Bonita Daily News, September 30, 1970

Bonita Daily News

September 30, 1970

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Issue date: Wednesday, September 30, 1970

Pages available: 20

Previous edition: Tuesday, September 29, 1970

Next edition: Thursday, October 1, 1970

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Bonita Daily News (Newspaper) - September 30, 1970, Naples, Florida 3ANAHIS DAILY NEWS Wad., Sept. 30, 1970 State Races’Crime Fighter' Shevin Rolls Over Friday MIAMI (AP) - state Sen. Bob Shevin rode an urban \-oting wave to the DeinocraUc nomination for Ftorida attorney general and now goes head-to-head with a e-foot-6, 280-pound Republican. The 36-year-old Miamian led in only 15 of Florida’s 67 counties but walloped State Sen. Elmer Friday of Fort Myers soundly in big cities to win easily. Shevin rolled up better than 13-1 edge in his populous home county of Dade and carried other giants such as Pinellas, Duval, Broward, Hillsborough and Orange. The final unofficial vote count was 367,921 for Shevin, more than 54 per cent statewide, to Friday’s 311,051. Shevin, an avowed crime fighter who promises to cut law breaking as attorney general or quit, will meet unopposed GOP candidate E. Thom Rumberger. The massive Republican, who earned college tuition by milking rattlesnakes, is a former circuit court Judge from Melbourne. In another state race Tuesday, Rep. Bill Bevis of Fort Meade took the Democratic nomination for the Public Service Commission. He trounced former assistant atomey general Wilson Wright of Tallahassee and meets Republican Rep. David Lindsey of Orlando in the Nov. 3 general election. Wright, who led in six counties during a five-man first primary fight, won Just three counties against Bevis. ITie winner polled 332,092 votes, more than 56 per cent, to Wright’s 257,296. “I seldom read horoscopes, but mine was a beauty for Tuesday,” said Shevin, whose father died from wounds in a Miami holdup 17 years ago. *‘It said under the Capricorn section that ‘others will concede to you. You will win.’” Shevin said he was “delighted at the tremendous percentages in Broward and Dade counties.” He credited a hunger for “new, fresh faces in high government of Florida” as a major factor in his victory over Friday, a 46-year-old former Oklahoma University football player. Special thanks were handed to Democratic U.S. Senate nominee Lawton Chiles by Shevin, who said “his campaign helped focus the need for new, fresh blood.” Contacted in Melbourne, the 38-year-old Rumberger said the runoff balloting indicated “once again a majority of Democrats has rejected a sound, conservative candidate such as Sen. Ekner Friday.” Rumberger branded Shevin “an ultraliberal who has campaigned in right wing clothing.” The former Judge served 1958-61 as the first attorney general of the University of Florida Honor Court while working on the side at Ross Allen’s reptile farm in Ocala. Shevin had led a three-man field during the Sept. 8 first prima^, 229,380 votes to 2i4,in lor FViday. Bill Meadows lost out with 157,640 votes and much of that Miami man’s support appeared to swing to Shevin. Bevis, a one-time University of Tennessee football captain, also repeated his first primary triumph. He led easily with 164,077 votes the first time around while Wright had to await a recount 48 hours after the polls closed to gain his runoff position. Wright wound up with 107,596 votes to Dominic Koo’s 106,944. During the campaign, Wright had accused Bevis of “trying to get by solely on family connections and a last-minute media barrage. He thinks by filling the airwaves he can confuse the voters of Florida.” Second primary action was relatively light in state races, but a full-scale shootout was forecast for the general election. The other matches include: COMPTROLLER - In-cumbent Democrat Fred 0. LAWTON CHILES REUBIN ASKEW WILLIAM BEVIS CLAUDE KIRK 3 Incumbents Lose In Voting 2nd Black Elected To House Some Of The Mfimers Aren't Happy Either Losers aren’t the only candidates unhappy aftv Tuesday’s runoff primary. Some winners seemed upset because they would have to face opponents they had hoped to avoid in the November general election. Lawton Chiles’ smashing victory over former Gov. Farris Bryant in the Democratic U.S. Senate runoff didn’t raise any cheers in the camp of Republican U.S. Rep. William Cramer, R-Fla., who won his party’s senatorial nomination in the first primary. “I’ll admit this isn’t what we had hoped for,” a Cramer aide said after it became obvious the young state senator from Lakeland had achieved a 2-1 victory over Bryant. “He’s riding a wave, and you can’t pin him down on flie issues,” the Cramer aide sakL “That walk brought Chiles a lot of attention, but it’s not s<nnething you could can controversial.” He referred to a 1,000 mile walk the 40-year-old Chiles matte from Pensacola to the Florida Keys in his first primary campaign. Chiles daimed he met 40,000 people on flie walk, and said he planned to keep hoofing it around Florida in an effort to ride Shank’s Mare to Washington. Bryant, too, had ridiculed the walk before his defeat.' E. Thom Rumberger, Republican candidate for attorney general, mbde no bones about his displeasure over the runoff victmy of Democrat Robert Shevbi of Miami. Rumberger, a 6-foot-6,280-pound former Melbourne circuit Judge, said that in nominating the 36-year-old Miamian the Democrats had “rejected a sound, conservative candidate, State Sen. Elmer Friday, and selected an ultra-liberal who has been campaigning in right-wing clothing.” Gov. Claude Kirk won renomination easily over Republican opponent Jack Eckerd. Kirk maintained his usual indifference when asked if he was happy that State Sen. Reubin Askew had beaten Atty. Gen. Earl Faircloth in the Democratic runoff. “I never really thought about it,” Kirk said. But campaign staffers at Kirk’s Fort Lauderdale headquarters were obviously surprised by the 41-year-old Askew’s victory and were none too happy about it. “I thought Faircloth would nail him,” said Kirk’s campaign Manager, Robert E. Lee as he watched the returns come in on television. “Well, they both have their weaknesses,” he said in a way that made it clear he preferred Faircloth’s weaknesses to Askew’s. By'RICH OPPEL Associated Press Writer TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Florida voters Tuesday elected two new state senators, ousted three of five incumbent House members, and sent a second black legislator to the House. There were these key results in the 21 legislative races on the runoff election ballot: <- Pensacola businessman W. D. Childers and State Rep. Gerald A. Lewis of Miami, both Democrats, were elected to the state Senate. They face no opposition in November. —Incumbent Reps. John Robert Middlemas, D-Panama City, Clifford McNulty, R-Melboume, and William G. Roberts, D-Key West, were ousted by voters. —Gwendolyn S. Cherry, a Negro lawyer, was elected by Dade County voters to sit in the House. The Miami Democrat faces no Republican opposition. Childers defeated former State Rep. Gordon Wells of Pensacola to capture the Senate seat given up by Reubin Askew. Childers attacked Wells’ record as a beer industry lobbyist during the last session of the Legislature. Rep. Lewis defeated former Rep. Mary Ann MacKenzie of Key Biscayne for the seat abdicated by Robert L. Shevin. For years Lewis has been a severe critic of Insurance Commissioner Broward Williams —defeated Sept. 8 — and the California plan of auto insurance rating which only recently has come under attack from other politicians. Rep. Middlemas, an ar- Statewide Vote By County eovtrnor-Rcpiibncan U.S. Stnatt-Dtmocratic •y THE ASSOCIATED Tefal Pets PRESS By THE ASSOCIATED Total Pets PRESS Pet* In Eekard Kirk Peti In Bryant Chilar 34 34 1,301 1,1«5 Alachua 34 34 2,409 S«8 11,202 Baker 7 7 1 8 Baker 7 7 1,029 8,054 Bay 34 34 28« 420 Bay 34 34 4,3«1 Bradford 17 17 30 60 Bradford 17 17 1,234 2,060 9,737 Brevard 7« 76 6,871 8,998 Brevard 7« 7« 7,811 14,845 Broward »0 220 23,38« 27,947 Broward 220 220 21,959 1,140 Calt'-oun 13 13 « 22 Calhoun 13 13 «59 Charlotte 22 22 1,832 1,459 Charlotte 22 22 850 1,863 2,280 C ^^ru» 19 19 502 692 Citrus 19 19 1,208 12 12 255 518 Clay 12 12 1,295 2,140 'li, er 1» 19 1,822 1,249 Collier 19 19 1,208 1,343 '.’y-j'r.txa 1» 19 78 217 Columbia 19 19 1,385 3,189 net 3i0 340 14,632 15,610 Dade 340 340 37,787 85,312 i'j^o 15 15 41 54 DeSoto 15 15 503 1,099 1,002 ti t 12 12 0 2 Dixie 12 12 81« Gj/S? 1*0 190 2,650 7,492 Duval 190 190 29,138 40,945 Etcmsii« 103 103 1,473 1,109 Escmbia 103 103 12,969 22,855 Piat'frf 8 • 16 48 Fiaoier 8 8 318 550 P rar»» Ijfi 7 7 21 47 Franklin 7 7 633 872 OadvOen 12 12 20 88 Gadsden 12 12 1,596 2,758 S-iChr.»J 9 9 3 0 Gilchrist 9 9 467 732 Oiadet 1 1 6 1 Glades 8 8 245 404 11 11 5 10 Gulf 11 n 947 1,908 )!fon 11 11 3 11 Ham ilton 11 11 352 630 Marae* 11 11 25 59 Hardee 11 11 447 1,427 Hendry * 9 34 42 Hendry 9 9 602 B96 Merr»a«do 14 14 424 415 Hernando 14 14 652 1,365 Mishiawdt 15 15 599 687 Highlands 15 15 780 2,807 10» 10» 5,937 7,067 Hillsbh 109 109 14,090 39,479 HOfiTi*» 23 23 7 15 Holmes 23 23 885 1,719 ïr'dian Rivr 17 17 1,055 1,370 Indian Rivr 17 17 1,203 1,686 j»c*u»n 32 32 50 99 Jackson 32 32 2,104 2,859 II 11 16 64 Jefferson 11 11 461 967 ¡.•f /•»»# 5 5 1 7 Lafayette 5 5 437 675 42 42 520 4,184 Lake 42 42 3,097 2,724 L** SI SI 3,519 936 3,385 Lee 58 58 2,965 4,801 LfKii-- 25 25 2,505 Leon 25 25 4,324 10,812 / 14 14 26 92 Levy 14 14 493 1,490 L 7 7 1 1« Liberty 7 7 443 651 W»« »on 15 15 11 51 Madison 15 15 953 1,825 3» 39 3,73« 4,601 1,405 AAanatee 39 39 2,425 6,035 f/.trturt 35 35 375 Marlon 35 35 3,160 4,377 «art.r» 17 17 «75 1,167 Martin 17 17 1,142 1,504 23 23 387 382 Monroe 23 23 3,118 3,465 Mattai 12 12 2« 108 Nassau 12 12 1,050 1,321 Oka tosta 30 30 334 360 Okaloosa 30 30 3,014 6,398 Ot'tr.hob«« t « 53 73 Okechobet « « 388 «31 ÌU 11« 3,08« 20,063 Orange 11« 11« 13,64« 1,0«3 11,8«9 O»ceota 14 15 153 1,597 Osceola 15 15 1,093 Ptlrrt Ben 124 124 11,012 15,51« Palm Beh 124 134 8,S3S 31,010 Patco 34 34 3,013 3,180 Pasco 34 34 1,811 5,271 Pinaiiat 220 220 40,713 31,548 Pinellas 330 320 13,«53 39,391 P*lk fi 91 2,154 4,537 Polk 91 91 5,431 33,704 P>wtnam 27 27 119 421 Putnam 27 27 1,«7* 3,513 ft, j»hnt 20 20 227 515 St. Johns 20 20 1,184 1,73« 3,530 it. Luci» 11 11 894 1,451 St. Lucie 1i 18 4.048 fant« Ko»a 33 23 229 171 Santa Rosa 23 23 3,507 4,7«S i»rê§otê 41 41 9,153 8,594 4,602 Sarasota 41 41 3,541 3,833 »•mfnoia 37 37 77« Sam InQlt 37 37 3,341 3,731 fwmfar 13 12 23 103 Sumter 12 12 75« *99 Swwannta 33 23 18 42 Suwannee 23 23 873 3,538 Taylor 1f 19 10 90 Taylor 19 19 1,135 1,7«3 Un ton 7 7 4 5 Union 7 7 197 538 Voluti* 17 •7 3,7«5 7,891 Volusia 87 87 «,83« 14,004 Wèkull» * * 5 33 Wakulla 9 9 4«4 73« Waiton 33 33 40 «3 Walton 33 33 1,S31 3,370 Washtnatn 14 14 20 «1 Washlngtn 14 14 1,017 1,538 dent conservationist, was beaten by WiUiam J. Rish, a Port St. Joe attorney. “The two big issues,” Middlemas reflected early today, “were the pay raise and my vote against the prayer-in-school resolution.” Middlemas voted in 1969 to override Gov. Claude Kirk’s veto of the |12,000«-year salary which lawmakers had voted themselves. He also voted against another legislator’s resolution asking Congress to call a constitutional convention to restore prayer in public schools. McNulty, who also voted for the pay raise, was upset by Merritt Island public relations agent Jane W. Robinson, a former newspaperwoman. Roberts, an insurance agent who unseated Florida Keys power Bemie Papy in a 1968 House race, was ousted by Tavemier attmney Fred Tittle. Mrs. Cherry will become only the second black person in modem history to sit in the Florida Legislature. There now will be two; the other being Rep. Joe Lang Kershaw, D-Miami, who was elected in 1968 and reelected in the Sept. 8 first primary. Mrs. Cherry won over former North Bay Village Mayor Harvey Ruvin. There were two Senate races in addition to those won by Childers and Lewis. State Rep. Bob Brannen of Lakeland defeated former Lakeland mayor George W. Trask in a bitter contest for the Democratic nomination to Lawton Chiles’ seat. Brannen faces a Republican opponent in the general election. A battle between former State Atty. Tom Johnson ol Riviera Beach and former West Palm Beach mayor Reid Moore for the GOP nomination to Elmer Tim Adams, a Negro who owns an Orlando restaurant, was defeated by white housewife Margaret C. Murray for the Democratic nomination to House seat 39 in Orange County. Two allies of Gov. Kirk defeated two candidates identified with U.S.. Rep. WilUiuTi C. Cramer, ttiè GOP U.S. Senate nominee long regarded Kirk. as an enemy of Donald R. Crane of St Petersburg whipped Kenneth L Wicks for the GOP nomination in House seat 52, and Eugene C. Mooney of Orlando outpolled Paula F. Hawkins of Maitland for the party nomination for House seat 38. Chiles Ready To Walk Again MIAMI (AP)-Lawton Qiiles, who won the Democratic U.S. Senate race in a walk, prepared today to take to the road again for his general election showdown ^th the Republican nominee, Rep. Bill Cramer. “I can’t wait,” said a Jubilant Chiles after a smashing, 2-to-l upset victory over former Gov. Farris Bryant in the Democratic battle for the seat of retiring Sen. Spessard L Holland. “I’m ready to start tonight.” As Chiles piled up a commanding lead in the first returns from Tuesday’s runoff primary, Holland was on the phone early in the evening, offering congratulations and support in the general election. “Cramer can bring in President Nixon, Vice President Agnew, Gov. Ronald Reagan, and anybody else he wants to bring in,” ChUes said. “I’U take Holland on my side against all of them.” Cramer, who won easy Republican nomination over former Judge Harrold Carswell in the first primary, was surprised at the strength demonstrated by Chiles in his sweep past the veteran Bryant. But he expressed confidence in his own chances. “Each Democrat said the other couldn’t beat me,” said Cramer. “I agree with both of them.” And Cramer quickly set the tone of the campaign he will wage against the “walking senator.” Swamp Buggy Races Oovtrnor-Dtmocratic By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Total Pel* pei$ M At^ktw Fa^ireih Friday’s old Senate seat was nearly a dead heat. Johnson led Moore by 184 votes with all machine results in, but 878 absentee ballots remaining to be counted. In other House races. Rep. Joe Chapman, D-Panama City, won reelectim by a narrow margin over schoolteacher Wayne A. Brown. The only other incumbent in the election, Rep. Walter W. Sackett Jr., D-Miami, a physician, easily defeated Pat L. Tomillo Jr., longtime executive secretary of the Dade County Classroom Teachers Association. There were two blacks seeking House seats besides Mrs. Cherry, and both lost. Arentt Girardeau, a Jacksonville dentist, lost to former Rep. Joseph Ken-nelly Jr., a Democrat, in a Duval County contest. Girardeau said he was wrongfully accused of being a “black militant” KenneUy faces no further opposition. Alachua 34 34 9,538 4,333 Baker 7 7 7«1 9«1 Bay 34 34 «,24« 1,49« 7,598 Bradford 17 17 1,«53 Brevard 7« 7« 12,«59 18,49« «,0«4 30,673 Broward 220 220 Calhoun 13 13 1,347 648 Charlotte 22 22 1,58« 1,431 Citrus 19 19 1,988 1,624 Clay 12 12 1,891 1,770 1,505 Collier 19 19 1,213 Columbia 19 19 1,839 2,711 71,540 Dade 340 340 70,787 DeSoto 15 15 982 746 Dixie 12 12 612 1,223 Duval 190 190 34,491 36,837 Escmbia 103 103 33,670 5,141 Flagler 8 8 593 370 Franklin 7 7 888 859 Gadsden 12 12 2,686 1,624 Gilchrist 9 9 364 813 Glades 8 8 345 219 Gulf 11 11 1,387 1,845 Ham ilton 11 11 454 510 Hardee 11 11 1,259 798 Hendry 9 9 868 820 Hernando 14 14 1,240 898 Highlands 15 15 2,342 1,363 Hillsbh 109 109 35,723 24,101 Holm es 23 23 1,820 1,328 1,340 Indian Rivr 17 17 1,683 Jackson 32 32 3,665 1,822 Jefferson 11 11 798 837 Lafayette 5 5 582 543 Lake 42 42 3,222 4,736 2,656 Lee 58 58 3,755 4,049 Leon 25 25 11,744 Levy 14 14 735 1,387 580 Liberty 7 7 706 Madison 15 15 1,428 1,30i 4,309 Manatee 39 39 4,874 Marlon 35 35 4,592 1,440 3,743 Martin 17 17 1,302 Monroe 23 23 3,132 4,306 Nassau 12 12 1,014 1,449 1,979 Okaloosa 30 30 8,344 Okechobee « « 545 470 Orange 11« 11« 14,652 11,168 1,047 Osceola 15 15 1,193 Palm Beh 124 124 19,165 12,3«9 Pasco 34 34 4,419 39,959 3,135 Pinellas 230 330 15,993 Polk 91 91 17,435 11,953 Putnam 37 27 3,811 1,73« St. Johns 30 30 1,947 1,195 St. Lucie 18 18 3,443 3,079 Santa Rosa 33 33 «,441 1,5t9 Sarasota 41 41 4,34« 4,435 3.5S9 Seminole 37 37 3,745 Sumter 13 13 88« 1,014 Suwannee 33 33 1,«44 1,790 Taylor Union 19 19 1,«07 1,472 7 7 S07 30« Volusia 87 87 1«,338 «,483 Wakulla 9 9 734 400 Walton 33 33 3,054 1,543 1,17« Washlngtn 14 14 1,850 (Conttnued from Page Oat) moving ahead, Don Stoneburner and George Taglaris reported. Five marching bands. Riverside Kiltie band of Sarasota Riverview High, the Mummers band of Miami, the Cape Coral Drum and Bugle Corps, Everglades and Naples High School bands have agreed to appear, according to Mrs. Rachel Blodgett, secretary-treasurer. Li addition there will be three Shrine bands, the Orients, the Pirates and the Bagpipe bands. Pete Stone announced that Shriners will also send down several fun units including the Jadcass Patrol. Members of the board* agreed to permit the VFW to sell a barbecued chicken and rib dinner on race day at the track. Herb Fries presented the request of the VFW. The Shrine Club was also granted permission to sell peanuts at the races. Ticket sales are golnfc rapidly by mail, Mrs. Blodgett told the group. They went on lale in downtown stores Saturday. Mafl orders for tickets are being received at the swamp boggy office, P.O. Box 1561. Plans are being made to have the parking lot mowed and seats which have been at the stock car track brought back and set up. Gasoline for this year’s race will be furnished through courtesy of Frank Panapinto’s new Cities Service Station on the North TVaU. Weston reported that he had been assured by Jim Snyder of the United Telephone Co. that a portable pay phone will be installed on the grounds for the use of race patrons. Others attending the meeting last night included Walter Rogers and Hugh Gramling of the Chamber of Commerce; Mike Lee, Golden Gate Jaycees; John Merva, Lions Club; Joe Stier, Moose .Qub; Bobb Derr, Executive Airlines; Lee Hancock, racing drivers. Try the Exciting “Gourmet Burger” Chris* Gourmet Castle No. Trail at 14th Avc. ELECTION '70 “Bud” Dickihson against Republican James R. Sabatino of Miami, a former industrial claims Judge. STATE TREASURER INSURANCE COMMISSIONER — Democrat Tom O’Malley, former Dade County vice mayor, against GOP State Sen. Tom Slade of Jacksonville. Both won party nominations in the first primvy. SECRETARY OF STATE — Democratic State Sen. Dick Stone of Miami against Republican Don Meiklejohn, former beverage com missioner. Stone won in the first primary and his op* ponent drew no GOP votes. EDUCATION COMMISSIONER - Incumbent Democrat Floyd Christian faces Republican Robert Froemke of Boca Raton, a former Florida Atlantic University dean. Both were unopposed in their parties. Secrtary of Agriculture Doyle Conner, a Democrat, is unopposed throughout the elections. Hal Dekle of Miami won a State Supreme Court seat in the first Democratic primary, having no GOP opposition. Kirk-Askew Battle (Contlnned from Page One) submited his resignation from the Senate to run for governor. Kirk told Askew he hoped he didn’t win because he was the best man the Democrats had in the Legislature. Eckerd’s own statement of defeat was sad and paced like a eulogy. “I’m sorry we didn’t make it,” he told his workers at a Fort Lauderdale motel. “I know you are. God bless you aU.” “I’m an amateur in politics,” Eckerd told a reporter later. He said aides had misled him on how well he might do. During televised debates last Sunday both Eckerd and Kirk had pledged to support the GOP nominee for governor. After Kirk won Eckerd said, “I’ve always voted for Republicans in the general election and this year is no different” An Eckerd aide said the questions of public stq;>port and donations were open. Eckerd spent abnost $1.1 niillion — mostly his own money — in his losing bid for nomination while Kirk has spent less than one-third of that winning. But Buzz Rummell, Eckerd’s press aide, said Eckerd had been disappointed at losing. “I don’t think that he’ll really get out and actively campaign,” Rummell said. Kirk had run two different campaigns, playing hard to find in the first primary but pulling only 48 per cent of the vote. With defeat Just one ballot away, Kirk came out punching. He debated Eckerd on television and podiums across the state and bought advertising in the state’s major papers. Althou^ there were 13,000 fewer voters Tuesday than on Sept 8, Kirk increased his first primary showing by 23,000 votes while Eckerd innproved his Sept 8 total by Just 11,460. Kirk’s renomination also automatically roiominates Lt Gov. Ray Osborne. •NAPLES THEA1RE: •    NOW SHOWING • tf’Epk; battle •    ofthe •    sexes.' e n.v.tmmm • Askew’s running mate. Secretary of State Tom Adams, also won the Democratic nomination for lieutenant governor. Faircloth had much of his campaign against Adams whom he said would control Askew if he were elected. In the Republican race, Kirk carried all counties except Alachua, Charlotte, Collier, Escambia, Gilchrist, Glades, Hernando, Lee, Monroe, Pinellas, Santa Rosa and Sarasota. Askew’s victory left only these counties to Faircloth: Baker, Bay, Bradford, Broward, Collier, Columbia, Dade, Dixie, Duval, GUchrist, Gulf, Hamilton, Indian River, Jefferson, Levy, Monroe, Nassau, Sumter, and Suwannee. Ertto Confesses Sfce Wes Worried FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) - Erika Kirk, wife of Florida’s governor, said Tuesday night she had been frightened by the prospect of Jack Eckerd defeating Gov. Claude Kirk for the Republican gubernatorial nomination. The comment came in her answer to a question about whether she was confident her husband would win ren<»nination. “I was pretty confident but you couldn’t be sure,” Mrs. Kirk replied. “Someone with that much money; you know, it’s frightening. If he were a better man, ^at would be different.” Richard Burton Genevieve : Bujold * HalWaÍlus PRODUCTION I ¿Àm(^ m »uwrtimnciuM glfl-s- ^ LAST NITE IONITE SHOWTIMES: 7:00 8i 9:05 MD TORTURE RUN RUNPftNTI VINCENT PRICE CHRISTOPHER LEE PCTERCUSHINQ çpiOR...u..c... ^a.ni MARY'S MAID SERVICE SAWYER’S CARPET & TILE U49 DAVIS BOULEVARD Ml 2-2I8S •    TRANSPORTATION PROVIDED •    COMPtETE MAID SERVI« •    INSURED    • CLEANINO •    IRONING • WASHING • CHILD CARE AVAILABLE FOR PARTIES HOURS CAU 642-9136 lAJLMtPJL MONDAY im FRIDAY ;

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