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Fort Pierce News Tribune Newspaper Archive: January 6, 1952 - Page 1

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   Fort Pierce News-Tribune (Newspaper) - January 6, 1952, Fort Pierce, Florida                               I F.r arxl St. Agricultural Development. New Industries, Beach and Tourism Development South Overpass. TRI FQRTy-MNTH YEAB, No. 22 'Pmklithed Dmily in the U.mrt fnWt.it Section ESTABLISHED DECEMBER FGKT PIERCE, FLORIDA, SUNDAY, JANUARY 6. 1952 LOCAL DATA Maximum Miainjurfl Rain____ Barometer ao -J0.22 CHURCHILL TRUMAN PLUNGE INTO SURVEY OF WORLD STRATEGY British Prime Minister Sees 'Solid' Pros- for World Peace in 1952; Warmly Welcomed in Washington By High Officials WASHINGTON Minis- deed to renewing the comradeship ter Churchill aad President Tru- and friendship which grew up dur- laan plunged briskly into a. surrey ing the struggles of the war, and of world strategy Saturday after the British leader solemnly de- clared that Anglo-American team- work can bring "salvation on earth to struggling mankind." Bowed by his 7T years but as I aaa very glad indeed to see your President again, when 1 am able once again to pay my respects in an official capacity." ilr. Truman declared ''Great Britain i.nd the Commonwealths magnetic as ever. Churchill flew and the United States are the into Washington frpsa Xew York I closest of friends and you snd I at p.m., EST, to be warmly welcomed by Mr. Truman and his Cabinet, at National Airport. want to keep it that way. and I am sure that we will succeed in doing that." The two men drove immediately 1 When Churchill had responded to Blair House for lunch and a first round of talks running through the afternoon and evening. In their exchange of greetings both emphasized their interest in assuring peace for the world. "We have only to go along to- Churchill the Presi- each doing loyally his best Mr. Truman added the remark that "peace on earth is what we are both striving for." The British Prime Minister bad reached New York only a few hours earlier aboard the liner Queen Mary. There he stopped en route from the ship to the airport to hold a brief news conference to understand the other's point of in which he made these points: view aad the many differences in interest between our countries, and v.-e shall find ourselves safe at the end of the road, and through your vast brought peace and hope and sal- vation oa eanh to struggling man- Mad." Churchill recalled his wartime visits here to confer with the late President Roosevelt and his "maav j ASSOCIATED PRESS AP FEATURE SERVICE SINGLE COPY: 5 CENTS McGrath Orders 93 Grand Juries C d AND TOWELS An Ameri- can GI, holding an issue of soap and towels, stands with fellow prisoners in a Commun- ist P.O.W. camp in North Ko- rea, according to the caption RECONVENING CONGRESS TO SOME TOUGH DECISIONS I WASHINGTON re-! a joint session of Congress V.'ednes- j leaders will be striving for adjourn- WASHINGTON Gen-: convenes Tuesday witn tough key lo deliver bis State of the Un- j mem bv the end of June. Anv un- eral McGrath Saturday ordered decisions ahead oa de'ease MessaSe- outlining bis legss'a- finished" major business might re- specsal grand junes called into ses- j fOK-lsa pojjev. universal mili- uve genera! tertns. j quire a session in the fall. J tary training, economic controls at i economic and budget j The knotty problem of appropria- !U_ a rfctn. j __rn ._ sion throughout the nation to in- vestigate "racketeers, gangsters hov roul and organized crime syndicates.' j doers of governmeat In a dramatic move perhaps un- 1 __ precedented in its scope, McGrath The reJarrjBS lawmakers also re sel lo touh offor res'jn5e accompanying the picture directed that underworld figures 1. sel lo Iouftt .or resu which was" distributed by East- racketeers I a record numoer of foto. New- York agency" which handles photos originating in Communist China. (AP Wire- congres- 1. "The prospects for world peace are solid in 1352." 2. Regarding the threat oT a Rus- siaa war, "I doa't think- there is j any greater danger now than at i the time of the Berlin airlift pro- JACKSONVILLE Florida Building Up 35 Pet. Through Month of November vided we take prudent measures." 3. In response to a question whether he saw any advantage in a meeting between President Tru- contracts iv maa and Generalissimo Stalin of and ancient connections" in the Russia, he said: all depends United States. He added: j on the setting and the events lead- "l look forward very much in- j iag up lo it." CARLSEN AND SHIP ON WAY TO PORT LONDON Put Carl- yards astern in case anything weat a.m. a.m., EST) in Florida with a contract let to- juries. The FBI, Secret Service sioaai They wiil deal Post Office inspectors and many i anumg other xlilh other federal police agencies are j slated to cooperate in the crack-' down, McGrath said. The orders went oat to United States attorneys, who were told to! also. Government buildings, includ- i denied a flurry of reports that he t ing schools, araoaated to S46 833 was to leave the Cabinet, i 000, a gaia of IT per cent. Con- j T2ken in conjunction with tlib j tracts for roads, streets and wee-  who jumped into the sea at right back wiih the same state-1 orders on Dec. 29. were all meats that were exactly contrary I Picked up by rescue vessels, save to what had been said." Aa official U. N. Command com- munique asserted that a repeated explanation of the Allied proposal for prisoner exchange aad the Com- munist arguments that followed "indicated a misunderstanding was deliberate." 17. S. Rear Adrn. R. E. Libby, chief Allied delegate oa the pris- oner sub-cornraittee. commeated: "Tt is obvious they are kflliag time, waiting for instructions-" The communists objected to all six items of the Allied proposal on exchange of prisoaers, and ig- nored a request for immediate ex- seriously i one crewman whose body was re- covered. Once the Danish-born Carlsen reaches port he was in for a round Committee Calls For Vote on State Appointee Group ST. PETERSBURG Under terms of the resolution State Democratic Executive Com- men wanting appointment to these 7 Servicemen Are Killed, 15 Hurt mittee decreed Saturday that party- voters indicate at the polls whom the governor shall name for his top appointive jobs. The committee also restored the presidential preferential primary to Florida. It was dropped after 1932. This means candidates for the Democratic nomination for President must file in this state and have their names on the bal- i, posts would have their -names placed oa the ballot: Members of the State Road De- partmeat. three industrial commis- sioners, beverage commissioner, members of State Racing Cora- ave its support to a for a top level j _ ___ _ Security Council to i in televised hearings. j lems and w are be held at lhe Ume considers! McGrath. in testimony before the having a go at each other." such a session would do any good, j committee headed by Senator Ke-i The British Army said the care-! Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei _. f fauver suggested aa-! taker of the Christian Coptic I has offered a resolution Ae I fSCh nual federal grand jury investiga-! Church at Suez was killed, his body for a sPeciaI meeting of the Se- MJ rlClHVJ VlQJII tions into crime conditions. The j dragged through the street and set CouncU, with the first order v suggestion was adopted as one of afire, and the church gutted bv of busmess to be consideration of i Eng. the committee's recommendations, j fire Fridav. Host Egvotians are ilhe Koreaa armistice.- j J-- S- serv.ce planes crasaed in a The attorney general also an-! Moslems i S. Delegate Benjamin Cohen mass of wrecsage on an declared such action might disrupt runway here Saturday the armistice talis ia Korea. wsht- Seven American serricemea _ _ jptics in Egvot are nounced Saturday that the Justice! mostly descendants of Egyptians' Department's criminal division, j who adopted Christianity in the headed by Assistant Attorney Gen- j 4th century. eral James M. Mclnerney. is es- British officials said the Egvp- tablisaing a new '-racket unit" to coordinate information on the un- derworld to be gathered by the 93 tian government was trying to hush up some of the incidents in Suez. A number of delegations of the I JdUed 15 others ia- small countries, however, favor any attempt by the big powers to talk things over aad Vishiaskv's mission and tag commission- j er. The resoluti.a provided that ho- i _____ subject special graad juries and other AI Balagh as saying ries- I "traitors acting as British soies" This also is in line with a Ke- intervened in fighting between the British and Egyptian police aad "commandos" Friday aad fired oa Egypliaas from the rear. The A Cairo dispatch quoted the I drew considerable sup- fau'.-er Committee recommenda- i tion. The Justice Department has j long maiataiaed a small lots this spring. The resolutioa voters' say-so in the appointive posts is unprecedented. toner aspirants also j have thsir names on the ballot. fri- State Legislature provid- netod by tte Planting Fall Tomato Crop Well Advanced With the fall harvest season a- bout wound vp, tomato growers of this area are also neariag com- of honors. Danish Merchant Navy pletion of spring crop plantings change of sick and prisoners. In aa adjacent tent. Allied and oner sub-committee, commented: g Tow "It is obvious they are killing! don Star- time, waiting for instructions.'' The communists objected to all six items of the Allied proposal! oa exchanangeprrrsoners. and ig-j officers petitioned sea-loving King Frederifc to decorate "Captain Courageous." The Town Council of his birthplace. Hilleroed. resolved to send him a congratulatory mes- sage. His Danish parents flew to Eng- land to be on hand for a celebra- tion. British seamen planned to give biai an official welcome when he steps ashore. The British press -ofhich has dubbed him "Stay Put Carlsen" and Eaterprise" put its headlmes oa the story. and indicatioas are that the acre- age will run or more acres, according to M. E. Wffiiams, man- ager of the State Farmers Market here. Plaatiag operations should be virtually completed by Jan. 15th If conditions are favorable, the spriag harvest should get wider way the latter part of March or early April. Meantime, the market last week haadied 4.220 boxes of to- matoes that sold at private sale for also, 523 units of cu- -WK.JW, VML> uiil said the Lon- cumbers. S1.840 50- 1 059 Light Fighting oa exchanged prisoners, and ig-: n _ cored a request for immediate ex-1 KSftlAffAllf change of sick and seriously VII UCHIIwlIUHI wouaded prisoners. Schools Gain 39 During Holidays The schools of St Lucie cocatv tbe Coaimnaists Dec. 28, but was gained 39 pupils over the" Christ- on whether the points mas holidays, according to School'west of KorangPO had been fully SEOUL. Korea. Sporadic fighting for outpost hills oa the Jvorean western froat resumed Sat-' to assignment any- newspaper said three of the al- where in the country for special in- ieged traitors were capta vestigations. The committee said shot and one of their bodies______ that this type of activity should! (The first three parts of the ired and burned. be greatly expanded. governor and State Cabinet. Also i_____________ on the ballot would go names of j persons seekmg appointrneat to the i B I It constitutional State Game HPfAIIITAt Fresh Water Fish Commission. I The committee also provided that future assistant state attorneys have their names OB ballots in their respective judicial circuits." The returns would be certified to the governor. Supporters of the Show Big Gain Cairo dispatch were held up by the Cairo censor.) port. To meet the demands of the smaller countries, the proposal for a Security Council sessioa of top importance whenever the council feels it would be the right time was drawn up. This is expected to be introduced in the 60-natioa Political Committee of the Assembly Monday by some of the 11 countries sponsoring a loag resolutioa oa collective meas- ures against aggressioa. The planes were both twin-en- gined craft. They disintegrated ia the flaming explosions of their gas- oline tanks. About 24 men in" all were believed to have been in- Fighting in Suez started Thurs- and the Soviet Bloc is day The British said Egyptian began firing at detach- resolution sarpers ments plant. major clash ia the Suez area since 1 guarding a water filtration supplant Se It developed into the second .The spons the Egyptians tre- Ued collective measures -ae ground that it :curity Council au- sponsors and other del- committee have re- Eussiaa vetoes Fort Pierce bank resources at i Britaia in mid-October and I "J6 Council, aad pointed to the close of business Dec. 31, began trying to throw the British nist aggression ia Korea as a prime j Officers at Burtonwood. one of the largest American Air Force bases in England, said it was a. miracle so many survived. Burned and shock-stricken mea stumbled from blinding flames ia- to the arras of rescue parties. They were taken to the base hos- pital. Names of the victims were with- j held, pending notification of next of km. A U. S. Navy PwV Neptuae plane, known as a "Flying Gun- boat.'' smashed into a U. S. Air Force C-47 Jransport which was :-range anti-submarine re- a gain of aad 972 lima beans, S3.- S74. The total was units and Through the month of Decem- ber, the market had handled 349.- S92 units, nearly all tomatoes, and sales volume bad totaled. Sl.- 749.101.12. according to revised figures. Volume was more than, 200.009 units in excess of the same j period last year and receipts were power on governor in his apixrint- merits. They added, though, that governors who failed to go by re- sults of such preferential primarv votes would be "highly embar- rassed." Frank D. Upchurch of St. Augus- tine, chairman of the committee's resolutioa committee, offered the proposal. Only James Vocelie of Vero Beach, beverage commission- er under Governor Caldwell, and R. L. Hosford opposed it. There were cheers when proponents spoke. Upchurch said the new election code adopted at the last Legisla- ture provided for such a procedure- He said the authority was in sec- tion 103.121 of the code. That part provides stale political party committees can "declare bv resolution of the nomination of candidates for other ihaa elective offices." Sisch procedure, said Upchurch, (Continued oa Page 2) year, according to published state-! 5 Grass Fire Runs ments appeariag in this issue. Deposits totaled S14.9S7.469.S9, aa increase for the vear of 52 832.540. The healthy increase is inter- preted as reflective of the com- munity's favorable business coa- ditioas. Also appearing in this issue is the statement of the Indian River Citrus Bank at Vero Beach, show- ing resources of and de- posits of S7.090.3S3. an iacrease over the same date last year bv S573.795 and that of the First Federal Savings and Loan Association of Vero Beach, showing assets -of S4.- a gain of Fort Pierce Sremea were call- ed to five fires, all of the grass variety. Friday afternoon and Sat- tircay. At Friday afternoon there a call to San Lucie plaza that connaissance and strike aircraft. example of the machinery needed, i T- Debate in the Political Commit- S' K sentung 50 of them to Britain for use fay the SAF Coastal Command. took 25 minutes, one at to North 16th street for 20 minutes. back again to San Lucie plaza around for 25 minutes and j tee on the collective measures droaed through a three-hour ses- sion Saturday and will be continued C of (Directors Map '52 Program Chamber of Commerce direc- aight to Fort Pierce Farms. at a 40- minute run was made to Paradise Park. JACKSONVILLE BEACH John Snyder Carlile, 55. former j I production manager of the Colum- j baa Broadcasting System, died in a Jacksonville hospital today after a brief illness. urday with the Allies reportiag} approximately double. some gains in a three pronged attack. The U. S. Eighth Army reported the attack was intended to reestab- lish advance positions seized by Superintendent D. C. Huskey, A tots! of 80 new pupils enroll- ed during tie 18-day period, whfle 41 withdrew. The largest drawals and number of wita- aew enrollments noted at Fort Pierce elemen- tary, where 15 students dropped oat and 33 new oaes signed tro. Eight withdrew from the "high school and 19 were gained there for a net iacrease of 11. The oaly school which saw more withdrawals than new enrollments the "White City elementary whicfa lost 10 and gained five. !recovered. The three Allied infantry blows, backed by artillery, gained 600 yards each at two points and dis- persed a Red platooa at the other, the Eighth Army reported. Fight- ing began at 5 a. m., and continued all morning against Communists estimated at more than two com- panies (possibly 400 (The North Korean commun- ique, broadcast from Pyongyang, claimed the Allies were hurled back with 800 casualties.) Elsewhere ground activity was light along the 145 mile long Korean front. New School Trustees Take Office .Monday The two new school trustees will take office at the board's first meeting of the year Monday aight at the high school, it was aa- nouaced Saturday. The new trustees are Mrs. Mar- garet Watkins and Bernard Rub- ia. The outgoing officials, who did aot seek re-election, are H. T. Hammer and B. Y. Free. Ralph Hays is the holdover member of the board of trustees. The superintendent, the super- visor, and all priacipals are to be preseat at the meeting. ORLANDO J. Bishop. Jan. 17th To Be Chamber Of Commerce Membership Day Thursday, January 17. has been selected as "Chamber pf Com- merce Membership for 1S52. The Fort Pierce Chamber of Commerce board of directors has decided to conduct an "everv iag of -January 17. A number oi attractive prizes xvill be set up for individual and team accomp- lishmeaL The entire program be preceded by an intensive' rnafl campaign to new nrosnects member canvass" type of one day j The Fort Pierce Chamber of campaign to contact approximate- ly 150 new prospects and all 1951 members vrho have not renewed their memberships for 1952 as of that date, according to an an- nouncement made Saturday. A force of 100 workers divided into five teams of 20 men each will be sought to carry out the whirlwind campaign. The mem- bership day activity will be pre- ceded by a smoker on the even- Orlando attorney and citnis grow ing preceding or a breakfast on Commerce is concluding its most successful year in recent history, according to President H. T. linns, Jr. Not only has the or- ganization been able to carry out almost 100 9i of its extensive pro- gram for work for 1S51 but also it has been able to absorb a big deficit hanging over from 1950 and still conclude 1951 in good financial condition. In a letter mailed recently to the membership, President Enns Henry Robb Injures Hip In Fall Saturday Henry H. Robb was taken to St. Mary's hospital at West Paim Beach ia a Baird ambulaace Sat- urday moraing for surgery after iajariag his hip in a fall frora a ladder. Robb was said to have beea the year 1952. j climbing a fruit tree with the lad- are to be an-jder at his place oa Fort Pierce _ j Farms around Saturday j The chamber concluded the j morning, when he slipped aad feU year 1951 with a surplus of S454. j a short distance. j if was announced. This is the: ______________ first time "in the memory of j Sf 'i j man" that there has been a year- j I, end surplus. The percentage of: Have Left-Over Fund program M j details of which shortiv. defaulted pledges was less j lhaa three per cent-mucn below X. s. c_ Strom the 194S States' Rights Partv f i iLjiavto AtJiiiJici tne national average, it was stat- presidential candidate, says aJjout V 1 S1S.GOO contributed to {hat cam- The chamber authorized resolu- j paigr. wii! be available this vear lions urging easiness people of the j "to help reaffirm Southern ixilin- 1 city to support the Armed Forces i cal independence." (31 blood program here next Wed-1 Tharmoad. a former governor of jsnesday and Thersday: also, urg-i South Carolina who is practicing ing employers to let their era-! law here, said he has "kept the iary. to par- j funds aad ail records relating to X-ray sur- i them since 194S. He said the money ployes off. if accessary ticipate in the mass vey beginaing Jaa. came in too late for tsse in that U. S. Grants India Aid j marked for future use "in 1 same cause." the j TAVERXIER and pri- j vate planes searched the Florida XFW DFT m i- Keys Saturday for a missiag Cana- tural production aad help this often M g" day ,tself and will be follow- said: "Proudly and with day for the State Senate, I ed by a report supper on the even- (Continued on Page 2) NEW FIRINGS Internal Rev- enue Commissioner John B. Dunlap presses his hand to his face in Washington during a news confereace in which Ise disclosed 53 newr firiags or forced resignations from the scaadal-ridden tax collecting service. He said the number of employes fired or forced out during 1951 totaled 166. (AP famine threatened nation feed it- self. The American grant is by far WEATHER .FORECAST: Generally fair and the largest India has received from continued rather warm Sunday, any nation to assist its develop- ment. The gift was made frora Eco- nomic Assistance allocations under the Uv S. Mutual Security Act. It provides for pooling American dol- lars with an equal sum in Indian rupees to form a 100 million dollar India American Technical Coop- eration Fund. except cloudy and unsettled ex- treme north portion. A little cool- er Tallahassee area. Sunday's South Bridge Tides High Low a. m. a. m. p. m. 12.18 p. m. Monday's South Bridge Tides High Low a. m. m. p. m, p. m.   

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