsided, President Oglesby sprffce as follows Gentlemen of the Chamber of Commerce and our guests I had intended to try and get through this evening without making an apoiogy, but being1 entirely unaccustomed to the duties placed upon me, when I look around this hall and see here thff scores of distingmsed Americans repre sentmjr the important business interests of every section of tnia country frorii the Rocky mountains to the Atlantic ocean, and representing the tery liichestttypeof culture and intelligence on this continent, J feel like the Dutchman and his pony The old man had a littjepony he claimed nothing on earth could scare, but his BOH, Jacob, dida t have so mnch-fionfidenre in the staying qualities- of the pony test Tfce matter Jake THE ABSENT HOST evergreen hothouse plants of rare foliage were placed The chandeliers were festooned withsmilax and suspended fiom the ceiling at the top of each were long crescent loops of reaching to the sides and corners of the hall Each of the eight tables from end to end was banked along the center with similax and roses with here and there a setting of et otic palms On some of the tab'es the roses were all white, on others jellow, and others pink and red A pretty buttonnole bouquet was opposite each chair and the en cut-glass w me glasses to each place the table a wonder fully brilliant appeaiance The entrance was hung with flags and fes- tooned with sum lax and roses Altogether the banquettmg hall was a scene of loveliness and brilliance rare y ever beheld THt, BANQUET IS Tlie Quests Do Ample Justice to the Choice Mann For three hours the three hundred and fifty and more people present devoted themselves to a practical demonstration of their appreaa- t-ou of the good things set before them The visitors ere seated with Atlanta fnenda, as a rule and all Atlantiaits aeemed bent upon making then jri ests feel at home The following menu was served. HENU. Blue Point Oysters, Hant Santera. Bisque of Amontillado Boiled JFiench Peas. of Beef with Mushrooms. took his stand in the fence corner the old man rode up to the head of the lane and taking a firmer hold on the bridle he set his feet deeper in the stirrups and came dashing down the road in grand stj It as he passed Tike jumped out from the fenoe corner and said booh' The j ony jumped from under the old man and left him I> ing in the dirt as he rose brushing the dust from his clothing, "ivs the old man Shacob dat all righdt you shust make too big a booh, for such a tarn leetle pouj Gentlemen I m like the so I beg you overlook mj short comings this evening I am expected to siy something this evening about our chamber of commerce out an elegant response to that subject is already made by thia generous and friendly presence, therefore I shall iftt long detain >ou from the rich entertainment If I knew a word stronger more expressive or more appropriate than congratulation, I would certalnlj use it upon this occasion The first time in the historj of this city is gath ered in mutual hospitality the membership of our commercial organization The first time in the history of that organization are we assembled under oar own banner which while ouro is also the flag of forty two separate one a kingdom, yet each a w Iling subject to the same eminent, and all united in a commercial bond stronger than any other tie holding this nation together The first time are we permitted tne pleasure of mingling at our own board with those to whom as onrguebts this evening we. extend a welcome in 'warmth and sincerity beyond my poor expression For all this and for more, are j ou HOT C-H GLOBE. to be congratulated- Yoa are to be face that commercial association In an, execpsanB m New larrr- est in the eonthem states- TVjthinyour memtoer- _ is the d vt KUU. jumi mnt raSejfTFonuj-not tie built here out of the ashes of desolation and pov- ertrar splendid city With, a population of less than 10 000 In 1865, sprung to 40000m 1880 we will dose the year 1890 with, about 10D.OQO happy and prosperous people. With labor and capital workrog-togcther iii nar many Kb confusion of No cloud of commumsxn darkening the sunsmne of individual enteranse, or collttctive industry Ifeittier con trolled by plutocracy, nor pestered with paupers. ButJk city citizeps, and better than a cornttntniity pf permanent homes and name owners. Besides the raasmficent man- sions that line our beautiful avenues, jplantecl on, the lulls of this fair, city, in AH atmos- phere asrpure SB ever fitiated on mountain breeze, are the homes of Atlanta s working men. When at evening liie sleeve is drawn over these gtrong arms, around then; own firesides, and asnd-thc contsntmcnt their own "couBehold, rest the masters ftnil owners of these homes crowded t3ie aLodes of darkness, hungEr.and la me aa their mavor in presenting each with tbjfi freedom of the city are confident that it is good for >ou gentle- men to be here that you maj know us better anil let us know >ou better We arc all citizens of thia great countryand must hve together under one Hag. We have the same Anglo Saxon blood coursing through our veins, ana no matter what Issues have arisen, no other race lias permanently estranged the people of that dominant blood We believe that a personal knowledge of each otnet will beget friendship confidence and sympathy, and win draw us closer together aa citizens of this grand republic Manj of you are hundreds of miles from your homes and vi_t n itrwithstand- mg the distance jou have traveled passing through many varieties of soil and climate jott haye a right to feei aud we want j n to feal thafl j on are at homo here tonight f nr >u are still In 3 our own countrv this mignitheut country ot oure that stretches from ocean to ocean and froup lakes to gulf Our late Senator Ben Hill gave voice to the sen- timent that prevails here and all over the smiUi when he exclaimed in congress e arc in >ur Father s house our brothers ajc our and we arc at home to stav And let me say to our li if iids who may be on their first visit to this section of their country, that we have adopted thece words of the dead statesman ami we 5 leld to no part of the union in loyaltj to the union to the c natrtutimi and to the (lag and should the necessity ever anse men of the south will be found readj to def them foes from any anil everv quarter If the eminent gentleman who is tne present executive of this state will pard m me for alluding to it I wiU mention as an illustration of thia sentiment a conversation we had sbortlj aftcff his election and before his inauguration as gov- ernor of Georgia "Wo met in New York on Wall street that fateful street tliat I could never bring myself to admire and like. I look donn it with fear and tremblinz and upon it as one who treads upon tbe thinnest ice ready to Blip and fill at every step Wa chance f n that street and not for business when he t'3d me that there waa a of trouble with Mexlc and that he In tended to ask authority fr >in 1 resident levcland t organize a corps of hip old confederate vet erans and with one >ell and one ch irge they w )uld sweep the AIcxicinH fr m the face of tha uirth The general vrafi in dead oarnrst The o'd fire that Sashed upon the ImttlthHdf f rauie hick to hfsejes but was n iflwar and if there had been most I riJHant noldier of Lee arinv aftTjark >n died th na 1} and anxious to draw his feword for Ins reunited coun tr> by the present law c mid not haw talned the commission oi a tit.uunj.nt in tlit, federal annj Gentlemen it is needless for me to Rav that wO accepted m good faith the new iii-i citation, assuming all its rchponmbilmea and intending under all circumstances to dj our dut> but wa still clinfj in spite of change and to homa of tbe old fashioned of the past W c be- lieve that Hinestj IB tlu> best polity not alona In dealings between individuals hut also between the an I tli i e  ui on Tihich government la based infiipj orttng the mainly bj a tariff Ut I 1 r rt M nue nly and jua> enough for its erononiical fupport 'W e believe that the j, nernuiLnt federal state as the creator is f iporl r U> any and all ofi i i.fi creatures ami that when the of con- tr >1 Arises tbe rreator uld control the creatura inil not the creature the creator But do noO understand me as saving that the south is lagging behind Me are to keep abreast with tha tunes but we know that thesa are In ing princi- ples upon which our government should ever rest, and. that ail reform or which swings Ioos4 them will IJG hurtful and cannot lasti men t____ ____ which -while it is not indigenous, yet so early found a home in that glorious old city and baa been bo identified with Its history that it shadows all other isms and makes us fciiJnh- of whenever we think of Boston. We can nei er the cordial and hospitably reception that 1 er citizens to our own GradjP bD earned to the north his last message of and from the people of his beloved eonth- His work has been represented aa nnfin- iithed. IB it unfinished? Let the north answer. The south has spoken. A GRJSETEffC FKOH OHIO ____ beaming from tfag new histez to f Governor Campbell IB Good Ohio or President Oglesby was heartily cheered when he referred to the distinguished speaker w ho was to follow next In mtroducuog Governjr Campbell, Mr Oglesbj said The great state of Ohio has seat to ns tonight, with, a delegation, her best citizens from ent sections of the Btaie an eminent gentleman, who, in many hard foagnt battles upon her soil, has never known defeat. The political astronomers of the day arc stndy- inc with an increasing interest, and tne people wfth an increasing admiration, a star not newly risen, but whose capital city of Ohio, An eminent jurist of Georgia wants to revive aa a national air that good old song, "The CampbeHa Are and declares it to be "the hymn of deliverance for the democratic party I have tbe honor of presenting to you James E. Campbell, goTeroor of Ohio Everybody rose and aa Govereor Campbell fcowed his acknowledgements "Three cneera for Governor Campbell come from Govemor Bollock, and everybody joined in the hearty cheera and a lager, which followed. Governor Campbell spoke as follows Mr President, Gentlemen Coming nere last night upon tne tzain, cae of my tra veling canmacionsTvrho bos Bved sonie twenty years in the sooth, said to me, "Tott are golngto a ptaca wbere every man 6 an orator1' fApnlaaze-l sampled a few Epecnnensol Georgia ora- rxnaet heartily m that nave ranged Bomewttat ia overthsWIla arifl dales of tlie Eockevo commg to a land where every in ccadle of an orator, S.   

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