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Washington Post Newspaper Archive: May 26, 1922 - Page 1

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   Washington Post, The (Newspaper) - May 26, 1922, Washington, District Of Columbia                                WASHINGTON POST: FRIBAY, MAY 26, 1922f TESTIMONY FOR TANLAC GROWS Each New Test Here. Shows .Remarkable Power of Master Medicine. The' list of testtmonials in ber of the merits of Tanlac Krtiwa dally Aa new tests of Its powers are made- Carl S. Corn-ad, 1807 Eijrhtb St. N.W.. Washington, D. C.. made tne following statement a few days ago: _ "I have heard lots about Taplac here of 'ate, but I never had any it was so wonderful until I. tried it myself. It has done all I cciuUl ftsk and much more than I expected it would For two montha past I have been losing cntrfry and strength and going down hill at n pretty rapid rate. In. fact my whole system seemed of order and I felt tired, wjak and played out all the time. My appetite left me, my stomach was a IT wronpt, and as for eating, I would Just nibble at a little food onoe or twice a day. I had not enjoyed a hearty meal In months, anil simply had to force myself to In fact, I was having. skip a few day.-i from work now and then trying to recuperate. In this run-down condition I was laid up with the grippe for ten days anil had just about reached my limit. "Ko many ot my customers kept talking about Tanlac every day that 1 concluded to Rive it a trial and now I am ready to go on record an saying I believe it the best med- icine ever sold in a drug store for a condition like I suffered from. Tanluc helped me right from the start anel a weeks treatment has me feeling aa good as I ever did in my life. It's a sure when you take Tanlac you can't IcoVp from eating. It has given me an' appetite as keen as a razor and" has put my. stomach in apple-pie order, too. I feel as brisk and now 'as an athlete, for my .system has been toned up until I am in great shaps. There's nothing top good I can say for dull, dragging feeling of the body, a sluggish mind, lagging memory, depression of spirits, ner- vousness. Irritability, pains in the stomach, sides and kidney region, headaches, dizziness, stomach trou- ble and indigestion are among the numerous symptoms of a condition from which a large number of peo- ple suffer. Tanlnc proved of groat benefit to .Mr. Conrad because it contains c.er- taln medicinal properties which combat those very troubles. Thou- arc; now using this famous medicine In all parts of the United States and Canada, as well as" in .Mexico, and scores of testimonials art: being received daily from men and women of unquestioned integ- who express deep gratitude as a result of having found such a Kreat source of relief. Tanlac sold in Washington'by the Peoples Drug Stores and all leading iHE most expensive thing can do is to at- tempt to operate your A u t oruoblle without' adequate I n s u r ance protection. It's unbusi- nesslike and 'sary {or Insurance costs little compared with the, relief it gives case damage! and in the satisfaction of knowing you won't have to stand matter what happens. There are some things about our Auto- mobile Insurance serv- ice that are worth knowing. Yours for the asking. Phone Main 601-602. LeRoy Mark, Inc. Colorado Building. finahotdin MOLLE -MO-LAY- M wobrush nombbinfcin Aj st spread MOLlE over the face lihe acoidcieamand COLDS GRIP Fortify the system ajainst Colds. Grip and Influenza by taking laxative FtioagOe. Lloyd George's Explanation and Defense Of His Policies at the Genoa Conference Quinine tablets which destroy germs, act as a tonic laxative, and Keep the sys- tem in condition, to throw off attacks of Colds. Grip and In- fluenza, Be sure you get BROMO Tha genuine bean thla signature j ..London. May 25 (By the Associated -r-In speaking of the posstbU- j ity of the roarmlngr of Russia with I German assistance, Premier liloyd George said in the commons today, emphasising' each word: "I hope the' may never arise maklnc H 'necessary to go back and refer to- Ithe warning I am utterinff." I Loud cheers greeted the prime mln- I later when ho entered the house this .afternoon for a debate on the foreign policies ot the government, wrhlch likely to have an Important bearing upon his political future. The Genoa .conference formed the text for the debate, with the premier ready to point to Us achievements, such, as the agreement (or a truce and the economic results reached, and his opponents havlnff fop one thp Russo-Gernian treaty the for criticisms of the happenlnge at Genoa. Reviews Mr.- Lloyd George in beginning his speech said he purposed dealing only with the business of the Genoa gath- ering and did not intend to discuss Gorman relations or British relations with France, an opportunity for dis- cussion of which would be provided next The prims minjster, after reviewing. the objects of the said that in regard to the Question whelh- er the conference had succeeded he would simply etate the facts fairly and let the members Judgre them fafr- ly. Although peace had been estab- lished ivi Kurope, it was quite clear, said Mr. Lloyd George, that the war atmosphere to a certain extent re- mained. As for Russia, it wjiis hopeless ter- her, whatever her sovernment. said the premier, to expect to extricate herself from the pit of squalid misery without the assistance of the other1 30 nations.. Three Ways to Treat There were three alternatives In dealing- with the Russian situation. Mr. Lloyd George pointed out. The first was force, which had failed. No one. had suggested that at Genoa. The second was to leave Russia to her fate. "But he "could we In' sure Europe against ttie risks this policy woulcj Involve? The Russo- German agreement shows the sort of peril i mean." Germany, said the premier, could not re-equip Russia economically, not having th.e capital, but that was not the case with arma- ments, as there was every natural rei source in' one country, and complete technical skill in the other. "The British he said, "realized- that it was necessary for the peace ef the world, whatever was thoug-ht of the soviet that sojne arrangement with Russia be made in order to enable her to help herself in swelling the volume of trade on which so many millions de? pend and in order to give a. sense of stability and security, to Europe." Program at The Hagrve. The Russian leaders, said the pre- mier, quite realized they -were .not- going to get .credit from 'wie west upon a basis of confiscation and repu- diation of debts. They also knew that Russia never would ba restored. until she got credit. 'As regards; debts of money advanced to Russia before the revolution, he said, the Russians were Prepared to compro- mise. saying the obligations they" ac- cepted would depend upon the as- sistance received. Ha said The Hagrue conference was to be R practical dis- cussion between the experts on' the basis of the Cannes resolution. "I am very he said, "that when they come down to examination of practical propositions something- will be achieved." the he "we have had to consider -what could done in order to prevent conflict In Europe. If we were to. continue the Genoa examinations we had to insure the peace of Europe. That Is why we have the truce of peace, which embodies the solemn declaration on the part of 34 nations that they will be guilty of no act of aggression against each other. Instability of Exufjhanvea. "I am not. going.'tp say that Genoa will ultimately su.cc.eed, I believe It has accomplished treat things al- ready. If Genoa falls the 'position of Europe will indeed be tragic." -I The premier said he believed If such a.coriference as the Genoa gathering had' been held "In 1914 the world would have been spared expert-. ence'ofMhe'world war. The' attainment, of.- normal condi- tions in Europe, he said, had been Im- peded by numerous the re- m'oval of which was the the I conference. The first of these wag currency difficulties and the InstablK ity of the second was cus- toms and trading; v the I third, transport difficulties, and the fourth was the absence a sense of security against war. He said com- missions were established to deal with' each of these problems.- _ situation. It V-is f >r Which of the'three we vr'f it a. T -whir-'. J thrae was po.iglbfp. There wasflrn" alt recourse to .force, which had Y.f tried, and failed, but' which weal Hpver Genoa. .The'sec- I twis to jfavp io-'her, until Bhe Jiftd more beneyojetrt and acceptable dorrilnlon, afiS tiif 1 third what I have proTiounJy t scribed to the bongs M the Pitt 'policy. estFv.w flrst, nont cuspert and none Wffeested It, I come to- which may be driven to aaopt, that we should leave Russia to her'fate until Khe changes. None put" policy forward at Genoa, ftnd If we with it now it would beofljiiM was the. only policy left If third did liot succeed. If you lef t to Uneif, sBsuwlnfr.that this government should ars; what It question of a more ejtrem? munlst orgnnlBAtfon of a militarist Is any one ready to Insupe' the peace of Bur rope tinder that The prime minister alluded Here you he said, "two the of whether regarded In territory latlon or .resources, both each of having do which discredited with the nations of the world and each no- received info th.e fuU society ol nations. Peace with nom- Inal equality. 'but there was a the inferlo: There was commwlty nilsfprtunt. ft ecjmmVinUy pf and community d as maltreatment. difficulty of on com- B. The discredited. that h wants the of this mlfeht ripen w ship. What did tlwt meanT G ?r disarmed, end nee. MHT -ym could disarm stW Its one thins you can net IB prevent these natlond are driven to Haven "Germany could net reeijulp economically, not tlje.' but that is: not the case with mcnts, as there is Only One of 'the unfortunate of i the war, which had demonstrated the1 >pawer..of. international wlllrwas that it should have- developed into narrow, selfish, blind nationalism that was found in every direction. The human intellect was exhausted In order to make trade as difficult as possible, he added. peace has been estab- lished in Europe, it is quite clear" continued the premier, "that the. war atmosphere has to a Certain extent remained. While the conference was sitting troops were marching toward the frontier. There is an atmosphere in Europe of International suspicion of impending conflict. v ''The problem naturally exciting the most controversy was that of Rus- sia. There sat around that table the representatives of 34 nations. Over there safthe Russian delegation, rep- resenting more human poverty, wretchedness, desolation, hunger, tilenco, horror and despair than all the nations represented around that table, Thla is the first fact to realize. Tha other is that it Is hopeless for Russia, whatever her government, to expect to extricate herself from the pit of squalid misery without the assistance of the other 30 nations." Pays Tribute -to Mr. Lloyd Georgre paid tribute to' the Russians as a galla-nt, loyal and patient people, capable of greater heights of unselfish devotion' than al- most any race In the world, as demon- strated during the first two or three years of the war. but nlao accus- tomed for generations to ruthless, re- lentless authority and a people who could be very formidable to their neighbors. It was no use questioning the situ- ation. said the premier. There In the conference sat. the men who repre- sented the unchallenged masters f6r the time being of that formidable and very distressed people. Peace or war with Russia could, only be made with them; and whether Russia should march forward .or .retrejjt with- Its men under arms 'today, or whether the -she ;has In re- serve. should march tomorrow question. them v "That was the flrst fact you had to fiet firmly into your mind beforo you began -the business of Mr, Lloyd George declared, 'premier spoke 'slowly, emp.ha. each word of the by in front he went on, "can not be .excited, to hopes or fears by the of ins years henee. It Is the ot statesmen to Ipok Is why I am appealing to the ihat has the, responsibility on behalf of a great nation and empire. slbillty not weTely for that emplr J. but a responsibility which the whole of Europe, to as to tho danffers In the posslbllltlos and to provide ahead, "The British delegation realised, it was necessary for the peace of the world, whatever was thought ot the. soviet government, that aome ar- rangement with Russia was necessary In order to. enable Russia to Dwelling the volume of .trade on whlcn so many millions depend, In order tb give a of stability and se- curity to, Europe, and, it above In order to avert those evM? which lurk In the future If Ji done to set straight this mlaunderstandlnijf In For that reason the British deleffatlon tho -whole of our strength and imnan to. fight the battle world-: "HusBlft needed and custom- ers, and we needed her .produce. seemed very simple. There was her neftd and here was our supply. was a eeller there was a nuyelrs Bit when yeu came to deal with tt you found chasm deep. Wide and possible. "The first. question was could chasm be filled was could It be Bridged. That la problem, and a enftneerliMT problem tt is; because you have to nnd foundations for the piers of yowj hrldce In a shifting channel and on s, scale al- ways carry in their tyain of..property, and sorry to Without and ;'that''ls. lutlonary obllsraUons. with her repudiation 'and confiscation. Rolnff to the very people whose they, refuse'to pay and 'whole prop- erty confiscated, and 'Ijend me "They 'are practically for credit froijn Russian', realise Whatever they. they, certainly are 'tne.n1 of ;ablllty. men knowledge: ot the world, and they -know perfectly well they a'ro- jiot' In. tjie. PH basil; of conrtacatlon and repuaiatSoiv'oit dab'ts. rroponej Meet Clalnan. "With refffl-rd to the debt of Russia before the revolution, they were pared to acknowledge those debts .and were .prepared arrangements for the repayment of them, but they said was us to -'pay ..now -.or pay Interest la to aslc; its for thins; that would be qutto Impossible for us or anyone else to 40. Until nusala is: restored can pay. nothinar.' 'That is quite true. Therefore, they "'Any obligations, we enter Into will depend upon, the assistance you give us. Before wo can tell you what moratorium we shall feijntro must know, of all, what you are pre- pared to do in order to put Russia on i soynd economic -was a for discussion, and' there was no chal- lenge of principle. The first came with -the claims put forward by the soviet government for tion for ruin wrought In the country In the war. They put forward a I think, for of for damages. done In various parts of Russia.- We bad to tell them we would not acknowledge that claim under any circumstances. "We were prepared to'- talte lijtq ac- covint the fact that RusBla was dam- aged durlnifthe war, and we agreed that whlje we not admit any liability we were -willing, owing to ''the serious economic condition lit Russia, to write down claims for money advanced by the government to Russia during the war. "The reply of the Russians not wholly satisfactory. But the whole of tbe powers concluded U wae good enough to proceed with dlscusslonst When you come to the question of loans to Russia In the tnere no question ef principle dividing parties When, yojj came to property; the dlvlma -was much. "Our claim rMpwrtlBf WM framed. In the V- of the ablest Jurla P -i-- French, ono British 8 drAfted view of the restoration or the. -principle of ejvfv cfv-. governm'ept. The Belgium tlon was that property .should be re- stored If materially- possible. ;rThat not the view 'of reso- the only dlfforpnce- with Beigluw-afterward, not from agreement, but rather out ot general with fleifcium. JO their document of ,11? -went bacft> their previous .position. 'Betwceh-the con- versation at May I There 1? no doubt that thert liad been a., great struggle In Russia between tho prac- Meal statesmen -of -the: aitreme side Gibbon i auctioneer, y.es- f public iuetion f pr and iiotjth street, i The pur- l was received. ''LoD -Then when were in there shouia no 'reflected !-Jrt jf the Talk opinlen. ih; ;which-ls-jiot the opinion it the' masses people, :qnt of InoUTertnt to this iyatem and; .hostile to U., .The only there that matters.la. .tJte pinion of ihe workmen. In, tlio towni, wh> represent I Wnt whole pcftulatiott jpvfet-iiystem. is not i of '-It-la -peasant proprlttarX. that ?5 ly: is Manfl -And has It, But let tsry te it, tt-te M- much- peWHJht tfrfMrfc the- titles written.1 .osifc .-ir-tnld--. the aiw and it; -Thev ftasstan 'w.e, f-. lijtic than .'the. people You -have tHo cMnmunls- of an indty Wu TO GAS RATE Council Passes Bill for J .90 Discount Allowance. DEFERS ACTION ON LICENSES Will 1ft AJlbwed to Entertains Business Wi an ordi- nance adopted reflunMiS tb.e price of fca frini 13, with "a Discount of 'e'ents arthausand. prompt pay- ment, to a 'thousand with n cents thousand t tor witHIri; ftayis, from the ot 'thi, >JJV; to the was Coiin tfto O cent, On for p -petition gtevens Cameron and -Cueon streets. r that -if irsKes, which  t of" ig9vernment, which becomes ert.eetlve September Ii: This list. is.dated Decernber'ia, 1921, which WHS the Jaat date on which voters, could qualify for this election. Since that about- BOO additional have quallfled and wjll he: entitled to vote in the November sen-' election, The large Increase In the qualified' ,11st-is .saflsea by the addition ofrthe. women have qualified in- land mjnibeFS In every ward of the city.; The ;vote of. the white women is almost to that of the the former and the letter The total colored Vote male, lenialer 2B9.1 V.> lir in the city''sire 'voters this ifo 'the JBTrst they 88 Woitoir Church Aeeompjuiht. yThfr younff'mejh of the sihff Inif. djass the fiecond Pseabyterlan clniroh KavA preseivted. Martha Allison a {fold .pfece -in "token of their ap- Tvork as 'iccompan- resentBtlpn was by hOrter, ('vice president, of at-.their regular choir prac- C.. AVord. Wfes recfrlyed. In :Alexandrjii tjhe1' 'deatlh in -an .i at.the time of hfs w "B. _ Hujch. HerfurthT Jr., and. wlife have sold "to" Mips fhomson 'tiiree 4f 16 or 60 decreased power murk old Bgc. To some Jt comes ot Bo fit at or iclepco will keep you Joung. Bat AJnacnds foraboundlnj health, glandt. They aro unique and piquant to end rich in all known TUnmlni. In IOC end packsgrcs; atflfrocers and druggists-everywhere. ;ypur money back if not If your dealer them, send ua big name you a generous sample.- Vitwln Gt. CMlHUB Mattmut Baak BUf. Ycrk HOUSE ISTH.STRBBT AT L Siumner In Washing- ton will find at Hoiaw a of rivaled onljrin their own bomci. v, In pur pining Room we m fratuHng a d'hote Dinner at A vim fa providcd.that wul appeal to WM room and bath pet day. and nonitily months. la, will, .deliver a Jecturc; pn: "The That WUr 'save. Irig; 'Sunday 3 auspices .tfte Se'eond Presbyterian church, and, men, women and chil- dren afe "'invited to attend. '.In the eV6.nins Mic'tJpshur 'Will oe- Second .church, "..his: subject being the at 'his street, .of -Si> m. deavors of senior Class olf .oooni -The., play wm. he siyen" In audltoriHm toniEBt'and row Koontz died fiay- morning. at 'hef 2OT No'rth Royal street, after a lonsr ill- She Is survived by her husband. The body was taken to Wheatley's establishment. She was a mennber of l.lber'ty lodge of Odd Pellowa. The funeral arrange- ments have not yet been made. "CY" CTTMltiBdS IS RACE. Maryland Legislator Aspires to .A. J. "Cy" Cujnmlngs yesterday filed papers, as a candidate lor mem- beif of Congress from the Sixth Mary- land district on Democratic tick- et. Mr. 'Cu'mAingw 'said last riiBht that he7 expected to have little or no for the Demo.cratic nomi- nation. f For four terms Mr.. CuinminBS has represented his -district in the land lesisluture'. Tho district Includes Montiromery, Frederick, Alleghany an.d Gerrv CEEAL The Meal Health Food tiott and mucous colitis due thereto; should be parfeof daily diet. <3ooi4 for children and -grown people 2-Pound Carton, 90c Groceries Conn. Ave, and K St. Famous Caramels One Store, 9lh and G charm if allowed liecome loiled or bad- ]r mmsed or wrin- OhUroh frttn SEED sossnsvf--- May 211. tile ewat reprodnetloa of Dumbarton's great cocUl miMCSs of fifteen aso, will Mart. -The "Ba.v seed 8oabalTl (iren tor two rea'scsj; ta'B sll the folks to- f aot malie for a fppd fiapKf, Uaiqae and a .pro- gram of annwwt Interest. Ileal 5IB1UODI8T Ice cream for sale. Let ex-cnr Cburch -and Sunday School mem- 1 do their share tfie SUCCCEI of the r- YOU: will; bcf host at the table d'hote 'iiuyief served i at- the New Willard Coffee Shop- lavite anyone you kaow: with perfect ognfidcnce. :and therdcft, dkinty-vwiyit is rais.es the five course meal far above' teble d'hote. 'Tin 'dottier 'Served frtm it S.jo. P., M. If You Would Entertain Tiu Wilfarii Coffee Sbvp .is when may ht in a JtKgktfitl way and New Willard COFFEE SHOP NBW WILLAR.D HOTEL FRANK S. HtGHT, JtCen. 4 7th AND WEBSTER STS. Adjoining St. Gabriel New Catholic Church Take 9th St. Car to Varrium St; N.W. and Walk East 2 Squares Box "Rooms Deep and Comer with Garage All Houses Open for Inspection All Houses Sold on Monthly Payments Force Your House to Pay: for Can Easily Rent Second Floor for Enough to Mate Monthly Payments H. R. CO. -1314 F APARTMENTS 1424 Sixteenth Street N.W. High-Grade Housekeeping Apartments 8 Rooms, 3 Baths and Porch Now Available Open for Inspection H Thomas J. JFisher Company, Inc. S Rental Agents 1 738 Fifteenth Street N.W. For Graduation your boy or girl tgat (them fll tfitar a Corona typewriter. down. Easy monthly payments. CORONA TYPEWRITER 724 iStfc Sf. N, W.. IK. JMAIL THIS -I am mvemtfA in Corona. iflfecmatiaa, with- SPECIAL NOTICES YOUR. FLOORS: CLBAKED highly- ,arfy: Jjoir; Franjc. BTJStNESS MAJT'OP EXECTTms jast :locatSns In Washington, ironld likft to make connection Ttifh. large inannfsotprtoir or business-concfe'mT-where results coariit: So Jws, sfiedalized-isioffice manasemeDt, bandlinjr men. developing new territory and cxpanaing business; i tory personal interview prompt- ly upon request: not afraid of long hours or hard work. Addrtsa Box 4S8; this oHSce..'. Tordi rockers, splinted npboleterlnx; wort called tea. tat -dellTered. AHMSTBONO'S. 1233 N.. FBANSLIN NOTICE-.IS HESBBY-XJIVEN THAT clal of tie sbarcholderg ol Riggi Jfatlonal Bank of D. cr be. held on ilJNE 1822. at o'clock p, tot the purpose, of voting on a rwoln- tfpn .ratlfTlnj and cdnflrmlBi -the action board of directors .of the Rlggs in entering .into an-agreement with the board of directors of the Hamilton National Bank of prorldlng for cost (olldatlon of .those 'two associations trader charter- and title of "The Siggt NaUoiuit of C. NOTICE ffi HEBEBY GIVES SHAI A clal meeting of the shareholders of tfce Hajn- -iltou Katlnnal Banlc of Washington will be held OB JUNE p? purpose :qf.voting 'da, ratifying and action of the- board-'of Directors of the .BamHton Katiooal-BaBk'in enuring into HgnemeAt- 'tie board of directors ot 'ffie Klssi National Bank Ot Wanhllieton, D, C., proTidfttg for a. consollfls- -lion of those associations jinder tie char-''? I ter title' of The -Blgss SPECIAL NOTICES .Cl.- HOSKINSOK. .Caahlar. McReynoWs L St. N; W. Auto Enameling -.1 Slip Cooerinf EPAIRING AND PINTING Beofiu Dep wtment. ra. K. 231-23J   

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