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Fort Pierce News Tribune Newspaper Archive: January 14, 1952 - Page 1

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   Fort Pierce News-Tribune (Newspaper) - January 14, 1952, Fort Pierce, Florida                               NIWS-TRIBUNi Ofcjecti.es Piwtt and St. LHCM Agricultural Development. New Industries. Beach and Tourism Dev South Overpass. FORT PIERCE NEWS-TRIBUNE Htmrt of tkt River Section LOCAL DATA SUNDAY'S (24 hour period ending Maximum.....................----......-...... 71 59 Rain______................................ -00 Barometer -3022 FORTY-NINTH YEAR, No. 28 DECEMBER 11. 1SCS FORT PIERCE, FLOSIDA, MONDAY. JANUARY 14, 1952 ASSOCIATED PKESS AP FEATUBJE SERVICE SINGLE COPY: 5 CENTS BARGELADEN WITHDYHAMIIE BLOWN INTO BAY Gale-Driven Snow And Rain Pelt Cali- fornia Lowlands SAN FRANCISCO A dy- barge, ripped from Its mooring ky blustering gale, was taken JB tew by the Coast Guard today after four hours of drifting IB stormy San Francisco Bay. One man rode the storm-tossed barge through its voyage from the powder plant at Hercules into San Pablo Bay. It vrzs taken in tow Marc Iflac-i. Hcrou'es is en the bay 20 miles northeast of Francisco. UK gate which sent the barge on its perilous trip deepened the heavy blocking mountain roads while torrential rains flooded the lowlands. The weatherman forecast more rain for todar, tonight and Tues- i day i The winds uprooted trees and j tore down power lines, blacking out three residential sections in San Francisco, nearby Daly City, at least five areas on the east shores of San Francisco Bay, and scat- tered cities throughout Northern California. Display windows were blown out in two big San Francisco Roos Brothers and Macy's. Winds of up to 75 miles an hour were reported at Red Bluff. A 50 mile cross wind swept Tra- vis Air Force Base, forcing its in- coming planes to land at Oakland. More rains flooded California lowlands where fled their homes during the weekend. The wind whipped new snows in- to the Sierra Nevada, where main highways already were blocked and transcontinental trains were 30 hours beyond schedule. The Weather Bureau said the wind, snow and rain hitting North- ern California today were merely the southern edge of a large, in- tense storm centered off the North- ern Washington Coast and moving southward. The new storm was expected by tonight to spread rains to rain soaked Los Angeles and snows to the traffic impeded mountain re- tort areas of Southern California. The Reno area of Nevada was so piled with snow that road crews worked far into Sunday night seek- ing to free trapped motorists. Everybody from millionaire to truck driver, felt the gathering ef- fects of the storm. QUIET thing it was Saturday because, like hundreds of other Reao resi- dents, Truant Officer Neal Scott couldn't free his car from tow- ering mound of snow that fell in Nevada. More than 18 inches fell in Reno for heaviest snow- fall in 15 years. (AP Wirepho- Airliner Dives Into East River With 36 Aboard NEW YORK A Northeast j airliner dived out of heavy fog and ARMY'S GAMBLE ON NEW TANKS PAID OFF FORT KNOX, Ky. of Staff Gen. J. Lawton Collins said today the Army was forced to "gamble" when it ordered produc- tion of new tank designs before service tests were made but that initial "serious deficiencies" have been overcome and the gamble won. A speech prepared by Collins for delivery at the annual meeting of the United States Armor Associa- tion clarified a situation produced by reports many light and medium tanks failed to pass inspection. Confusion had arisen from an ob- scurely worded Army explanation. The chief of staff explained that when the Korean War started there were no light tanks in production: no medium tanks had been pro- duced since World War n although about 800 World War n Pershing mediums were being equipped with new engines, and heavy tanks were only on paper." The decision w as to make a fam- ily of three new tanks light, medium and heavy. Collins "After a careful review of all factors, we decided that since the prototype of the light tank had undergone extensive testing we could afford to gamble on it. In the medium field we were not in so fortunate a position. However, we' still decided to go ahead and use the new high velocity 90 milli- meter gun. were also forced to take other gambles. Since 12 to 18 months lead time is required from the time a contract is let until the first tank comes off the pro- duction line, we decided to forego the normal procedure of building pilot models for engineering and service tests. We felt that if any deficiencies occurred they could be corrected in the early phases of production, or modified later be- fore issue to troops. "It is history now that we did find serious deficiencies in both the new light and medium tanks. And, as was_expected, they were generally to the turret components. Early, test revealed 15 major deficiencies in the medium tank and about the same number in the light tank which would have to be corrected before these tanks could be considered suitable for general issue to troops. "All of the deficiencies which I have "referred to have been cor- rected in the vehicles now coming off the production lines.'The modi- fications of the medium tanks are. now being tested at Camp Jrwin, Calif., and the light tanks are be- ing tested at Camp Drum, N- Y., the latter part of this month. It is our belief that the outcome of these tests wfll further prove that our new- tanks are better than any- j thing we have had before and more i than a match for their Soviet coun- terparts. ALUES DEMAND REDS PROVE 'LIE' CHARGES Conununsts Also Charge Planes Flew Over Manchuria MUNSAN, Korea. Tuesday Communist negotiators accused the United Nations Command of "en- gaging in lies" in proposing pris- oner exchange Monday, and the charge brought _a prompt Allied de- mand to prove the charge or retract it. Additional heat added to the stormy session by Communist charges that Allied planes flew ov- er several cities in Manchuria on Sunday. Allied negotiators on the truce supervision subcommittee switched tactics Monday after failing for three straight days to get an oral statement of the Communist stand on airfield reconstruction. Instead the U. N. asked the Reds to agree to restrictions. The request got a chilly recep- tion. The Reds charged that Allied planes flew over Mukden, Wushien and other Chinese communities but did not say any were attacked. A Fifth Air Force spokesman at Seoul denied that any Allied planes flew over Northeast China Sunday. The outburst of Communist per came after Rear Adm. R. E.; Libby explained that the Allied vol- untary prisoner repatriation plan would be advantageous to the Reds as well as the U. N. "If your statement has been pre- pared in order to deceive a part of the people of the world who are ignorant, it would be all said North Korean Maj. Gen. Lee Sang Cho. it would not suit us. "You had better not say any more that you would do us any favors. Tsa. "Should you continue to say so, it would mean that you tell a big lie." Admiral Libby retorted: "I do not know whether I have personally been called a liar, but I got a strong inference. I shall study the record and make China Said Mobilizing For Invasion of Southeast Asia Truman Financial Chart for Coming Year Adds Up to Billion Deficit .WASHINGTON President J from an estimated 70 billions for Truman's financial chart for the the current year and only 45 bil- govemment next year adds up to about 15 billion dollar deficit, officials said today. That would be two to three times lions last year. 2. Present tax laws will bring in about 70 billions next fiscal year, leaving an estimated deficit of ap- bigger than any red ink operation 5 15 billions if condi- since World War II- It probablyI tions remain unchanged, would swell the national debt close 3, Although the administration to or above the present legal limit for several years has insisted on of 275 billions. j taxes high enough to balance the Authorities familiar with the fig- budget, Mr. Truman in this elee- ures but preferring not to be quot- tion year won't demand excise or ed directly told a reporter this is j income tax boosts to close the gap the picture President Truman will j between outgo and income, present to the election year Con-1 4 instead, the administration gress in his annual budget message j wm press for tighter tax enforce- one week from today, barring meat closing of alleged "loop- minute changes: 1. Government spending in the fiscal year beginning July 1 will reach about 85 billion dollars, up If the national economy continues to expand rapidly, and Congress approves the proposed tax reforms, the projected deficit may be reduced to near 10 bil- lions. 5. Large portions of the So bUlion dollar spending program were au- j thorized by Congress in past years. Requests for new appropriations i will total only about S3 billion. 10 billion less than Mr. Truman i sought for the current year. Figuring probable government j spending during the coming year at SO to S3 billion dollars, the Cits- i zens Committee for the Hoover Re- port said that will mean a mini- 3 mum of S513 for each man, woman and child in the country, or j per family. The committee sent a telegram I to Mr. Truman Sunday night urg- ing him to press for reorganization I plans which the group said would 1 save more than five billion dollars a vear. crashed today into the East River in the middle of New York City- The airline said all 36 aboard were saved, but rescue workers said they could account for only 34. The two engined Convair plane, flying near blind and trying to make a radio landing at La Guard- ia field, hit the river just north- west of the field near the juncture of three metropolitan boroughs. The plane sank swiftly in the rapid current The Port of New York Authority said it counted only 34 saved. A swarm of police, coast guard and private vessels worked to haul out survivors and take them ashore. The airline said it was advised by the plane's pilot. CapL Al Marsh, that he was the last to leave the plane and none was left behind. Stewardess Carolin Hull al- so advised that all were rescued. Two persons were reported se- riously injured- Most of the survivors were suf- fering from shock and submersion. County Commission To Meet Thursday The County Commission meet- sg regularly scheduled for Tues- day morning has been shifted to Thursday morning due to the comrnissioners being in Tallahas- see for a State Road Board meet- ing. Meeting of the city commission scheduled for tonight has been postponed to Wednesday night for the same reason. MINESWEEPER HIT WASHINGTON' -2V-The Navy re- ported today that the minesweeper j Dextrous was by enemy shore fire Friday and that one man was j and two ethers wounded. i Handy tools i got in the News- Tribune Want I've bored boles to let the mice South Koreans, Reds Clash On Western Front SEOUL, Korea Korean infantry and Chinese Reds clashed today in a series of battles on Korea's western front In the heaviest action, the South Korean First Division battled four hours in an unsuccessful attempt to win back hfll positions west of Korang- po lost to the Reds Dec. 28. Northeast of Panmunjom. the truce conference site, other South Korean soldiers recaptured one of two hflls they lost to the Chinese Sunday night. U. S. Fifth Air Force said snow, fog and haze held down fighter and bomber strikes Monday. Fleet F-86 Sabre jets, sweeping MIG Alley over Northwest Korea, spotted about 40 Russian-made MIG-15 jets oa the Manchurian side of the Yalu River border, but no contact was made. Pilots of other U. N. planes re- ported they inflicted about 85 Red troop casualties in close support attacks along the warfront and cut rails at 31 places in North Korea. The South Koreans pushed off before dawn Monday against two hills guarding Paik's peak. But elements of a. counterattacking Red battalion blunted the assault and drove them back four hours later. A U. S. Eighth Army staff offi- cer said the close in fighting was "bitter." Paik's Peak, lost to a Red ar- mored thrust last month., is close to the two hflls. The staff officer said Sunday's action across the Peninsula was mostly raiding patrols and light probes. He said their purpose was to "take prisoners, inflict casualties and destroy etnripnient, supplies or communications, then return to base without occupying enemy positions." Churchill In Commonwealth Speech Tonight OTTAWA Prime Min- ister Winston Churchill follows ap his talks -with Canadian leaders today with a full-dress speech aimed at rallying the common- wealth to new efforts against world communism. A formal Canadian-British com- munique wfll be issued before the speech announcing the results of bis three and one-half days of meetings with Prime Minister Lou- is St. Laurent and other Canadian cabinet ministers. The chief reported result of his visit, naming of Field Marshal Viscount Alexander to a high defense post in j ably wfll not appear in the joint announcement. During his stay. Churchill re- portedly offered Alexander, who now is governor-general of Canada, a new. top level job, possibly that of Britain's defense minister. Churchfll himself now holds the post. But informed diplomats said Churchfll wfll wait nntfl later be- fore officially disclosing what new duties he has in mind for the 60- year-old British war hero. I Churcbiirs speech tonight, his 1 first in North America since his {address early in 1949 at Cam- bridge's Massachusetts Institute of Technology is scheduled for p.m. It wfll be carried by two Canadian radio networks, the British Broadcasting Company and by the Mutual Broadcasting Sys- tem in the United States. Tuesday 4he British prime min- ister will fly back to Washington, he is to make a major for- eign policy speech before a joint session of Congress on Thursday. Clark Nomination To The Vatican Is Withdrawn WASHINGTON President Truman has withdrawn the nomin- ation of Gen. Hark W. Clark as U. S. ambassador to the Vatican but will name someone else in- stead. The White House announced Sun- day night the action at the request of the general, ob- viously upset by the religious con- troversy that has raged over the issue of a full fledged envoy to the papal state in Rome. A terse White House an- nouncement said: "The President plans to submit another nomination at a later Sources close to the White House emphasized that granting of Clark's request not to involve him in the controversy was not a first step in a move to drop the whole-idea. But they said they did not know who Mr. Truman might have in mind for nomination as the first full fledged U. S. ambassador sent to the Vatican, seat of the Catholic Church in Rome. Cattle Industry Rotary Subject Besides being the fastest de- veloping state as far as the cat- tle industry is concerned, Florida was the first place in the New- World to which cattle were brought from Europe, Rotarians were told at their luncheon meet- ing Monday. -Soon after this country was discovered. Ponce de Leon in 1520 brought along a boatload of cat- tle into what is now Florida." said C. W. Lewis, manager of agricul- tural and livestock development of the Atlantic Coast Line Rail- road Co. "In fact the earliest importa- tions of cattle into Florida preced- ed those of Virginia by almost a he added. Lewis went on to point out that according to the 1940 to 1950 cen- sus figures, Florida has shown the biggest increase of cattle pro- duction of any state in the United States. In that 10-year period, he said. Florida has shown an increase of 64 per cent while the overall _inr crease for the country has been IT per cent. South Dakota's cattle production has shown the next highest per- centage of increase with 50 per cent, he declared. Lewis traced the development of the cattle.industry throughout the Southeast, and told the Ro- tarians that that section of the country is the up and coming cat- tle producer. "The eradication of ticks, the introduction of breed- ing, the use of domestic pastures, have brought about increased size per animal and an improvement in quality of he said. EGYPT THREATENS TO KICK OUT ALL BRITISH CAIRO, Egypt. Egypt voiced an implied threat last night to kick out all British subjects unless they "refrain from all activities sub- versive or prejudicial to the coun- try." The Nile kingdom government said in a letter to the British em- bassy "some of the really grave tension in relations between Egypt and the United Kingdom" could have fully justified such expulsion." but that Egypt, 'by a spirit of clemency, has not wished to resort thus far to such a drastic measure." pulsion of any foreigner. i He said, however, that if the British "refrain from all activities subversive or prejudicial to the they shall "not cease to j be treated decently as persons re- j siding in Meanwhile the announced casual- ty toll in Canal Zone fighting be- tween the British and Egyptians mounted. A British spokesman said four Egyptians who sniped at searchlights at the big Tel El Ke- bir supply base were shot and killed Saturday night. According to British figures, that made 11 Egyptians killed and a Red Troops And Supplies Massed At Entry Points Red Newspaper Re- peats Charges Of U. S., British Unconfirmed reports that Red China is mobilizing for an invasion of Southeast Asia came anew today from Hong Kong and Formosa. And from Moscow came a charge that the United States, France and Britain are conspiring for "new- war ventures'' in the same area. The official Red newspaper Prav- da repeated charges that the Amer- ican Seventh Fleet has been carry- ing Chinese Nationalist soldiers to Thailand, Burma and Indochina near Communist China's southern border. The Iron Curtaui drawn tightly around the Chinese mainland since the Reds took over effectively con- cealed preparations for a Red at- tack, if one is planned. The Nationalist Chinese defense ministry in Formosa said Red troops are massed at South China bases awaiting the signal to move southward. It said huge supplies of food and war materiel are ready and more than 30 seagoing ships are loading supplies at Whampoa, near Canton. The defense ministry said some 500 smaller craft have been as- sembled at Kwangchowan, Pahoki and Yulin to "smuggle arms and ammunition to Indochina, Malaya, the Philippines and other places in The letter, from Acting Foreign I total of 66 Egyptian casualties Minister Ibrahim Farag, rejected a British protest against Egypt's attempted expulsion of a native of Cyprus who held a British pass- port. Farag added that collabora- tion with British troops occupying killed, wounded or captured since a major battle broke out earlier Saturday at Tel El Kebir after a rail line was blasted. The British said there was shooting also at Is- mailia in the Canal Zone when a the Suez Canal Zone in defiance of 1 band of guerrillas ripped 20 yards Egypt's order thst they get out of of cable from a communications the country would -justify the ex- I line. Municipal Court A total of 28 cases were brought up before City Judge Ralph WO- son in Municipal Court Monday morning. Fines totaling A ere levied and bonds amounting to were declared foneitett Four were continued and tsvo dismiss ed. Third Murder Trial Under Way Today The third first degree murder trial in less than a -week was tm- derway Monday morning in Cir- cuit Court. Susie Mae Winters, Negro, charged with the knife slaying of James Edmonds last Nov. 10, was being defended by Attorney Earl Stunner. Solomon Lowry, woo said he a witness to tne slaving in the colored section of- town, was the first witness called. Accidents Claim 10 Lives Over The Week-End By The Associated Press At least 10 persons died from accidental causes in Florida over the weekend. Five children and a man burned to death in two home fires in East Central Florida. Three young children of Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Lee Holt and then- grand uncle died in a fire near Sanford early Sunday. All were Negroes. At DeLand Saturday night Izella Lee Moore, 2. and Louis Edward 4. burned to death. Two other children and a woman got out of the house. In the Sanford fire here, Deputy Sheriff W. H. Hood said parents of the children left two kerosene lamps burning when they left to take Holt's brother to a hospital. He had been cat on the leg in a ruckus near the house, the deputy said. A panel truck veered off the paved portion of a Barlow street, swerved sharply to get back on. and overturned. Crushed under the machine was the driver. Margie Davison. 25, of Winter Haven. Mrs. Mary F. Roberts, 79, a ped- estrian, was killed when she was hit by a car at Tampa Sunday night At Jacksonville Jerry Williams. 29, Negro, was killed in the second accident he was involved in Sunday night. RePftESENTATIVfS WED riYE, N. M. state rep- resentatives one a Democrat and the other a now husband and wife. Road Program is Presented To State Board TALLAHASSEE State Road Board today decided to make a personal inspection of repair needs on the Overseas Highway to Key West before approving the toll district's 1952 budget- Brooks Bateman. manager ct the Overseas Toll District which owns and manages a big section of the road along the Keys, sub- mitted a budget as the road board opened its preliminary budget hearings. The Martin County delegation told the board its primary desire for 1952 is to get work started on bridges from Stuart to Sewall's point and from north of Stuart to Hutchinson Island. They would be i financed by million dollar bond i issue, plus S75.000 in state money. Sen. Evans Crary of Stuart told the road board "If we don't get a start on these bridges Jaring this means this probably not go- ing to get them at an." He didn't explain, but there has been more than usual opposition expressed lately to the Improve- ment Commission plan for financ- ing such Projects -with bond issues. The controversial JacksonviDe- Miami turnpike proposal entered the hearing when the SL Lucie County delegation proposed as its prime needs the widening and doubie-laning of U. S. Highway 1 j from the south city limits of Fort Pierce to the Martin County line. Frank Fee, county attorney, said "all of us are cognizant of what is going on in relation to a super- highway. All thinking people know- that the superhighway is certain to come sometime in the future. But we want U. S. 1 improved to act as a corallary for the super- highway." Cnairman McKetban said later rrnen rejecting a proposal to ex- j tend coastal Hlgnwsy A3A from the Martin County line to Fort Pierce that the just doesn't c the money to build the road. Baggett Files For Renominah'ofi W. C. Baggett. clerk of the cir- ______________ cuit court, oualified M" 3ay iodaTtiTaVhe' Bittan Out For Attorneyship County Prosecuting Attorney B. A. Bittan, "Jr.. formally announced to succeed himself for the office of county prosecuting attorney in the primary election to be held next May. Bittan was appointed to the of- fice by the governor in August of 1951 to fill the unexpired term of A. C. Simmons, resigned. The appointment is to run until Jan- uary of 1953. He has lived in Fort Pierce for the past 18 jears, coming here from Stuart, Florida. He received his early education in this city and is a graduate of St. Lucie county high ochouL He attended the University of Florida, where he was graduated with a bachelor of law degree. Since his graduation from law- school he has engaged in the prac- tice of law in this city as a part- ner in the law firm of Willes and Bittan. Bittan is a member of the Elks 'edge, the Junior Chamber of. Commerce, the first Christian J church, the St. Lucie County Bar association and the Florida Bar association. fice in the coming primary elec- tion. Baggett has held the office for the past year, having been elect- ed to fill the unexpired term of W. R, Lett, who died during office. In the coming race the full four-year term wfll be up for elec- tion. Thus far no other candidate has qualified for the office. Baggett worked for 30 years in the office of the circuit clerk as a deputy clerk before taking over his present post. He has been a resident of St. Lucie county for 30 years, com- ing here from Arcadia Besides his wife, he has a family of six boys and one girl. AUTOMOBILE BURNS Southeast The military information service said China's railroads and high- ways are clogged by heavy ship- ments of troops and supplies south- ward. French authorities in Indochina Monday said the Reds apparently are getting ready for a big push on the isolated Boa Binh Basin. 40 miles southwest of Hanoi. Communist led Vietminh rebels have concentrated anti aircraft guns in the area to shoot down French planes airlifting supplies to the isolated strongpoint at Hoa Binh. The" French have been using the airlift to supplement the few convoys which manage to get through. In New- York, Gen. Alphone Pierre Join, inspector general Of the French army, told newsmen he was pleased with results of con- ferences with TL. S. and British mil- itary experts on the defense of Southeast Asia. General Juin left Sunday by plane for Paris after asking the U. S. to extend imme- diate aid in the event of a Chinese Communist -invasion of Indochina. In Hong Kong, the independent newspaper Wah Kiu Yat Po said the Communists are freeing from political prisons truck timers, ra- iio technicians, boatmen, mechan- cs and others v.ho "might be use- ill in an Indochina campaign." The paper gave no source. I Soldiers Dead In Hotel Fire CINCINNATI early Sun- day morning fire at Cincinnati's 600-room Hotel Sinton sent fright- ened guests scurrying for any exit they could find and caused the ing to Sentral Taylor, of 3123 Ave- nue F. was almost completely de- stroyed by fire early Sunday morning Two firemen and seven persons rooming at the hotel were injured. The fire itself was confined to a linen room on the second floor but The car was parked beside Tay-1 Snioke the upper floors. ior's house and caught fire some- time around a. m. It was de- clared a total loss. The tw-o young servicemen -were in a room oa the top floor of the nine-story building. They fashioned an escape rope out of knotted sheets and were lowering them- selves when the rope parted. They plunged almost seven floors. The dead were Pvt. Harry Frank- lin Shaeffer, about 21, Harrisbarg, Pa., and Pvt, Raymond G, Hat- rack, 19. ML Cannel, Pa. COSTELI.O RESTS CASE NEW YORK Frank Costello today rested hisjrase in his contempt of the Senate trial without offering any tritnesses in his defense. The case is expected to go to the jury this afternoon. FAMILY AWAITS children of James R. Shepard, one of tee crewmen forced to i abandon the crippled freighter t Pennsylvania in tee Northern 1 Pacific, crowd around their i mother in their home in Seattle. 1 Wash., they await word from the search. Search Planes and ships in the area have reported no sight of the freighter or its 45-nian crew adrift in the heavy sess. From left to right are: Mrs. Sfieparct, Jerry, 2, Jimmy, 5, and Judy, 8 (standing (AP WEATHER Florida Continued mild and partly cloudy through Tuesday. Slightly higher temperatures in north portion tonight. Tampa and Tampa Bay MOd and partly sunny today and Tuesday, gentle variable winds. Clear tonight. MARINE FORECAST Jacksonville through Florida j Straits and East Gull GcstJe to moderate variable winds mostly 1 easterly to southerly. Partly cloudy weather throush Tuesday. i MONDAY'S LOCAL DATA k Breakwater tides 2 hours earlier) Maximum _ _ 70 Minimum _ 58 Rain _____ .00 Barometer _________ 30 32 Tuesday's Jetty Tides p. m. p. m. a. m. p. m. 'Low JEWS PA, PER   

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