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Panama City News Newspaper Archive: November 1, 1952 - Page 1

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   Panama City News (Newspaper) - November 1, 1952, Panama City, Florida                                Go to the Polls On Tuesday, Nov. 4 TELEPHONE 8585 rou 2 Norlhwesl Florida's Most Complete Morning Newspaper NEWS WDLP-AM-FM 590 kc 98.9 me Up-To-Minute News Of World Events TEN PAGES UNITED PRESS (FULL WIRE SERVICE) PANAMA CITY, FLORIDA, SATURDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 1 1959 NEWSPAPER ENTERPRISE ASSOCIATION (COMPLETE SERVICE) TRICKS OR TREATS OX K. G. Auble. 1404 Chorrv St.. starts to fill the assorted baskets and basf of a group of spooks haunting: doorstep last nisrht. The children are, left to right: Henry Ercil, Kay Edmundson, Richard Edmunclson, Smiity Thome, and Jenny Jones for her share In front (Staff Ho For Tonight 3 WASHINGTON, Oct. 31 Hep. John W. Byrnes chaiged today that Secretary of Treasury Joha W. Snjder was mvolied in "highly suspicious activities" m conction with a Holly- wood tax refund case. Snjder retorted that he was "shocked by the accusation which he called "politically-inspired" and "false." He demanded that Rep. Cecil R-.Kong (D Calif, can-man of a House subcommittee mvest- igaung tax scandals, "take action immediately to correct these com- pletely unfounded and n responsible election-ex e statements." blast was contained in a telegram sent fiom Seattle. Wash, "copies of his wire were released by his office here. The Wisconsin Republican said "it seems clear" tins is the "real reason' why the Internal Revenue Bureau has refused to 'turn over certain records on the case to House tax scandal investigators. He called it a crass over-tip attempt Members of the investigating subcommittee blasted the bureau Thuisday for withholding informa- tion. They said Revenue Comm- issioner John B. Dunlap "dishon- ored' a subpena for transcriptions of telephone conversations relating to the refund sought in 1947 by Universal Pictures. Inc. The firm actually received a refund of only Fair Weather Seen For Big Election WASHINGTON. Oct. 31 UP The weather bureau said today the election dav weather outlook is for "prevailingly fair and mild condi- tions" over most of the nation. But it expects chilly weather in the Northern Plains, and scattered showers and normal temperatures In the Pacific Northwest, the lake region and the Ohio Valley. Congressman B Can oil Reece of Tennessee an.xca here this aft- ernoon foi the 8 p m Eisenhower- lor-Pi evident i ally at the court- house. Congiessman Reece spoke Thuis- day night m Clearwsuer, where he also his biother, Asa Reece, foimcr Pnneina City resident. Asa Reece. who was in the garage and upholstenng- business here" a num- ber of aco will accompany his bi other to Panama City. Tomcht's speaker will be the guest of honor at a dinner at the Dixie-Sherman hotel precedmg the lallv The dinner will be attended bv officials and workeis of the Bay Countv Eisenhower for Piesident club, sponsoi of the rally. The current GOP presidential campaign has been cairied on here by the Eisenhov, er club an organi- zation composed of both Demo- crats and Republicans. Rep Reecc reported to be a good speaker. Chairman Oliver W. Brantley said Friday night The was chai-rman of the Republican National Committee from 1946 to 1949. during which the Republican 80th Congiess was elected "Our spcaer has had pro- fessional careers." Brantley added. In addition to bewg a legislator, Congressman Reecc has been a lawyer, educator, banker and pub- lisher. The Recces will stnv at the Dixie- Sheiman hotel while in Panama City. 3JMI, A Bay Harbor man charged with attacking- a deputy constable was released here yesterday under 800 bond and another jailed in con- nection with the same case. Released -was Ronald Chason. charged with max hem on Deputy Constable Buddy McLemore when the constable attempted to arrest him Wednesday on drunken driving charges. Constable Ira Boyd last night charged Chester Fowhand, Spring- field, with "failing to assist" Mc- Le" e "in an emergency." 3ox cl said Fowhand had observed the attack bv Chason and a third man Alto Anderson, on the deputy without offering to give assistance. Anderson was arrested the night of the attact and later released. I'm going to break this stuff Boyd said. "I'm going to ar- man I hear say he saw the fight and did not offer aid to McLemore." About a quarter of one of Mc- ear was cut off the scuffle. Boxd said last night the deputy "is still having quite a bit of pain' and is under a doctor's care. DAY Schedules Marianne Confab PRICE FIVE CENTS Ervin OK's Office Use For Politics TALLAHASSEE, Oct. 31 CUP' Atty. Gen. Richaid W. con- firmed today thai equipment and employes of his office were used to piocess some Demociatic cam- paign literature. First repoits of the campaign activity in the Democratic attorney j I general's office came from Repub- i hcans here. j Ervin." leached in Gainesville 1 wheie he is attending unrveisity of Flos ;da homecoming cereaicmes. said the v.oik did not cost the slate i a penny and he did not belioi e the i small amount of time" spent by employes in m'meocjrrph- in? political mateiial was an he: disclosure unon arriVaThere'by es Repulse Chinese Assault Early Today enera! tit f !s Wife Ha! She Ike Letter LOS ANGELES. Oct. 31 The v, ife 01 Gen. James A. Van Fleet disclosed toda1, she turned to Dv.ight D. Eisenhower a copv of a letter her husband sent Koiea at the icquest of the Republican pi esidential nominee. Mi p. Maigaiet Van Fleet made Election Highlights CHICAGO, Oct. 31 j NEW YORK, Oct. 31 (UP; D. Eisenhower, before a yelling, Adlai E Stevenson closed his sign-waving crowd of per- Seaboard campaign to- Enemy Threatens Mushroom Tactics Big Fran! f By ROBERT VERMILLIO.V crowd that his Repuoh- United Press Staff Correspondent sons in Chicago Stadium, tonight i ridiculed Gov. Adlai E. Stevenson can foes "could offer "the" "nation TOKYO Nov 1   _ as a "protege" of Piesident Tru- only "opposition, obstructionism I United Nations' soldiers pussy I and stubborn negation.' He spok" in the historic Academy of Music where in years gone by and such Democratic presidential can- Stevenson his ''Siamese-twin oppo-{ didates as Franklin D. Roosevelt, man and an exponent of footing foreign polic> He called Mr. Truman abuse" of nents" and predicted that with the "It is well known that I am ac- wnen E.senhower telephoned her lively suDporung the Democratic i requesting use of the letter Van said Fj.jet had written to Gen Orlando He said the Democratic commit- i c- he told her, "I wouldn't tee of Florida is paying for the tt ant to nun Van sten' pid paper used m lunmng off the campaign literature and only a small amount of time was Al Smith, and tram fro mthe East. She said that assistance Oj the Amencan ele- to7_ delivered key "Friday before elec- ate, he would on election day lead j uon" addresses. back a Chinese assault on Jane Russell Peak early today, sealino- up a Communist penetration that tnreater.ed to mushroom into cap- ture of the entire Triangle Hill mass on the west-central front. L- -alion of 750 Chinese troops drove a wedge into U.N. positions the nation out of "seven years oil Brooklyn Democrats opened their i on Jano Pus- heaits. Police could estimate FriT" The Fair Deal misiule." The sprishtly-looking general's I devoted to the work by his em- j ployes. j He said his secretary, Mrs. Lillian Ryder, was reouested bv wife then added that her husband "wouldnt mind being hurt if it would help him She explained that her husband sent her a copy of his lettei to Gen. in which he claimed he had The Chicago Stadium has a capacity of about 21.000 persons, but there weie tiers of empty seats behind the Republican nominee as he spoke. Eisenhower's reception before estimate streets only in terms of "tens of and it was a cheering, roaring crowd which gave him a five-minute ova- tion in the hall. He charged Dwight D Eisen- hower with waging a campaign 3-30 -rooos Friday captured Red i a. the stadium audience was one of j battle of -systematic attack" on the warmest of his Democratic headouaners here to been unaole to get approval for Hls speech was ipf. rhp use of South Korean trooos almost every point by c 51.000-mile foreign pohcv which has brought in WoorfT ras broken TTmtXi -to nf C_ose.d m blood-v han save the organization some S100 printing costs. 13 Persons Dead As Blaze Nursing HILLSBORO, Mo Oct 31 (UP) fire tonight swept through a three-story nursing home here, and the civil defense director for the area said 18 persons were burned to death. A H. Hoffman, civilian defense director, set the death figure and said that about 21 persons were injured. James Lewis, manager of the institution, the Cedar Grove Nurs- ing Home, said the fire broke out about 6 p.m. in a breezeway next to the masonry building-. He said workmen had been installing a new heating system and thought that crossed wires might have touched off the blaze. An early report from police that a forest fire had ignited the build- ing proved false. let the attorney geneiai's mimeo- graph machine be used m order to because he was too busy to write 'hei. He said in a note, she ex- plained, that he hoped the enclo- suies would interest her. Mis. Van Fleet said she received the letter about Oct. 23 and Eisen- hower leleased its contents with her pei mission Oct. 29. In disclosing how word of the letter reached Eisenhower, Mrs. Van Fleet explained that she had told her daughter. Betty, about it. She in nun told Eisenhower s daughter- in-law, and subsequently word of its existence reached Eisenhower's campaign group. and shouting applause the United States point by clapping i world respect." 'to a n of Republicans, he said, have There were thundering boos when I "fallen back on the parrot-like fatlonal Peanut "estiva! Starts In Bothan Today DCTHAN. Nov. 1 (Special) National Peanut Festival officially gets underway at 11 a. m. this morning with a parade featuring several out of town bands and floats Simultaneously, the carni- val will open at Wiregrass Me- Blonde Inspiration For Theft Drops From Sight HOLLYWOOD. Oct. 31 _00 Pretty Jill Follmgsworth. 17. whose as'ivilss "Panama" morial Stadium. The Bay High School band will be among those in the parade. The Panama City musicians are sched- uled to arm e by special train along with a goup of citizens fom that citv The Panama City float sponsored by Panama City Chamber of Com- merce will feature Miss Jean Biggs he referred to the Truman admin- istration, and a deafening blast of approval when he taunted the Democrats for having to fire a party official for being involved in a whopping "five per center" deal. repetition" of false charges about America's stand in world affairs. "As soon as the general took off his uniform." Stevenson said, "he changed his tune" from one of urging a stronger national defense to advocacy of major budget cuts. Rioting Cons Set Ohio Pen Afire By LARRY MURPHY United Press Staff Correspondent COLUMBUS, O., Oct. 31 than shouting prisoners rioted and set fire to the Ohio state penitentiary in midtown Columbus tonight. The Columbus, O prison not Friday was the eighth major out- break in the nation's prisons this year. The first serious riot occurred March 30 when 50 inmates at Tren- Early this morning all but a few of the recalcitrant prisoners had been sent back to their cells by a force of 300 guards and state patrol reinforcements, ac- cording to the United Press. get a start on a film career, dropped out of sight today. a 3 p. m. show at Wiregrass Sta- dium bv Al St. John and Cecil I Campbell and his Tennessee Ram- i_i i iiio -tx-iUll- The blonde young actress did not j bleis. Also at the stadium will be occupy her apartment Thursday a band show and float awards be- night and her landlady declined to gmnmg at The Al St. John show is scheduled to repeat at Placing for the Queen's Ball at 9 p. m. will be Freddy Shaffer and his all-girl orchestra. say -where the girl had gone. Miss Hollmgsv-. orth was left sob- bing by the news that her mother, Mrs. Beatrice Hollmgsworth. 47 had admitted the embezzlements to help her caieer. The possibility existed that Miss Hollingsworth may have gone to Detroit to help her mother. The girl said Thursday when informed of her mother's arrest. "I want to go home to help her." Tyndcdl to Open Two-Week Gunnery Training Course Mere than 40 Air Force students today begin a new two week fighter gunnery training couise at Tyndall Air Force Base. Public information oHtceip said the training has been added to the present six week mteiceptor course. All F 94B and F "89C students will be given the training. The course will consist of skeet firing, 15 hours of academics and 10 hours of flight training. Maj. Earl L. Basnan. proiect officer. Cloudy Bui Mild In Panama Today Skies will be partly cloudy today over Panama City but mild temper- atures will hold. U. S. Weathermen predict gentle llsyit, fiiGSjtJ'frGiy Some prosiess was reportedlv I noted xesteid.iv in the condition of I Mis. A. Campbell. Port St. Joe. j who was flown aboard a special Air Force plane to Atlanta earlier this week when she became criti- cally '11. According to information re- ceived here by relatives. Mts. Campbell "has shown imnrove- ment" "since an operation Thurs- day night "but is till in critical condition j Mrs Campbell is sifter to Mrs. Karl Wisclosrel, 117 S. MacArthur Ave.. and. Mis. E. R. Spiva, 1005 Meeting of llth District Disabled j American Veterans opens tornoc-- sald- Flight training will be broken row at noon m Marianna. Veterans from Panama City and other North Florida cities will attend. Speakers include D. C. Suggs. Citv, past state command- c oigamzation. down into camera gunnery, air to- air gunnery, air to ground gun- nery and fighter tactics. A staff of 24 officers and seven airmen will serve in the I section. Fauld Hot Hospi To Chiropractors Florida Attorney General Rich- ard Ervin said late yesterday in Tallahassee that the proposed hos- pital act would not permit chiro- practors to practice in Bay County Memoiial hospital. In an opinion given Dr. Philip Coker, local osteopathic physician, Etvm said that "since chiropract- 01 s haxe not been admitted to the general practice of medicine or surgeiy under state law, the spe- cial act will not permit them to practice in the county The act. chapter 27396 on the Nov. 4 ballot, would broaden word- ing in existing laws governing ad- mission to the hospital staff to per- mit doctors other than medical doc- tors to practice there Some opponents of the bill have charged that "chiiopractors. faith healers" to practice at the institution. it would permit naturopaths, and ton. N. J., state prison seized four hoowges and staged a three day riot. On April 15, a second riot oc- curred at that prison when 54 con- victs ban leaded themselves m the prison print shop and held four hostages during a three-day re- bellion. On April 17, 231 convicts at Rah- way, N. J., state prison farm seized i held the crest of Triangle Hm in 19 of bit-er fighting attacked Jane Russell hill today behind a ainllery and mortar barrage United Press War Correspondent; Victor Kendnck recorted from the front that the penetration had been closed in bloody hand-to-hand fight- ing that still raged at last reports. Kendnck reported that the weather cleared early today, per- mitting Allied warplanes to rake Chinese positions with bombs, bul- lets ---i rockets. Jane Russell Peak is a ridge that commands approaches to the crest of Triangle Hill. Red artillery and mortars pun- ished Triangle with a round barrage during the 24-hour period ending at 6 a.m. today. Fighting on the mam part of Triangle Hill dwindled during the night after South Korean infantry- men who had earlier refused to retreat broke off efforts to recap- ture the strategic peak north of Kumhwa guarding the route to Seoul. An American officer said only the "utmost heroism" of the South Korean troops on Triangle Hill Friday had prevented a Chinese attack from striking- the main U.N. line and endangering the vital Kumhwa supply junction. Pickup 4th pg-h: The ROK from the Tienton prison and, fail- ing, turned the attempt into a riot. Twelve of 13 prisoners joined them and two were injured when hit by richocheting machine gun bullets. The convicts set seven fires in- side the walls of the prison, scene of a disastrous Easter Mondav fire in 1930 when 322 men and also where O. Henry wrote many of his famous short stories while an inmate. "The fires are burning out of, ,___ ___ Warden Ralph W. Alvis scheduled for a decrease today, said "We have also lost control accoidmg to State Treasurer and 1 Insurance Commissioner J. Edwin Larson, Larson said the "adjustment is State Insurance Bates Scheduled To Decline Today Florida fife insurance rates were of the inmates.' A guard said the riot, began at about 4.55 p.m. which in the dining room, was touched off by the prisoners' complaints that beans were being served too often. Arvis and Highway Patrol Supt George Mingle issued repeated pleas to the rioting inmates to return to their cell' Their appeals eight hostages and went on a ramp- were ignored. age lasting 113 hours. All. these up- j Mingle said he h ordered the risings fizzled when authorities re- use of "heavy artillery" to try fused to give the prisoners food. to quell the uprism- He did not On April 20, 400 Jackson, Mich., I elaborate but this interpreted 'as meaning the pa'.olmen would use riot guns if necessary. Alvis pleaded on a loudspeaker for the men to return to their cells Then he announced: "It (quelling of the mob) will have to be done by force." The uprising came at the height of the evening rush hour and thousands of automobiles were snarled in traffic jams as police cars rushed to the scene. A down- town Halloween parade was can- celled because of the disturbance. A prison guard said a new diet- was transferred to he ,f.ro.m the London Prlson farm and that prisoners had com- plained the food was "Dad" this week They also complained of slow mail deliveries and slow pro- cessing of paroles by the Ohio Flames blazed in the dining hall, woolen mill, paint shop, the chapel, a storeroom, the courtyard and commissary and could be seen brightly licking over the walls dur- ing the night. state prison convicts seized 11 guards as hostages and took over control of cellblock 15, causing in damages. The four-day disturbance subsided after the reb- els were promised a "steak and ice cream dinner. Warden Julius Frisbee and his deputy, Vernon Fox, were later fired. On June 4, an uprising was Staged by inmates of Central Pris- on, in Raleigh, N. C. They seized three guards and seven civilian prison xvorkers and kept them as hostages for six hours before piis- Capt.. W. G. Meadows for "biutali- T1 next serious prison outbreak occurred at the Concord, Mass., re- formator July 2 when 38 prisoners rioted over ,ousy food" and "bru- tality." The inmates held two guards as hostages for four hours On Julv 22. 43 convicts at the 149-year-old Massachusetts state prison in Charleston held three guards hostage for 15 hours. The Massachusetts riots resulted in cor- rections Commissioner Maxwell B. Grossman's promising to investi- gate prison conditions. New Jersey was the scene of an- other serious outbreak Oct. 12 when seven prisoners tried to escape ic Haymaker Curtain the result of a year's study of fire insurance rates by the insurance department with the cooperation of the Florida Inspection and Rating Bureau." He estimated the new rates will effect a net savings of for Florida policyholders. The insurance commissioner said the new cut will bring to the total annual savings made dur- ing the past five years by policv- holders in this state Classes affected oy the adjust- ment are: apartment houses, banks and offices, b lilder's risks, chur- ches, dwellings, garages, hospitals, hotels, lumber yards at saw planing mills, mercantiles. public pioperties, schools and sprmklered non manufacturing risks. Gridder Injured Here Last Night A Fernandma Beach High school football player was injured here last night in the third period of that school's game with Bav Hash school. Condition of the player, Harvev Loftin, Fernandma Quarterback, couid not be learned last night. But attendents at Adam's hospital said x-rays were being made Loftin was injured when tackled by a player on the opposing- squad. Trygve Lie Boots Americans From Their United Bv .TOSEFH TV. GRIGG manding general of She Fifth Air l.-borers, are ihmg in huge camp f the Nouasseur base. RABAT. Frencn Morocco, Oct. 31 j Grace Ave.. Panama City. Both United States atom-bombers Wiselogel and Mrs. Spiva are could take off from three vast new now in Atlanta. Mrs. Campbell was sped to At- lanta Wednesday aboa-d a Tyndall American air bases Morocco and wittun six hours de- liver smashing blows at Iron Cur- Field mercy plane when she be-' tain targets if war broke out came seriously ill after she had swallowed a chicken bone. Port St. Joe physicians said only tomorrow. with headquarters Construction of the five Moroc- can bases for the U. S Air Force French was authorised by Congress soon after the outbreak of the Korean j war. The cost of the program j originally was estimated at I The three bases, around which a fierce congressional fight burst last v f, to moderate variable winds for the area during Saturday. TIDES TODAY: High. p.m.: low. SUNDAY: High. pm: low, a.m. Apalachicola river reading at Chatlahoochee: .57 feet, special treatment couid save her summer, already are functioning and ready to deliver a Sunday punch ?t nnv time. Two more will be sufficiently far advanced to handle strategic, jet bombers and fighters a year from now, Air Force authorities here said. "All five bases will be fully MIRACULOUS ESCAl'E Miss.. Oct. SI David injured today run over by a earth moviiiR machine as he worked on a new runway extension for operational within a year." a party planes at Key Field here. of visiting correspondents was Wylie was lying in a sand bed. 1 by Maj. Gen. Archie Old, Jr. (W. French and native Moroccan S300.000.000 but is now expected to exceed S500.000.000. started in April, 1951, and by mid-September this year three of the five scheduled bases were able to handle any kind of aircraft. The three bases operating are immense projects ranging up to acres in area, scooped out of the brown, arid soil of Morocco Most advanced of the three bases already operational is Sidi Slimane. about 22 miles east of the U. S. Navy's super-secret base at Port Lyautey. Work, which began at Sidi Sh- mane April 22. 1951, is now 85 per cent completed. At Nouasseur. 15 miles southeast of Casablanca, U. S. Engineers are pushing completion of what will be the Air Force's biggest ftrategic supply base in the Eastern Hem- isohere. Old estimated that work is about 50 per cent completed. "We are readv to take at a UNITED NATIONS, N.Y., Oct. 31 Secretarv General Trjgie Lie has dismissed from his United Nations staff three Americans who refused to testify investigators probing possible Communist activities among Amer- ican U N. employes, a U N. announced tonight. Byron Price, assistant secretary general for U N. administration. The third of i sald Lie flred the three Lakelcmder Held For Threatening .SsTbfe! Governor Warren a 17 000 prro 7 project that lies on the barren 'rcnl the Secretariat last nf ine m Ol deVt of southed Moroc He said they were s or bare desert. Some U. S. moment's notice any type of plane airmen and American civilian I now in existence or" planned." said construction workers, aided by Brig. Gen Wilfred H. Hardy of Lewiston, Me., commanding gen- co. It is the least advanced of the onlv about 27 per rent com- plete. Old its two runways also are readv and tested to take the heaviest jet bombe-? Two other bases are still only on the drawing boards, but officials said their runways will be com- pleted and fields operational by this time next year. The only U. S. tactical units in Morocco at the moment are a wins of B-29 heavy bombers and a wing of F-84 Thunder Jot fighters which have been .it Glrti Sl'mane for the past three weeks on a routine training basis. TAMPA. Oct. 31 A year-old Lakeland. Fla man rhars-ed todr.v sending -hreat- letters :o Gov" W-rrcn H. was held m ;a.I fi.hn to post me 51 000 b- U S Com r.v_: Accordins: to tes- _. srr.itn sent ?n noscene letter :n wr to kill Warren, in the best interests of the Nations." Price ider.t-f.ed the staff mem- bers as Alfred J. Van Tassel, chief--------------------- of the U N. econom.c section of the J Crewmen special projects division: Herbert A _ _ fj J Schmimel, ar. officer of the depart-' bupsrfort falls ment of economic affairs, and' Sfof m-Tossecf Sea Herman Zap. a fellow shop officer of the technical assistance admin- istration. The three were in American emploves OKINAWA. Sat Nov. 1 An 3-29 Stiperfort re- group of 10 to r- Okinawa "case from the U.N. a bombins: raid in North Korea who were given compulsory leave I crash-landed _ :n the storm-tossed cf absence with pa- after they' refused to testify Oct. 22 before the Senate Internal Security Com- mittee. i Ens" China sea earlv Today. Rescue craft picked three crew- men out of trie waves. Elevec other were   

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