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Fort Pierce News Tribune Newspaper Archive: January 11, 1952 - Page 1

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   Fort Pierce News-Tribune (Newspaper) - January 11, 1952, Fort Pierce, Florida                               NIWS-TftlBUMB OkiMtivM Part Pierce Md Lucw CiMitfy Development. New Industries. Beach and Tourism Dcvetopnent South Overpast. FORTY-NINTH YEAR, No. 27 FORT PIERCE NEWS-TRIBUNE "Publiiktd Dmily in Heart Indian Alter Section" ESTABLISHED DECEMBER. 11. 1903 FOBT PIERCE, FLOEIDA, FBIDAY, JANUARY ASSOCIATED PBESS AP SJEEV1CJG LOCAL. DATA mi DAY wtdiMfl I a, m.) iiaatimum ____________1__ ao Minimum 44 .Rain ,00 Barometer -30.42 SINGLE COPY: 5 CENTS U. S. Breaking Jet, Tank Bottlenecks ALLIED NEGOTIATORS GIVE REDS A VIRTUAL ULTIMATUM MUNSAN, Korea. Allied trace negotiators handed the Reds a virtual ultimatum today. They demanded an explanation of am al- leged CMtradiction in the Commu- aanouneed stand oo construc- tion airfields during an armi atice. Maj. Gen. Howard M. Turner said negotiations for supervising a Korean truce couldn't continue un- til the Beds explain the apparent discrepancy. Turner said the Reds last month announced they planned to build and repair airfields while a truce was in force, but denied Thursday that this is their intention. Chinese Maj. Gen. Hsieh Fang insisted that the Communist posi- tion never has changed and de- clared: "You will never get a satisfac- tory answer to your unreasonable demands." The truce subcommittee met for only minutes. The subcommittee on prisoner exchange adjourned af- ter four hours and 20 minutes. Both will meet again Saturday in Pan- munjoir. Rear Adm. R. E. Libby told newsmen that in the prisoner sub- committee "we are still trying to get them to explain their sudden shift on the doctrine of free choice they justify it and" then re- pudiate it." Thursday -Lioby accused the Communists of insisting on forced repatriation of war prisoners after the Reds said thousands of South Koreans had joined the Red armies of their own free will following capture. In the truce supervision session Turner quoted the senior Commu- nist delegate, North Korean Lt. Gen. Nam II, as saying Dec. 2: "I can assure Adm. Joy that the Korean people will certainly re- construct and reinforce their air- fields during the period of a mili- tary armistice so as to prevent the possibility of any further wanton bombing by your side and to safe-' guard the securitr of their armed forces." J On the other hand, Turner saidj as well as on many previous occasions-you stated, Gen. Hsieh, that our assertion that you i intend to increase your military j "There is no contradiction." capabilities by building airfields j Hsieh replied. "Installation of fa- 385 Federal Gambling Stamps Issued JACKSONVILLE at Ihe De- j partment of Internal Revenue to- day said eight more occupational gambling tax stamps had been is- sued, bringing the total to 3S3. Those getting stamps included: Orlando: Albert Rowe. Apopka: Albert Albert was a misrepresentation and a cilities is an internal affair that j ..T- slander. [your side has no right to look "Which statement are we to be- i into." PACIFIC CHIEFS OPEN TALKS ON INDOCHINA WASHINGTON Military leaders would "consider specific chiefs of Use major Pacific powers 1 measures to strengthen the secor- began talks today OB what can be doae in event an assault from Red Tangerine: Charlie Alexander, f China is launched against French Zellwood Joha H. Anderson, f Indochina. Such a Korea" threaten all of Southeast iry of Southeast Asia." The nature of these specific measures is shrouded in utmost t Jule Vann Corners. j would j Asia, i ,Tfae staff chiefs of secrecy. France, represented by Gen. Al- i phonse Juin, entered the confer- 1 Sritain ence with tids Question for the J rican and British chiefs: What i you do Red China invades and New Zealand, open their top Indochina? secret conference .under a dark] The replies are not likely ip in- shadow- cast by reports that the clade firm assurances of imniedi- 1 great leader of the fight against 1 ale aEd military action. Communism ia Southern Asia lies Gen- Omar Bradley, top U. S. dving in a clinic commander, and British j France and the United States, with i I observers from Canada. Australia j before he YOUNGEST SOLO ty Bennett, 10-year-old daugh- ter of Alfred B. Bennett of Con- way, Pa., is congrat- ulated by her brother. Alfred, Jr., who is 12, after Bettv completed her first solo JUght in Havana, making her the young- est solo flier on record. Her brother also held the record for several months. (AP UN Votes To Set Up Disarmament Commission PARIS (a The United N'atioas General Assembly voted 42 to 5 today to set up a 12-nation Dis- armament Commission. The body will studv step-bv-step reductions i I r -v in arms and armed forces, includ- fears, up by j" offers of limited air and naval ern .reparmg United States Ambassador in the Commu-! v !o SwAet Union, replacing led rebellion in i. OI Korea Admiral Alan G. Kirk. "rtrc-uuu u mem SIresses Of aa: sponsored the measure, the major election year alreadv upon them, achievement of the sixth U. N. t Diplomatic officials ir Assembly here. j said Britain, France and Four weeks of debate in the As- j are considering plans sembly's Political j unified military command nr-ii'itca. uciuzc iic was in incocnina t_ and home for treatment. He! make to lhe Umted EXVOY TO REDS _ George Will Take Long Time To Catch Up On Deliveries Statement To That Effect Made By Sec- retary Lovett WASHINGTON !f, The United States is breaking bottlenecks in jet fighter and tank production but j Defense Secretary Robert Lovett "estimates it will take long time to catch up on the schedules set for big-scale deliveries. The defense chief expressed this in testifying before the Senate i Armed Services Committee at a closed door session Thursday. Lovett's statement, taken togeih- er with unofficial estimates of American and Russian production, pointed up President Truman's re- private Big Four talks with east Russia and Assembly President j pooling o5 available air. land and tarv and nnecihK- Luis Padilla Nervo for one week S sea forces. 1 mate eleetloti year alreadv upon them. I in London j no U. S. chief of staff would readi- j I 4Tf> nd the U. S. ;iy recommend throwing American! UfllV IIS PlllfC to set up a j u-oops into another Asiatic HIIJ and in South-S that miohl fnllmi- the i-niir-ca _ _ Of Blood Given {that might well follow the course J enable a j of the Korean campaign to a mili- 111. OX port to Congress Wednesday that the Soviet Union "is still producing more warplanes than the free na- tions." The most recent unofficial esti- mate here is that Russia is pro- ducing about planes a year. Of these about 22.000 are first-line combat aircraft with about 70 per cent of them jet fighters. Against this is the recent esti- mate of Adm. Dewitt C. SamseT (ret.) president of Aircraft Indus- tries Association, that total pro- duction of American planes of all types may reach about a month by late" 1952: That would noon Friday the people of ibe at the rate of a year Army Apologizes To Two Girls Fired 4 Years Ago Bac( Weather j CrasMnjuries Hinders Hunf For I Are Fata' To Mariners Mrs Hughes in an attempt to reach understand- j Informants the plan was Military recommendations for a today's decision. j discussed'in the Churchill-Truman j genera- caution to be voiced bv I .-it the outset of today's talks here this week. The tone and the U. 2C. or through some less i Russia amendments it scope of to'days meeting was set j closely involved nation, preferably j ___ naa previously attempted m vain by the copamuniqiie covering the Asiatic, might result from todav's JSt- Lucie county had donated ns  vere given. from Baird Funeral home! Four shipments of the "rcf--'er re {he Rev- WUiamlhad been flora to Miam Pastor of the Com-i the drive started and munitv i report during longed service testing i j The Army's move fcto the field will be con iflursday a total of Oil pints of heavy tank production appeared "to be a reversal of .policy whfea funeral home! Four shipments of the blood but we made it. I'm awfully happy the case is all over with." Miss Deak said in a statement that "the police state can happen here unless the people, their rep- courts are colored to the dangers inherent in the granting of the summsry discharge power to civil adminis- section of Fort night Jsov. 10. j and charged with the slaying of I the woman. The slaying came in the midst of a sudden flurry of killings that struck the colored section of town about that time. Jurists in the case are Noble Blount Joha D. Buck, Dan J. Keiley, Estelle L. Paden. Helen DeFriest. Ernest T. Bailev, Alpha R- Polly, Alfred S. Jenkins, Al- bert S. Aiken. Edward A. Love, G. Herbert Call and Craig N. Studebaker. ;ound or injected into the 1952 race. Brafley Odham of Sanford. can- didate for governor. Thursday told Oi. or a i three civic clubs in the Miami I area that Johnston had told him 1 he would for Dan in the coming primary. and snow flurries. The surface search for the four; :e boats from j ia kept up all Not even a tfon will follow L a drifting bit _.. preserver. Just j, d.ecef ?ea ls survived by her :mi since ,-----------another iist church. Crema- i plane was standing by Friday af- ternoon to fly the final batchl into plasma, After processin 6 wil1 be directly to front hospitals in Korea existed as recently as a year ago. At that time the Army said it would continue experimenting with a heavy tank prototype but that "we are not going to spend money on heavy tanks simply because 'he other fellow has That referred to Russia's tank yjlii McCarty, runnerup to Gov. Ful- maintained a ler Warren in the 194S race searching the promptly denied the statement anc j -roughs vdtb the aid i said he had never discussed his j Bares. Airplries we j me two were dismissed Irom. can3idacy with Johnston and did j return lo their bases ..._._. tmance Center m St.- j not expect his support. j Coraclr. R M. Dudley, chief pi-! "rs at one time held! Aiarcn, j jonnstoa president 01 four Flor- lot of a Coast Guard Hying boat J Newr Jersey state women's j EJks" i Secretary of the Army Frank j ida dog tracks, reoertedly con-' reported simple i swimming chamoioaship title and Pace Jr. wrote the women he hopes tributed heavily to Warren's 1948' --Wc didn-t" a xot a "'vas a of the New York! the Arrays action will "serve in! campaign. trace." j City Strinrnrig association. She; He said a storm was still raging "vas ,born in Kew" City and I for anrt has oeen a resided nance men say its reported 52 tons orange juice had been served o the Elks, who are in charge of the drive locally. The orange juice supply was kept up. free of JIanhan Fruit Co. center is at the South 4th street. actually make it a heavy medium instead of a true heavy tank. some measure to restore you to the In Jacksonville. status of a respected-and trusted civil servant.'' The Washington attorneys who represented them said the women and surface sv-ens -lVCre so grea{ of the Fort 1 l -Why should I get into an ar- 1 bis plane have beer torn, lerce area for the past gument with a liar like Odham? to pieces had it fcsen forced to sit ten I never had any such conversation were charged with attending meet-! with McCarty. He positively never j ings of subversive groups, includ- has discussed his candidacy with ing one "open only to members of the Communist The air losses weekly. arc announced only Negro Dies Prom Injuries Of Wreck. J. C. (Jake) Simmons, Negro employe of Sunrise Motor Co.. died in Memorial hospital Friday morning from Injuries sustained in an accident Thursday morning OB South Federal highway in the vicinity of Scott Fruit Co. Simmons is said to have sus- tained fracture of both legs and possible internal injuries, when a wrecker with which he was work- ing to right a large tomato truck, fell en him. 900 Have Their Chests X-Rayed Approximately 900 persons had their chests X-rayed Thursday in the first day of the annual mass chest survey in the county. Most of these were at the high school, but 288 persons went to the Community Center for that purpose. Saturday's schedule at the Com- munity Center is 1 to 4 p. m. and 5 to -7. The portable unit will be at Lincoln theatre from 5 to 8 p. m. today and 1 to 4 and 5 to 3 Saturday. me. Odbam. who siid he had icy felt i hope that thr 7.80C--ton victory ship i is still afloat. Her death was the second traf- fic fatality in St. Lucie 3 i Both denied attending such meet- ness to the conversation, declared iinagine size of i roaa s ings. I that Johnston told him in Jackson-! The collision occurred at Angle _ highway, the tilosc one Coast Guards- Mee? whicn 5Irs. Hughes was driv- In his letter. Pace wrote: 1 ville on Dec. "In the course of administering the Department of the Army's se- curity program it is necessary to reiy on information received from various investigative agencies. 29: s man said. "An "abandoned ship j inS being virtually demolished _______ Slightly Warmer Fee Candidate ForFlorida Oullook Representative Carty. asked IP. a statement to the St. Peters- burg Times. McCarry said: ''It was only after extensive in- ''I have never discussed my can- vestigation and exhaustive review of all the evidence in your case that it has now been determined didacy with Mr. Johnston. I do miles away from the Cygnet HI at not expect his support. I have {midday. Apparently nothing was never solicited his supDort. If found as it was not mentioned on the screen of Ihe Liber- j tie said no charges had been fil- ty ship Cygnet TH. That anidenti- j ed pending completion of his in- led object vras estimated fo be 16 vestigation. that the original action, while war- j is anyone in Florida who has again, ranted upon the information avafl- opposed practices of the last cam- Seven airplanes were alerted for i ahlP at ihP that taken. paing, I think that I am j today's search. The widescale hunt j will continue. Coast Guard officials j said, until the men are found or 1 Plane Sums At Frank Fee. Fort Pierce attorney and former mayor-commissioner, Friday announced his candidacv and qualification for the office of Representatives in the State Legis- lature from St. Lucie county. an- be He seeks nomination to the place held for the past several legislative LAKELAND Ufi Slightiy higher temperatures generally and patch- es of light frost in the North Gains- ville District tonight and Saturday morning was forecast today by the Federal-State Frost Warning Serv- ice. The morning bulletin for Penin- the should now be reversed. "that man they survived. so that 'the jol up for the last minute rush. American Today they lie in Army mauso- ileums on Kyushu., Southern Japa- jnese island. Each day a few are from birthmarks, tattoos, finger- Truck In Fatal Crash dental work, old fractures. Battlefields Have Given Up Bodies of Two Are Injured In Auto Collision no further hope can be held that] A single-engined Waco airplane iin lsl1- terms by D. H. Saunders. Fee was born and reared in Fort Pierce, son of the late Fred and Morgan Fee. member of a fourth generation family j closely connected with develop- 1 ment of the Indian River area. His j father, an attorney, represented frost danger through Sunday. 1 St. Lucie county in the Legislature Tonight and Saturday morning: Generally fair except some cloudi- ness in Southern Dstricts. Slightly higher temperatures. Lowest temperature Saturday morning in colder locations 34 to 39 degrees and patches of light frost in north portion of Gaines- ville DistncL No frost danger in all other sec- tions- Forecast for Saturday: Partly cloudy and w anner. Future temperature outlook: Xo 'belonging to F. W_ TuxilL of .'Geneva. X. Y.. was destroyed by !fire Friday morning at the St. i Lucie airport. i Origin of the fire was not cer jtain but it tvas believed to have Charges Are Filed Against Driver Of i Franklin Chesser. driver of the track involved in an accident in I which William Curry received j fatal injuries Monday night has been charged by the highway pa- trol with improper brakes and failure to have vehicle under con trol. Curry died at Memorial hospit- al Tuesday of head injuries re- ceived upon .being hurled to tne psvejnent when Cnesser's pick- Some of the unidentified dead are carried on war lists as miss- ing. The Defense Department has At Camp Kokura on Kyushu the} most modern scientific detection! methods are used to link each body with a name. The bodies of an kflled hi j Two persons were admitted to j started from a short circuit in I the iriring. Tuxill had landed at the field a He is a graduate of the local j French General Dies Gea. Jean de Lattre died tonight, the high school, received his law de-! PARIS gree from the University of Flor- de Tassigny ida in 1S35 and has been practic- j French News Agency announced. ing here ever since with the ex- i The 61-year-old French com- ception of- time off for military tnander in chief and high corn- service in World War II. He is a jmissioner ia Indochina had been member of the law firm of Fee, j a state of coma for the pas: Parker Sample. !two days following two operations i Memorial hospital Fridav mora d-'3 y aftcmon andj He served for approximately for a of _ sent from Korea to Camp Kokura for recheck and positive identification before they are returned to the United States I ing for treatment after being in-! fr in an automobile crash on U.S. I. taxiing toward the hanger, went five years as a memoer of the lit a hole, damaging! tne plane y The injured were T. W. Clag- j Re stayed at Fort Pierce dur- sett, of the Xecc3 Convalescent raght have rePaed morning FORECAST Orange avenue extension. as; prisoners. They said 570 other Americans died after capture. Others may be listed as killed in action. The military accepts the word of two more witnesses as verification of death even though the body may not be re- I covered-immediately. Maj. Robert J. Beauehamp. chief j immediatelv East identification effort embrac- es the work of chemists, X-ray technicians, morticians, doctors, dentists, fingerprint experts, an- thropologists and clerks. The process is so thorough that a serviceman's "dog tag" is not accepted as conclusive proof ex- the body is recovered and unit officers home of Vero Beach, and Ida La mar. of 804 North 13th street. Fort 5nf hls Jammy. I years. I But around 8 o'clock Friday, His property interests include no one was around citrus groves acd developed and He 'ector mayor-commissioner, and was un- opposed in two out of three elec- j fair through tions for mayor. He also served Saturday for some dcadi- as municipal judge for several ness in south cortioa, Contir-ed rather cold tonight but with slight- ly higher temperatures. Warmer gated. at Camp Kokura as "un- world to estimate Lhe percentage i knowns" have been identified. According to Highway Patrol-jl man Jim Chancy's report, stoation wagon driven by Clag- gett. was struck from the rear by a 1946 Ford while traveling north about a half mile north of I-drio Name of tlis driver of the Ford was not available. The accident occurred a. m. It Is believed the, two injured persons are not in serious condi- tion. No f-h-rscs been filed pending further investigation. X _ _ _-__r _._, the I P'ane- it caught fire and undeveloped town property, ag- comPIetel5r ournen up. in3s for years served dir around Special Meeting Of Commission Called Special meeting of the citv cons- recond of the of the First Federal Savings Loan association. His military ser- vice was with the Navy, including duty with amphibious forces in the Pacific- area. He is 23. married, the father of a member of the week j tvvo children: been called the mayor for j Methodist chtirdi, national, state 1 o'clock tonight. and county bar associations, Coun- The m oting, the states, is ty Farm Bureau. Elks, Moose. for r- lating to highway >I -ir'lcrs re- j American Veterans of For- of w ay. i eign Wars. Jacksonville, through Florida northeast and east winds except fresh in Florida Straits. Partly cloudy through Sat- urday. East to fresh easterly winds and generally, fair through Saturday. Saturdays Scuth Bridge Tides High ra. p.m. Low p.m. Sunday's South Bridge Tides High a. m. p. m. Low a. m. p. m. (Breakwater tides 2 honrt parlier)   

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