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Panama City News Newspaper Archive: November 10, 1952 - Page 1

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   Panama City News (Newspaper) - November 10, 1952, Panama City, Florida                                Youngster, Too III For Party, Celebrates Last Xmas Northwest Florida's Newest Newspaper PAIVAM TELEPHONE 8585 Norihwesi Florida's Most Complete Morning Newspaper WDLP-AM-FM 590 kc 98.9 me TRADE IT! See the Used Car Bar- gains in Today's Clas- sified Section. VOL 9 TWELVE PAGES UNITED PRESS (FULL WIRE SERVICE) PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA. MONDAY MORNING, NOV. 10, 1952 NEWSPAPER ENTERPRISE ASSOCIATION _________________ _____ (COMPLETE SERVICE) PRICE FIVE CENTS House YOUNG LEUKEMIA VICTIM- Little Earl Cregson, 9. will celfr- brate his birthday and Christmas early this >ear. Earl is suffering from leukemia and isn't expected to live until his birthday in Nov- ember, his mother, Mrs.. Tom Gregson, right, has planned a Christmas Tree, Carols, and "open house" for his friends to celebrate and early holiday with him. Among his presents is a of cowboy boots. Leukemia Victim j Jersey r Fuzzy- FAIRBANKS. Nov 9 (UPi KT.P-V ear-old Eail Git-son cele- bia'et Ivs last C'nns.nia.s ond his last biihtday todav. j-o weak fro-m lejken-.ia he cculdn't even have a pany Eai's parents Mr and Mrs. Tom Greg-op, open house in- stead of thp DIE paitv had planned Oriv a friends were pei nutted 10 Mis Giegson said her son who Is dvins; fiom the diead leukemia, was'too weak for anv excitement "Too much confuiion worries him Mrs Gregsnn said, "and ve were piraid he might get woried and become much w oi.se if he had too many guests today." The Gressons, planned the com- bination Christmas and birthday party for Earl because doctois said the boy won't live until his tenth birthday, Nov. 21. Earl has been suffering from the blooo disease since last. Apul. He has been under treatment seven times dunng the past seven months at Houston hospitals, and Mrs. Giegson can't keep count of the bloo-i transfusions he has had. He is not supposed to know how I seriou> his condition is, but his (Turn to LEUKEMIA, Taffe 2) ALL SET FOR distinctive mother-daughter team. Mrs. Milton Parkr1-, left and her daughter. Miss Idella Parker. Tallahassee, both graduates of Florida State, are all -t to enjoy homecoming festivities at the university November 14-15. Mrs. Parker graduated in 1911, ihe daughter in 1949. Mother-Daughter Team Is All Ready To Celebrate Big FSU Homecoming Rita, My Read To Ink Agreement For Separation PARIS. Nov. 9 (UP for Rita Ha-vwoith and Pnnce Aly Khan will sign a separation agree- ment here tomoriow clearme the way for the screen star's divorce from her wealthy puncc, it was announced tonight. Miss Kay worth's auoiney. Bart- lev Crum, said he would sign The sepai auon document with Chailes Torem. Aly s lawyer and added that Rita is "delighted with jov at the idea of recovering her Cium said the agreement would solve the two most troublesome problems which had halted pi og- ress in Rita's divorce proceedings in Reno Miss Ha v worth's lawyer said Rita would keep the couple s three- year-old daughtei. Yasmin, and that an agi cement had been reach- ed on how much Aly would pay for the girl's upkeep. He however, to reveal terms of the He said the final divorce pro- ceedings would take place later and would be conducted both in Paris and in the United States, agreement. A mother daughter team of dis- tinction at the Florida State Uni- versity Homecoming celebration, Nov 14-15, will be Mrs. Milton Parker and Miss Idella Parker, residents of Tallahassee. Bolt are giaduates of the uni- versity, and both of their classes, 1911 and 1949. will have reunions at the 1952 FSU Homecoming. Mrs. Parker, who will be re- membered by classmates as Ome- rea Hclloway, was president of her senior class. Another of her daugh- ters. Mrs. H. G. Hutchmson of Falls Church, Va the former Mary Emily Paiker, was likewise presi- dent of her senior class, in 1939. A third daughter, Dorothy, now Mrs Ed. Fairell of Jacksonville, has the same Alma Mater. She was graduated in 1940. The three older graduates in this Parker fam- ily attended Florida State College for Women which became Florida State University in 1947 by legisla- tive act. Idella is the only member who was a co-ed, just her last two jeais Mother and all three daughters followed a similar pattern by earn- ing degrees on the same campus, and as members of the same so- (Turn to MOTHER, Page 2) Polk County Couple Missing; Searchers Find Capsized Boat AVON PARK. Fla.. Nov. 9 (UP) hunted over Lake Ar- buckle with hehts tonight, seeking a Polk County couole who have been missins since theV went fish- Ing Salurdav. The missing couple was identified as Ruth Canniro. 27. Winter Haven telephone operator, and Arthur Jones. 38, of Bowling Green. Their overturned boat was found todav. Weather Bureau Sees Cioudy Skies, Cooler Winds Today, Tomorrow The U S Weather bureau pre- dicts cloudv skies with showers and cooler weather'for Northwest Fior- Ida today and Tuesday, with south- erly winds on the coast from fresh to strong today. Allied Treatment of War Prisoners TOKYO, Nov. 9 cenior Communist truce negotiator at Panmuniom lodged another protest today asamst Allied treatment of Communist war prisoners. Lt. Gen. Nam II. in a letter ad- diessed to Lt. Gen. William K. Harrison, senior United Nations armistice delegate, and delivered by liaison officers, said: "Your side wounded 21 of our captured personnel in your priso- ner of war camp on Pongam-Do. I hereby lodge a protest with you regarding this incident. Your side absolutely cannot escape the full responsibility for the war crime of pei scenting smd butchering priso- ners of war." The Nov. G incident was an- nounced zy the U. N. prisoner of war command two days later. Communist civilian internees on Pongam Island shouted insults and gathered m large groups in direct violation of orders. A South Korean aimy platoon restored order, in- juring 21 inte-rnees. none seriously. Government Urges Small Businesses Take Sub-Contracts WASHINGTON, Nov. 9 (UP) The government urged small ness firms today to consider sub- contracting as a means of getting a share of defense business The Small Defense Ad- ministration announced issuance of a special booklet desicaed to help the little businessman get sub- contracts if he wants them. A subcontract is an agreement to make parts for a larger firm that has a contract with the gov- ernment. The booklet noted subcontracts would make ii easier for the little firm to get materials if they are scarce, to secure financial help from, the government and to stav in business if civilian production is lew. It cautioned, however, that sub- contracting poses many problems including possible loss of normal markets between subcontracts. Union Officials, Management Pays Homage To Murray Times MONDAY. High 2.46 a. m.: low .1 m. lh a. m. and p. m.; low. 1 35 a. m. j Prominent Inventor Dies In Palm Beach LAKE WORTH, Ma., Nov. 9 (UP) William Norman Booth, prominent automotive inventor, died today at a West Palm Beach Hospital. He was 86. Booth was credited with invent- ing the demountable rim auto- mobile wheel and the automotive spoke wheel. He held a long list of U. S and foreign automotive patents. Booth settled here four years ago after retiring as chief engineer and vice piesident of Kelsey Hayes Wheel Co., Detroit. PITTSBURGH. Nov. 9 Top union and management oifi- cials joined today in paying hom- age to Philip Murray, president of the CIO and United Steelworkers Unions, whose sudden death was announced in San Francisco. Admiral Ben Moreell. chairman of the Board of Jones Laughlm Steel Corp reflected the feelings of those who knew the straight- shouldered Scottish immigrant who rose to lead laboring men. Moreell said "The of Phil Muri ay's untimely death is a shock to me. I feel that I have lost a true friend. We did not always see ej'e to eve. yet it would be a mir- acle if men of strong convictions were always in complete agree- ment. Korean Commies Assail 4 IHIs On Eastern Froul By ROBERT GIBSON Press Staff Correspondent TOKYO. Mon.. Nov. 10 More than North Korean Communists attacked four United Nations hills on the eastern front early todav and captured prized "Anchor Hill." dominating peak of the sector south of Kosong. Reports fiom the long dormant eastern front said Allied forces im- mediately counterattacked and at dawn today were fighting again for the crest of Anchor Hill. Two battalions of the rebuilt North Korean army slammed into the U.N. positions along a nearly two-mile front late Sunday night and battled to the top of the vital hill at 4-05 am. today (2 p m. EST A thunderous ailillery and moitar bairage preceded the attack. Allied commandeis believed the artillerv concenti ated foi the at- tack south of Kosong had been moved over fiom the central front where for weeks the Communists have hurled tremendous ban ages from massed guns in the see-saw battles for Triangle Hill and Sniper Ridge. Kosong. just inland from the Ja- pan Sea. is a major Communist supply area The eastein fiont flare-up broke a lull that had slowed fighting to a near' standstill along the frozen 155-mile battlefront Sundav. dmlfs Shooting leaping Parents Iter Bad Dream MIAMI, PI a Nov. 9 detectives arrived here to- dav to request custody of a fuzzy- cheeked youth who admitted killing his parents as they slept in their Kearnv. N J home Oct. 23 after he had a "bad dream." S Claus Eischen, held on a federal fugitive warrant after his capture here Saturday, will be brought before the u. S. commissioner tomorrow for a hear- ing' Three New Jersey officers will request his return to Kearny at that time. Meanwhile, no one was permitted to see the mild-mannered, scholarly youth who calmly told police and FBI agents how a long series of family arguments drove him to his mother and father as they slep: early one morning after "a bad dream woke me up." Yes, I am he replied to questions, but young Eischen show- ed no emotion. The boy, looking owlish behind heavy horn-rimmed glasses, said he didn't remember anything for five hours after the shooting, but au- thorities were able to trace his movements today. They said he apparently drove to Newark, N. J., in the family car and sold his most prized possession, a set of drums for S55. He returned home, gathered up some of his mother's jewelry and an arsenal of guns, including a .22 caliber re- volver used in the fatal shooting, and left on the afternoon of the day his paients died. Eischen drove to Newark, Harris- burg, Pa New Orleans and thence to Housion, Tex. Then he headed eastward, picking up a hitchhiker, Robert Barbe, 31, a former Miami taxi driver, in Orange, Tex. The (Turn to.AmnXS Page SLAYING SUSPECT Eischen, 16, sought in connection with the slaying of his parents at Kearny, N. J.. -was arrested in Miami, Fla., for passing a red light. Eichen, center, is shown at police headquarters with Officer J. F. Hartley, left, and Officer K. W Wilson, right, holding pistol found in Eichen's car. Deiroil Banker Picked To Meet Experts >-V fl Bridges Demands Full-Scale Probe Of Kaiser-Frazer Plane Contract All Korea Yanks Want Is Monroe, Rosenberg Says WESTERN FRONT. Korea, Nov. 9 Anna Rosenberg, enetgetic assistant U.S. secretary of defense, said today all the Amer- ican fighting men in Korea want is Maulyn Monroe. "It would be a good idea to have a table of organization with blondes I in she said. She promised to speed the flow of troop reinforcements so front By BETTY PRY OR United Press Staff Correspondent "WASHINGTON. Nov. 9 (UP.) Sen. Styles Bridges oday demanded a full-scale investigation of tne "excessive costs" of an Air Force contract awarded the Kaiser- Frazer Corp. for construction, of C-11S cargo planes. Bridges, ranking Republican on both the Senate Armed Services and Appropriations committees, said a preliminary inquiry showed that Kaiser Frazer has a contract to build 159 C-119's at a cost of each. He recalled that the Fairchild Engine and Aircraft Co. is building the same planes for the government for each. Bridges said the total cost of the Kaizer-Frazer con- tract would be 'nearly S150.000.000 more than if the same contract had been awarded to Fairchild." The senator said he has asked the Senate preparedness subcom- mittee to investigate and is sure that, the Appropriations Committee will look into the case before it appioves next year's appropriations for the Air Force. The Air Force said last month theic was no way to make a fair comparison of the two contracts at! (Turn to BRIDGES. Page 2) All Army Training, Except For Recruits, To Halt For Holidays WASHTNTON, Nov. 9 All Army training, except basic training for draftees and recruits, will be suspended for 16 days over Christmas and New Tear's, the Army announced today. Army Secretary FranK Pace Jr., leave will be granted the "maxi- mum possible number of military personnel." Uusually about half those eligible for leave in that period will take it over the Christmas holiday, the other half over New Year's. All tiaining activities at Army installations will be suspended from Sam. Dec. 20 until Sam. Jan. 5. except for basic training. About 100.000 draftees and new recruits undergoing basic training will continue their program, how- ever, because of "the critical re- requirement for an uninterrupted flow of trained replacements over- seas Springfield Firemen Answer Nine Alarms Springfield fire department was called out nine times over the week- end to fight grass fires, Chief Ellis Mayo said yesterdav He ursed res- idents of-Springfield extreme caution with trash fires during the present dry spell. "Don't Jeave a fire unattended: stay right with it until it is ex- tinguished Mayo said. Sei eral of the grass fires endangered build- ings, he said. HOLLYWOOD. Nov. 9 CUP) Curvaceous Marilyn Monroe faid today the troops in Korea don't think of her anymore than she does of them. "T {hink Mrs. Rosenberg must have been joking." Miss Monroe said, "but anyhow, like all American women, I have the boys in Korea verv much in mind and nould do anything to contribute to their happiness." Ifsw German Diidpline cf BONN. Germany. Nov. 9 West German Defense Secretary Theodor Blank announced today the new German army will w ater down the iron discipline which bound the goose-stepping soldiers of the Kaiser and Hitler. Blank made the announcement m a radio interview in which he called for officers and 80.000 enlisted men to volunteer for ser- vice in the new army. Defense Office sources said last week that 35.000 former officers and enlisted men already have vol- unteered for the new army, which eventually will be expanded to to- tal 500.000 men. In his interview. Blank outlined a number of drastic changes from the old Piussian military .system. First., the goose-stepping parade ground drill will be eliminated In- stead soldiers will be given inten- sive training in the use of weapons in the field. Second, soldiers will be permit- ted to wear civilian clothes off duty. This was never allowed un- der the military systems of Hitler and the Kaiser. Third, soldiers while off dutv will not be reqxnred to .salute anvone but immediate supenois. This is a far crv from the old davs when an enlisted man entering: a civilian restaurant for instance, was re- quired to salute everv officer in the place and ask the hichest- lankine: officer for special permis- sion to eat, there. ime units will get home sooner. Mrs. Rosenberg visited front lines for chats with GI's and Marines as arnlleiy boomed in the distance. She flew over shell-torn Bunker Hill in a helicopter and studied the scene of vicious fighting Satur- day night where Allied infantry- men threw back a sneak attack by Chinese Communists. Then she travelled bv foot and by jeep to front line units to get the "real lowdovvn." "Send us Marilyn a GI shouted. That's all I've had requests for since I got heie." Mrs. Rosenberg said. "It would be a good idea to have a table of organization with blondes in it." One soldier there were several things he didn't like about the Army. "What would you like a blonde9" she quipped Mrs. Howell Dies In Local Hospital Mrs. Belle Ann Howell, 66. Chattahoochee. Fla., died at lO'lO a.m. yesteiday in a local hospital after a brief illness. Funeral ser- vices will be held Tuesday morning at Fust Presbyterian church, Chat- ahoochee. Burial will be in Red Bay cemeteiy. She was stricken Saturday morning visiting a j daughter, Mis Louise Pitts, here. She is survived by her husband, John B Howell. Chattahoochee. two daughters, Mrs Alpha Galhss of Pensacola and Mrs Puts of Panama City, three sons, C N. How-ell of Norfolk. Va Johnnv H of Panama City and David M of St. Peteisburg, three sisters. Mis. T. C. Kenmngton. Mrs. H Q. er and Miss Chiistian McKmnon, i all of Panama City, two biotheis. j L L McKinnon of Chattahoochee City, and 11 grandchildien. Smith Funeral Home is in charge of local airangements. Brother of Two Panama Citians Dies Yesterday Douglas Kelly, divisional mana- eer of Armour Fertilizer works. New Orleans and the brother of Mrs W E Bryant Sr and Mrs. Johnnie K Cheney of Panama CHv died in a New Orleans hospital early Sunday morning, it was learned here last night. Mrs. Cheney and Mis. Biyant, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs W. E. Bryant Jr.. will leave here today to attend graveside services for the deceased brother and un- cle in Huntsville. Ala., at 10 a m. Tuesday. Funeral service will be held in Rams Memorial Methodist church in New Orleans today Survivors, in addition to' the wi- dow, two sisters and nephew in- clude daughtei, Mrs Jack Suther- 1m, New Oi leans one son. Douglas Jr.. El Doindo. Ark, four biotn- cis. Burns. William and New Oilcans, and Walter L. At- lanta, and seven grandsons By MERRIMAN SMITH Uniied Press Staff Correspondent AUGUSTA, Ga.. Nov. 9 (UP) Dwight D. Eisenhower tonight selected Sen. Hemy Cabot Lodge R- Mass. as his chief envoy to the Truman administration. Eisenhower also designated Jos- eph M. Dodge, Detroit banker, to represent him in conferences with the Budget Bureau President Truman had asked the Republican president-elect to name a series of personal representa- tives "immediately'' to come to Washington and confer with tha State and Defense departments, and the Budget Bureau- Eisenhower selected Lodge, re- cently defeated by Rep. John F. Kennedy (D-MassJ for "re-election, to mastermind his liaison work with most of the federal executive establishment. Dodge was selected as the specialist on the 1933-54 budget. Eisenhower's announce m e n t grew out of a late afternoon con- ference with Lodge. Dodge, Sen. Eugene MJlikin Lt. Gen. Lucius D. Clay (ret) and Clifford Roberts, New York investment banker and longtime golf-playing pal of Eisenhower. Eisenhower's decision was dis- closed in a telegram to Mr. Tru- man after two days of telegraphic pressure by the White House to hurry up the designation of Re- publican policy makers who could (Turn to DETROIT, Page 2) McQuagge Charge Gels No Comment From Post Rival i i Gerald Conrad, who was high, man in write-in votes for the coun- ty tax assessor's job in last Tues- day's general election, said Sunday he had no comment to make on charges of H Savely McQuaggs, runnerup in the write-in vote, of irregularities in ballot countrag. Conrad said he will profaabJy have a statement today. He re- i ceived 303 rnoie write-in votes than j H. Savely McQuagge for the offica made vacant by the death of D. G. (Dune) McQuagge, father of K. Savely. McQuagge said the election "does not fairly reflect the will of tha people, and called for a special election to fill the office. Conrad ran against D. G. Mc- Quagge last May's Democratic primary and was barely defeated. Civil Service Board Tightens Regulations On Second Application i WASHINGTON. Nov 9 (UP) j The Civil Service Commission I tightened its lestnctions today on I permitting re-apphcauor.s for post- master and rural mail carrier I vacanc.es. i Until today persons who passed j civil seivice tests and then turned, down appointments nave been al- lowed to re-aoply :or the same vacancy if wished. Hereafter the applicant, mus: show good rea- son for turning down the post before ne can re-apply. The commission said many appli- have refused appointments "apparently oecause of political consiGerations" and then asked for a second chance at tne job. This, the commission said, has required costlv "rerjeaf tect? Tank Line, Link Up ]Lf. Ralph Bennett At Camp Stewart 1 First Lt. Ralph J. Bennett, son of Mr. and Mrs. R. J Bennett, I 1406 Beach Drive. Panama City, j has been assigned to the judge i advocate geneial's section at Camp i Stewart, the nation's second lar- gest military installation. He is a graduate of Bav County High School m Panama Citv and received his bachelor of laws de- gree from John B. Stetson Uni- versity in DeLand. HANOI. Indo-China. Nov. 9 fUP> Fi onch tank units smashed throush Communist lines northwest of Hanoi tonisht and linked up v 
                            

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