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News Tribune: Wednesday, July 31, 1963 - Page 1

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   News Tribune (Newspaper) - July 31, 1963, Fort Pierce, Florida                              Vero Beach Wednesday, July ROUNDUP The Voice Of Indian Riverland More Vero Newf On Pages By Tom Cope TH6 GIRLS have been circu- lating a among has aroused great curiosity among the men. And the men are being made miserable by the girls, who show them the title on the cover but, refuse to lei them read what's inside, as it Is "for wom- en only." The title of the book is and Girl" and I! .should be a nationwide best- seller but apparently the great female conspiracy lias prevented this. At least, I never heard of it until recently, when a misera- ble fellow complained to me that he was being cut off from something good. Torn by pity, 1 used my channels lo tbe New York publishing world and ob- tained a copy of SSG, which I have read and passed on to my friend, with orders lo get if cir- culated among the men as fast as possible. After all, there is not too mucli lime left. If Ibis thing really gels going thousands of conniving females are going lo "sink into" (the author's expres- sion) a vasl number of unsus- pecting and ingenuous males. Tht author's miiden name, appropriately enouah, wa> Helen Gurley. At 37, she be- came Mrs. Brown. In the in- terim she had been a Single Girl but, as the old saying 9oes, she did not let the grass grow between her powdered and per- fumed toes. She learned to be- come, by her own admission, the perfect husband-hunter, and the got the perfect husband. Mrs. Brown allows that it's net in the cards for every Single Girl to do this, she urges her less lucky listen to "not take singleness lying a somewhat equivocal state- ment, considering her recom- mendations- It would nol be fair lo discuss the contents of the book here. In any case, it is merely Ihc last of a long series devoled to the mir- acle of the 20th Century, tbe Neamfe (New American Female to he confused with the mixed-tip NympheU Only, per- haps this opus is more mature and honest than most of its popu- lar predecessors, and therefore teller worth I mean by men. It is dedicated to David (the highly sophisticated Mr. It should have been dedicated to The Shy American. It could also have been entitled, "Why The Neatnfe is a far more potent force in human affairs than most of us stupid men She represents the first human condition in which it is possible to have your cake and eat is, she enjoys most of the male's prerogatives, PLUS his continued, childishly chivalrous protection- This is a subject that should be taken up by positive historians rather than by mere decriers Mom- ism, like Philip Wylie. SSG is a positive study, which faces the awful fact that there are not enough men to go around and warns us that certain social revisions are going to be made, whether Mom or Grandpaw like of not. The former Miss Gin-- ley is a top honest and honorable one, even though she claims she is not too at- tractive physically. If that's really her pan on the dust jack- et, we'll take all the unaltrac- five ones there are. AMOUNT OF BID IS deary Low On Sebastian Span Circus Clowns Behind the masks of makeup are Kenny Lyons, 7, Rene Martin, 7, and Mike Cox, of the many acts enjoyed by children at the three-ring circus on Monday. (Photo by Tom Longhurst) Goldwater-F or-President Rally Held At Vero Beach Tribune Vero Beach Bureau) Basil LaVirgne, slate chairman for Hie Draft Goldwater Commit- tee, was slated as the guest speaker at a meeting of the com- mittee in Vero Beach Tuesday evening at the Community Build- ing. Introduced by Major Duncan T. T. Troulman, chairman of the meeting, LaVirgne did lillle more than make a few congratulatory remarks to the Vero Beach Draft Goldwaler Commillee before turning the meeting over to his next-door neighbor for the main speech ot the evening. Peter Pare Is Taken By Death; Services Today (News Tribune Vero Beach Bureau) Peter Parr, 70, of Cherry bane, Vero Beach, died Monday at In- dian River Memorial Hospital. Born in Streator, 111., he moved to Vero Beach three years ago from Cuba, Mo. He was a mem- ber of the Methodist church and Beach on Lodge No. 3, A. F. and AAI., of St. Louis, Mo. Survivors include the widow, Katherine Parr of Vero Beach; a brother, Thomas Parr, St. Lou- is; Iwo sisters, Mrs. HaTcl Sun- derland of Vero Beach, and Mrs. Clara Swanson Of Ottawa, 111. Funeral services were lo be today at 3 p.m from Cox-Gif- ford-Baklwin Funeral Home chap- el, with Ihe Rev. Jack Powell officiating. Burial will be in Crestlawn cemetery with grave side Masonic services. BIG BELT. At least one na- tionwide insurance concern is offering an extraordinary bonus for the promotion of safety belts in cars: the payment of 150 per cent medical fees it the victim of an accident was wearing a bell at ihe lime. It you don't belive SaWgragS SCnnOD It ask Ed Says he, "That's right. If vwr bill jl.OOO, mil firm will pay J1.5W- to ineUUnt.lly, belt is not iiKt for Hw wjy. half (45 cent) 9f dMttH occur 45 mph Quito Likes Pact QUITO, Ecuador (API-Ecua- dor looks upon the American- Eritish-Spviel nuclear test baa agreeme'nt "with deep satisfac- and intends lo sign il. a Foreign Ministry statement said IWesday. H. W. Rillenbroad, of Fort Lauderdale, business consultant and paid-up members of the Lauderdale branch of the com- millee, addressed the approxi- mately 100 persons present. In a talk chiefly distinguished for its anecdotes, off-color jokes and at least one'four-letter Anglo- Saxon word, Ritlsnbroad lam- basled "those who went to Har- vard and are in Washington in high places today who tell us the constitution is outdated." He blamed tbe present admin- istration for all lhat ails Ihe coun- try today, the censorship that he asserts exists between the mili- tary and news media, and ac- cused them of aborting states' rights. Beaiitificatiou Soeiety Meets On August 1st (News Tribune Vei-o Beach Bureau) The Vero Beach Beautification Society will hold a meeting al Ihe Chamber of Commerce build- ing on Aug. 1 at p.m. The meeting was called by Glenn Smith, president of the So- ciety, for the purpose of discuss- ing the recent Beautification Day project and for making future plans. Asked to attend are members of the Sociely and representatives of the Presidents Council. Almost certain to be the main topic of discussion will be possibility of raising a further to complete sodding the remaining two-thirds of Htsnis- Ion Park, which was the Socie- ly's annual Beautification Day project last Saturday. Owens Named To Probe Group TALLAHASSEE (AP) A first termer in the Florida House, Rep, William E. Owens 01 Martin conn ty, was appointed Tuesday to a vacancy on Vat Legislative Inves- tigations Committee. House Speaker Hallory Home appointed Owens to replace Rep Earl Fiircloth of Dade County resigned. Fairdoth said -his pri vale law practice was too demand Ing for ouUide activities "Citizens have been fired on, and riots have been aided and abetted for one-reason 'to get voles, more votes on elec- tion time." He said there is something wrong in a counlry when a man who speaks up against [he admin- slration is called a suiwr-patriot, extremist and a reactionary, but said that if love of counlry makes him all of these Ihings, he was ?lad to sland up and be counted for Senator Barry Goldwater. Rittenbroad said he was fed up with those who sneered and re- garded il as a sin lo make a profit. He said lhat tl was a sin nol to, and that profits are the only way to make the counlry prosperous. -He lold the audience that they can help change the course of his- tory lhat they belong to a great organization capable of doing this American public. 'The decisions you make (o- nighl will delermine which way the county will he said "We are al Ihe crossroads, Ihe swing to left has accelleraled hut the line has finally been drawn." Ftitlenbroad lold the audience that there is only one man on the American scene today thai can carry Ihe conservalives to vic- tory in and he is Barry Goldwater. 'A recenl survey has shown lhat if we get Goldwater inated, he will win over Ken- he said. "We must band logelher and form committees in every town, village and hamlet across the LaVirgne thanked Rittenbroac (or his address, and in a final appeal to the audience urges them lo talk lo Iheir neighbors and get Ihem lo sign petition forms and donate a dollar for htc national fund. "Goldwater stands for states he said, "We can settle integration our way, we don't need Washington to come to Flor- ida (o settle it for us." In calling for volunteers to assist in the campaign, he askec the audience, "Who will pu< on the armor and go out into the field to help Major Troutman asked al members to contribute 2Sc lowtrdj ihe cost of i lelegran bearing their signatures lo Stn Goldwater, urging him lo accept trw Domination. Heap Cute Squaw Flaxen-haired Evelyn Oil, 9, was one of the scores of children who took part in the three-ring circus held at the Youth Center ou Monday to mark the end ot the six-weeks-long program of activities organized by the Vero Beach Recreation Dcpt. (Photo by Tom Longhursl) Winners Shirley Allen, 9, with her prize-winninf; Poke "Moppie" who walked away with the first prize for the "Largest Eyes" at ttio Pet .Show, and, right, the "Largest Eyes" at the Pet Show held at Vero Beach last week as an annual affair. (Photo hy Tom Windup Of Hearings In Rail Dispute Is Near Work Started On Extension Of A1A By TOM LONGHURST (Nowi Ti-llmno Vero Burwu Chief! The West Palm Beach construction firm of Cloary Bros. Inc., was the apparent low bidder for the Sebastian bridge contract when bids wero opened at tile load Depl. in Tallahassee on Tuesday. Their bid of the lowest of seven sub- Hilled, will be accepted by tho provided no errors ire found in the bidding. John I'liillips, SHD chairman, told Sen. Merrill P. Barber by phone yesterday that work on the long-await- ed on-again, off-again link between Indian River and Jrcvard counties should commence in a cottple of vecks, and bo completed in eight months. PT tr rr The structure and equivalent length of approach voad lo lire bridge are scheduled o IMS finished in time to coin- cide with the complelion of work on (he three-mile cxlcjision of the VIA from Wabnsso Rd, lo Iho Sebastian Inlet, The I''orl I'iercc firm of Gor- lam Construction Co. slijrlcd ii'ork tm the road pro- ject this week. Tlie opening of the bridge, ac- cording lo Sen. Barber, will be Maj. Gen. Hurley Dies At 80 SANTA FK, NJ.VI. Gen. Patrick J. Hurley, World War If ambassador who claimed Dial U.S. State Department policy contributed to the Communist conquest of China, is dead at the age of 10. Hurley died in his sleep Tiles- day nighl at his homo, apparently of a heart attack. He had not been ill. The tall, gregarious soldier and the grcalcsl thing thai him hap- pened lo Ihe county in many years. "Wlicn those two proJccU are completed, il will give In- dian River Counly a direct su- perhighway connection with moon-lraoin arcn Of Patrick Air Force Hase and Cape he commented. Barber predicted thai many iwoplo working al Canaveral will welcome the opportunity to in Indian Uiver Counly, which, wiUi (ho bridge linking Ihe two counties logelher, will be only alxnil 45 minutes away, should provide a trerncn. doii3 Impact on our area, and I know of nothing that could give a greater boosl lo the economy of nil of Indian River he said. Son. Barber und liobcrl W. Craves, chairman of Ihe County Commission, took part this morn- ing in official ceremonies mark- Ing Die start of construction of A'M projccl. diplomat I I government serv- ice as a privsio in th? territory 1902, volunteer cavalry in Before ho quit in 1015 as am- bassador to Chaing Kai-shek's government and retired from the Army, he had been secretary of war in President Herbert Hoov- er's cabinet a diplomalic Iroubleshootcr for P r e s i cl e nl Frank Jiooscveil. Three limes after resigning his China post, Hurley, a Republican, sought election lo Ihe U.S. Senate from New Mexico. Ksich lime he was defeated by a Democrat. Hurley's wartime role in China got buck in the news in March of 1002, when Ihc Stale Department released its secret China papers of 1913. 'Ilic papers included a report from Hurley to fUxtsevell spying that Chiang Kai-shek has grave doubts about attending Hi? Yalta conference wjlh Soviet Premier Joseph because of -Stalin's desire lo communizc China. Ihiriey quit in prntc.il when President Harry S. Truman im- plemented Ihe Yalta agreement, under which Russia cnleml the war Japan He called Ihc agreement a blueprint for a Com- irmnisl victory in China. Kusk Delegation Leaves Friday For Moscow (AP) Secre- f Inry state Rusk and i delegation including five senaiuj's will leave for MOJ- _ cow Friday night to attend formal signing of the nuclear lest ban tceaty. 'Hie IWiile House announced 'Inn loday and named the scna- f.' lorial delegates as DomncrnU fulbright of Arkansas, Hubert fir Humphrey of Minnesota and John 0. Paslore of IlhrHie Island; and f-everell Sallonstall Massachusetts and George Aik- en of Vermont. The lisl nolably omiltcd Ken. Kvcrotl M. Dirksen, the Senate X licnubJJcaj) leader from Jlljnoij and Sen, Bourkc R. Ilickcnlnop- cr of rowa. senior HOP member .j of Ihc Senate Foreign Hclationi C'omrnitlcc. Holh of these Republican lead- ers have indicated Ihey did not wanl lo nllend Ihc Moscow sign- IT ing nnd have lefl it open as to they might vole on Ihc atom- ic test ban treaty when it comes f- the Senate for ratification. IIIILADKIJIflA Dr. n Harry Shay, IB, director of Pels Research institute and clinical professor of medicine al the Tem. pie University of cine, died Tuesday, WASHINGTON 'APi The Senate Commerce Commillee aims lo hear once again from each side in the railroad-labor dis. pule, then wind up its hearings on President Kennedy's plan for averting a nationwide strike. "If we could jusl keep both sides guessing for a while as lo what we will do, Ihey might do some effective act- ing committee chairman John 0. Pastore told newsmen Tuesday nighl. The fUxxfe fslanrl Democrat has been pressing the railroads and the five unions to settle Iheir v.ork rules wrangle through horgninms rather than throush legislation. Pastore Eatd he (o end the hearings Thursday nighl after hearing from carrier spokesmen tonight and then "il probably will fair lo hear from the brother- hoods again." but it rxrt, lot. Low In Secretary of Labor W. Willjard tomer- MVtfWilt Wirtz met for two hours with car- T ricrs' representatives and a Labor Department spnkc-rnar, siiirl he probably will meet both sides today. Figger On I) to IS mph. July 31, 1M3 Knnafl Today KunrlKe Tomorrow a.m. Bob Hope says they have a dif- ferent kind of TV syslcm in Rus- iia. There, it waiihw yon! To'laya Anniversary: major Efiniru 111 American Army, 1777,   

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