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Fort Pierce News Tribune: Thursday, January 3, 1952 - Page 1

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   Fort Pierce News-Tribune (Newspaper) - January 3, 1952, Fort Pierce, Florida                               NIWt-TftllUNf Lwcw FORT PIERCE NEWS-TRIBUNE Dmily in tht Htmrt River Section" NINTH YEAR. No. 30 ESTABLISHED PSCEMMK U. FORT PIERCE, FLORIDA, THUkSDAY. JANUARY 3, 1952 tt-bour period.Mtdiac today. Max. Min. Rain -1 _ Bar. ._________________ TRUMAN APPEALS TO STEELWORKERS AGAIN Urjes Then To Threat Of New Strike ASSOCIATED "3K3S AP FEATURE SEEVICB Mvrrar Expected To RccmMnend Further Detey In Wmlkout ATLANTIC CITY. N. J. President Truman again appealed to tfce CIO Steelworkers today to caned tkeir threat of an industrv- strike. Mr. Truman, in a message to the opening session of a specially- summoMd union convention, ap- plauded the union's decision io postpone a scheduled New Year's Day walkout and ssked for a per- manent postponement. The convention was called io act on the matter. President Philip Murray of the CIO and the Steel- workers Union was prepared to recommend the further strike de- ity asked by the administration. It was considered probable the line, possibly mid-February. That' London Sees Cool Reception For Churchill SINGLE COPY: i CENTS Russia (n Surprise Armistice Proposal Moscow Move Seen Kickoff Of Economic Drive MORE, BETTER JETS NEEDED IN KOREA LONDON British news- papers are picturing Washington as preparing a cool reception for Prime Minister Winston Churchill for fear he will go home with Aerica's shirt. The independent London Times and the independent Liberal Man- j Chester Guardian both report from i the United States the proposal of 1 SWISS LEADER Dr. Karl :fccKea for major 1952 j Jet pilots need more and better Sen. William Langer (R--SfD that' Kobelt. 60. Radical Liberal mem- almed at dearinS '.he decks for planes" to keep up wiih the gre two warning lanterns be hung in i ber of -he seven-man coaiition 1 an out offensive j "D? Ked air force over Korea. MlG-15s up at once. the belfry of the old North Church federal council has been elect- i aSaiBSt lhe United States, with its "The enemy has a better air-! "In the last war we overwhelmed jin Boston to herald Churchill s ar- ed president of toe Swiss Con- f th.eaier plane and far more than we have." the enemy with our production. rival 1 Ov- Pans Soviet Foreign Minister j said Col. Harrison R. Thyng. His 1 Thyng said, "but now thev are WILLIAM t. RYAN AP Foreign Affairs Analyst Moscow appears todav to have FIFTH AIR FORCE BASE, Ko-. enemy." t rea flyicg colonel vhosej There are never more than SO 1 "boys" have shot down 139 Com- Sabre jets in MIG Alley at one! munist planes said today American time. The Reds, wish a greater force of jets on Manchurian bases, frequently have more than 200 RECOVERING Dr. Chaim Weizmann, 77-year-old president of Israel, was reported to be re- covering in from his rival. "The senator need not really been so worried." cabitd j the Washington correspondent or.; the Times. S "The administration has been 1 hanging out lanterns by the dozen j for the past two weeks. Hardly a i cay goes by without one depart- ment or another providing a little about something it expects Mr. federation for 1952. %-w ujb ui j.trx, A.YIV inim Dis Decent respirator aliment I weakened condition. Stablization Board time to hear and make recommendations on the union's average houriv i pay boost demand. A new strike deadline also would j have the effect, of stimulating the Wage Board to act fast in handling the steel wage case. j MAAff Ulilk A The New Year's Day strike post- f VVIJ iff IIH A ponement was at Mr. Truman's not to get, about some stiff questions he is going to be Gamblers Doing Good Business Returns Show Pans Soviet Foreign Minister I said Harnson R. Thyng. His j Thyng said, "but j Andrei Y. Vishinsky proposed a i Fourth Fighter-Interceptor Wing j overw helming us." I Security Council meeting to bring j Dies Sabre Jets, fastest U. S. plane j "We need more pi about an armistice in Korea. This combat, j Cts neatly into the pattern of So-" j viet diplomatic activity in the past few months. It is tied in with such lanes and better events as Stalin's Year greet inss to the people of Japan, and planes if vve are going" to keep He said greater skill and belter f fighting the MIGs." pljols are5 Ma j. Zane Amell. East Lansing, afraid months JACKSONVILLE viet plans. With the Soviet drive i American team work can effective-1 cross it. Calls For UN Security Coundl To Take Action Proposal Made After Denunciation Of The Western Plan PARIS Russia, fa a surprise move, proposed today that the United Nations Security Council intervene in the Korean armistice negotiations. It asked that both Korea and the lessening of world tensions be considered at a high level, possibly by foreign ir-inisters or chiefs, of state. Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Vishinsky submitted the proposal to the EO-nation Political Commit- tee after a long speech denounc- ing a Western collective action pian, and hinting ominously at events to come in Southeast Asia. The American delegation I Truman Proposal "Eked or some policy thai 7s took in at least S6G3.499 j for the present apparently coacen- 1 b" fight against three or four to 1 "I fee! there will come a dzy I diatelv frovned on the Vishinsky Florida in November, the Bu- 1 trated on Asia. Japan becomes a j on civilian of combined needs. The President's message to the convention, addressed sonaliy to "Dear Phil" Murray, again stressed that "the Sa'd" j wunen lel loose wkh ail proposal. Pending official com- nan- ment. U. S, sources said the So- J viet resolution vras unacceptable, num-! The Americans said that to look the Soviets have veto power in j the Council, it would be useless 22 per-: camps lacing one another on that} tneir have not been Both officers spoke of the Korean to bring the Korean armistice ne- that a ravaged peninsula. able to shoot down man? of the i (Continued on Page 2) as Prime Minister." total 10 per cent tax of j The Soviet proposal for a Se-j ao Roosevelt t Was lurncd m- j curity Council meeting to bring! r the The sa'd n'jd not gone j about an arraistice. if adopted, j j in a state of j I 11 win DC oiiticuit to establish! i Communist plans! Revenue Bureau the same kind of relationship with I ?f Ionguer final figures for elsewhere proceeded apace. At j _ _ ivovpmhpr ars> ti-civt tm> same time it could diminish1 S to be thrust down his throat The Telegra f ington (iha i tion ia i _, J changed since he was last here 1 _d made request to avoid any halt in pro- f traction of the vital metal in view j laUliOUS vilian f j WASHI-CGTON President and there is ao the "Tele- i uTne said not gone sboat an arraisti today Truaian's proposal for "sweeping graph added through all us mail and that it could leave Korea per- reorganization" of the scandal- "It will be difficult to establish I would be the week-end j suspension while C Crawling nation I got a cautious reception on Capitol I President "Truman November are fixed- jthe sanie time it could" diminish C am simply cannot afford a stoppage j today. j dent Roosevelt because Mr. Tru-1 the office orders torn the United States to! OT J'lJaj ______ __ ._. By The Associated Press j in Cape Girardeau. Mississippi, Japan in sight even now, Japan j Western states today are crawl- j Scott. New Madrid. Pemiscot and already faces an economic threat, j out from under the paralysis Dunklin Counties. Telephone and simpiy cannot auora a stoppage itlul looay. dent Roosevelt because Mr Tru- euuesuay, me omce j oraers irom me unuea states to! ia steel production." i In advance of the return of the j man's manner of work and his i had issued 322 tax s'anips in j Japan for goods directly connected "Losses in steel Mr. j main body of Congress members approach to the task of govern-i St-ate' the vast m the] with the Korean War. With the; Truman said, "would have an im- j next Monday, lawmakers ah-eady ment are radicallv different area-_ end of U. S. government aid to mediate and _n in town wprp rffv-iriorl ?n i Upwards Of was bet dur- JaDan In sieht pvpn mediate and crippling effect on j 'n town were divided in their re- mobilization schedules. "Under these pressing circum- stances, the clear obligation of the j action. Few showed any enthus- Alistair Cooke, wriang from New 1 bet dur- York for the Manchester Guardian j n said: gamblers in 22 Northeastern Ohio WMi government corruption! "There may not be as manv! Internal Revenue Union Is to stay at j charges already high on the Re-! dangers in the United States i at reported it had work to maintain full production j Publican list of election-year issues. Sen. Langer would like to think i so far from gam- while their dispute with the steel Mr- Truman made plain his move j but the superstition is verv tens- s Battling inflation, the Japanese of a three-day snowstorm and islands could become a fertile field I subzero spell that marooned motor- for Communist activity. superstition is verv tena- the new tax. gam- i There was an ominous note to- day in the Paris remarks of VI- zation Board. "The obligation of the steel com- j panics is to maintain normal work I "In addition to the reorganization j the and prodacnon schedules and to Bureau of Internal Rsve-1 cious that an incoming Briton The Sambling tax returns whose remarks of late ever seedV and barefoot on arrival Colorado have been from punch- j e hsd the quality of veiled idustry is before the Wage Sta-i was Dut the first of a "series of rinne The only o insure honesty. Integritj jess" in Washington. dition to the BIllil. VL nosl _______________, __________-I "And the-thought of Mr Church- bookmakers, policy- j ierrying Kationalist Chinese troops lay the full facts in the case be- ntje." he said. "I expect to take Ill's resuming the .makers other professional gam-1 into the Southeast Asia countries- tax has totaled prophecy. always leaves for home wearing T> u x- I t-n. sUk shirt Ms only S76.23. Collector Ralph He accused the United Stales of fore the board. further administrative "The obligation of both parties to make other recommendations power line officials estimate the damage will run into millions. At least a dozen towns were without power and light Wednesday. to maintain the status i i under Congress to Insure U16 operations of the gov- great numbers of Republicans eminent. e r 01 Mr. Truman's statement was j dined to comment j followed quickly by the disclosure One British official their collective bargaining agree- ments while the case is before the board." The WSB has set an initial hear- j lag in. the case for next 3 in and Murray told reporters he expects there. This comment from Murrav announcement, which covered the alone seemed Insurance enough that the union olans BO Imminent steel strike. the U. S. would refer to this i first 10 months of last year. IS'O Frost In Sight This made the total for the year 166. compared with 40 in and One-Way Street Plan h Proposed A one-way street plan designed to improve congested traffic con- ditions in the downtown area was suggested to the city commission i Wednesday night by Commission-1 er E. C. Coiuns. Collins said the suggestions! DfKf flltAC tentative and that no doubt j VJM lifVJ some revisions might be neces- sary. He and Police Chief John- ny Norvell have been studying the matter, he added, and the sug- merely laid before The Newark. N. J.. Internal Rev- office said it had received return under the new! i law. and that was 'less than S100." The Internal Revenue office in Indianapolis said Indiana gam- Federal- j biers had paid in S59.112.SS. about Service said i half of. what the bureau exnects' today there would be no frost dan-1 evenuially in Peninsular Florida through j Upwards of S163.S52 w as bet dur-1 w" !inS November v-ith "about 10" i J.ne morning bulletin said to-j professional gamblers in the 26 Bus Company Seeks Increase Ists, tied up rail traffic and took three lives in Colorado. Another two are missing after the cab of a semi-trailer was swept off saov.-- packed Wolf Creek Pass in South-! western Colorado. j Rescuers Wednesday aight used 1 snow-plows, sleds and snowshoes' io bite through S-foot-deep banks of snow and rescue 21 men ma- rooaed for more than five davs In 10-000-foot Cumbers Pass on the Mexico border- New Mexico, most of Texas and the South Plains j Pening at the much-Investigated Texas Is locked in the I Reconstruction Finance Corpora- grip of an Ice storm. Telephone ition. (RFC) again claimed the at- Cdmcnitteemen Said Keeping An Eye On RFC WASHINGTON is hap-1 dottn..to sanctions-in other >ninn words, war. gotiations to that body, addinjt that the place for successful con- clusion of such talks is in Korea, with the veto-free" General Assem- bly deciding later on a political settlement. Vishuisky proposed that the Council be called under Article 28 of the U. N. Charter v.hich au- thorizes governments to send chiefs of state or foreign minis- ters as delegates to such Council meetings. This made the proposal look like another version of the U. S. S. R. demand keynote of its current peace for a five-power meeting. including Tied China, to bring about a pact of peace. The Soviet suggestion was of- fered to counter the ll-powcr cnut calling upon the U. N! to set up new- anti-aggression machinery- oeiiv- ered a 37-page speech Senounefcg- the Western draft as one that could lead only to war. He said the American-sponsored proposal i It 1016 10 I DC calls out of Lubbocfc in West Texas were expected to be on an emer- tention of senators todav. Sen. Fulbright who i the big government lending In that speech. Vishinsky hinted at things to come in Asia. He ac- cused the U. S. of ferrying Chi- troops into Viet- New- Mexico. An estimated meanwhile, were freed w hen high- Sunrise Transit Co.. opera- connecting Utah's Unitah in 1S49. Of the 1951 total. 20 i are suspensions, still under inves- tigation. i Congress members for the most part reacted to the President's ra- j organization plan with attitude. Some go far enough. Some haps It went too far respects. Ren Byrnes A i said he hoped'it wasn't a "smoke I cooler in In Tennessee S85.S20.70 in wa- j slon Wednesday night for permis- dangerously i trenie norm i? nday. Thirty minor 1 on highways in that area. The cold and banking subcommittee extends as far v est as Central I are "watch very closely" r nii _i ii_. T i ooutnem China. ;ency basis only Thur-day because headed the orig-ial Senate probe fof M of ice on wires. Thirtv minor of lhe government lending K These wrecks were reported on highwrc told a reporter that mem- -H in -tj I bers of his scnbed as defensive when "Mil- 1-000 persons. begin against all changes at the higher levels of RFC management. j His curiosity was aroused bv the i OI Aofean War- av the WhitP Communists cnarged that way the White House handled the This called to mind the begin- of the Korean War. when the the U. (Continued on Page 3) Safety Program R. J. Weaver, known affection- ately by the school children of! j Para-Pooch Teddy In 1A Narrow Escape TOKYO the j pooch, almost made his last jump today. gers were recorded and not all j sson to make the increase, stating were returns had been processed. that the company has made no In Phoenix. Ariz., the internal profit during its oiseratlcns here, i ..-o ._-juiic-_iiiig ULdllK Uniian----- ii.muicu uic j __- with Salt Lake Citv were sudden departure from RFC of ML aggressor, and tne Chi- opened. They had been isolated I p.eter J- Bi.kowski. who has been DCse in since Saturday. Trucks reached i 2 mafi to W. Stuart Symington region Wednesday night, bring- ln a housecleaning of the agency. ia food supplies which had ran j Symington himself Is reported low. Coal supplies i by rp-aWe sources to have asked nese intervention in Korea, when a similar charge was made. Vishinsky touched only briefly on the point, without elabortfcng on his meaning. reported short in Dachesne President Truman for permission j oosevelt, Utsh. j {o resign and return ;r> private i storm moved through Kan- We- Revenue oface reported it had col- that the 15-cent fare is in line i sas and Missouri and a damaging Symington and Bukowski went j where I ice blanket virtually isolated all j EFC Jast summer to become the 1 ___ __ ._ _i_J ____ ._ f 3 J--------" T- 
                            

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