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   Washington Post, The (Newspaper) - August 5, 1905, Washington, District Of Columbia                               Waahington business men advertise la The Post because it is the paper the people of Washington read. cloudy to-day, pMfeftUjr to-morrow, fair; Htfit -winda, moatly wnthetly. NO. WASHINGTON: AUGUST 5, PAGES. THREE READY FOR ENVOYS Pomp and Ceremony Will At- tend To-day's Greetings. GUNS TO BOOM SALUTES Russians and Japanese to Meet on Board the Mayflower. IFotable Demonstration Is Expected in Eonoi. of the Distinguished Guests. Buffet Luncheon to Be Served, Thus Avoiding Perplexing Questions of Pre- cedence that Would Attend the Seating of Embarrassment. Oyster Bay, N. T Aug. 4 ar- rangements were completed to-night for the reception by President Roosevelt of the Russian and Japanese peace envoys to-morrow The reception, which will be a formal greeting to the representatives of the belligerent powers by President Roosevelt on behalf of the United States take place on the cruiser Mayflower, the finest vessel of her class to the navy It will take place at 1.30 p na and will be attended by a notable demonstration in honor of the distin- guished guests of the country who have been designated by their emperors as their representatives to the Washington peace conference. The President and the State and Navy Departments will unite to extend a cor- dial greeting- to the plenipotentiaries and to facilitate in every way their mission of peace Every honor due to their rank will be paid to the envoys and the cordiality of the greeting by the President on behalf of the Ameiicau people will leave nothing to be desired. Mayflower Casts Anchor. The cruiser Mayflower arrived here and cast anchor in the Jower bay early this afternoon She is in command of Com- mander Cameron McR. Wlnslow, the President's naval aid and carries a full complement of 260 men Her interior fur- nishings are beautiful and she has been specially fitted for this occasion It is expected that the Sylph, the Pres- ident's naval yacht with Assistant Sec- retary Herbert D Peirce and some of the guests Invited to the reception of the envoys wiU arrive to-morrow morning Secretary Peirce, who, in the absence of Secretary Root, will represent the De- partment of State, accompanied by his guests, will go aboard the Maj flower about noon He will be accompanied by Rear Admiral Charles D Slgsbee, as a representative of the njtvy, p-nd Gen. Frederick I) of the of Bast, a representa- tive of the arrfjy The Russian and Japanese plenipoten- tiaries and their suites Will leave New Yoik to-morrow morning, the Japanese at 9 o clock and the Russians at 10. TUe departure will be from the foot of East Tw entj-thiid street The envoys and their suites will make the trip to Oyster Baj In sisier cruisers, the Chattanooga and the Tacoma Arrival of the Cruisers, Thus they will not meet until they reach here and are formally presented to the President of the United States The bruisers are expected to arrive in- the outer bay that bearing the Japanese about 11 45 o'clock and that bear- ing the Russian plenipotentiaries an hour or so later President Roosevelt will go aboard the Maj flower at 1 o clock He will be greet- ed with a Presidential salute of twenty- cne guns from the Mayflower as he goes aboard, and his pennant will be broken out at the forepeak 4.s soon as his flag is ed, the Japanese plenipotentia- ries Baron Jutaro Koraura, minister of toreigrn affairs, and Kogoio Takahira, Minsner of Japan to the United States, and their suite will proceed to the May- Co wer in launches from, their As the> go over the side a. salute of nine- teen guns will be flred in their honor, the crew will dress ship, and they will received on deck by Commander Wins- lew and his officers in special full-dress They will be escorted to tno handsome main cabin, where Assistant Secretary -will present the envoys and each member of their suite to the President Such exchanges as may be made at the time -will be purely informal In turn the envoys and other members of the special mission will be presented to the guests of the President on board the ship Presentation to the President. At the conclusion of this ceremony the Russian plenipotentiaries, Serglus Wilte, president of the committee of ministers, end Baron Rosen, the Russian Ambassa- dor to the United States, accompanied by their suite, will board the Mayflower and tn the same formal manner received and presented to the President The envoys of the two powers will be presented formally to one another, when an effort will be mad-e by President Roose- velt and Secretary Peirce to render the ceremony as natural and easy as possible, in order to eliminate any embarrassment These ceremonies concluded, a luncheon will be served In order to avoid any un- usual questions of precedent, the lunch- eon will be a buffet collation. Thus will be avoided the seating of the guests at table with the President The party In attend- ance at the luncheon will number about 25 Shortly after the luncheon. President Roosevelt will take leave of the envoys, and will return to shore in a launch. His pennant will be lowered, and another will be fixed as he leaves the ship's From the Mayflower the Japanese en- voys and their suite will he conveyed to the dispatch boat Dolphin, which will be anchored neaar-by, the Russian envoys and their suite remaining on the Mayflower On these ships the two sets of envoys will be conveyed to Portsmouth, N. H, where the sessions of the peace confer- ence are to be held. Soon after the de- parture of the guests the Mayflower and Dolphin will weigh anchor, and start on their journey, convoyed by the crulset Galveston. WOBEIED OVER DTDICTMENT. Reason Ascribed! for the Suicide of Edi- tor of thw Wrw Ywker. Special to Tie Wartingfon Post. New York, Augr of Bobert Crlswell, editor of the New Yorker and of the chief directors of the Social Editors' Society, who committed suicide by lumping In front of a subway train Thursday night, said that they be- lieved, he killed himself because of worry over the charge of criminal Ubel made against Mm by Representative Joseph Rliinocb, of Kentucky. CrisweU's friends declare that they do not think he was worried by the district attorney's Investigation of CrisweiVs con- nection -with "America's Foremost Fami- for which more than J6.000 has been collected In subscriptions. Assistant District Attorney Krotel eaid to-day. "There was no other charge than the one for criminal libel pending against Criawell -it la true that we had making a pretty thorough Investigation of 'America's Foremost in the course of that investigation well amd Robert A. Irvine had been ques- tioned An exatnina.tion of the books of 'America's Foremost Families' showed that over had been collected --ajid practically nothing paid for getting oilt the book The money went to Crlswell and Irving and two solicitors, A. De Wald Bloom and Jjeo M Morris- "Criswell -was expected here to produce books we had) not examined, but he did not show up. The next day bis lawykr brought ime a letter from. Crfs- wjell, who said that if the books were removed from tlie office it would hurt his business, but that I could look at them there. I sent Detective Flood, but he found no tangible evidence.. It is true that we were thinking of starting crimi- nal proceedings, but we had no complain- ant. Jackson Wallace might have been a complainant, he got back the he put up Alexander H Wray, one Criswell's friends, seemed to think that Criswell was mentally unbalanced Robert A Irving said that Criswelli had been subject to fits at vertigo, but that he had no finan- cial worries or family troubles. TAKES HIM ON PROBATION Mayor Weaver Selects Unknown En- gineer for Highway Bureau. J. A. Hunter, Urged by His Wife to Try the Civil Service Examination, Sur- prised Himself and' Others. WITTE AT OYSTER BAY. Broad Shouldered) Russian Has Pleasant Meeting with President. Special to Tne Washington Poet. Oyster Bay, N T., Aug. 4 is a the President was re- ported to have said of M. Wltte after the envoy left Sagamore Hill. The President CONTINUED FOURTH PAGE Mo Safer Storage Obtainable Than that offered by the storage depart- ment of Union Trust Co. Movingvpacking, and shipping. Main office, 1414 T at. nw. Pa August 4 was an- nounced to-dav that J A. Hunter, who was an applicant for the vacant position of chief of the bureau of highways, has been appodnted to the place on probation by Mayor "Weaver, and will enter upon his duties 3vloiida.y Mr Hunters' appointment is unique in the history of Philadelphia politics, and considerable interest was attracted by his application. He Is a structural at present Is employed at the League Island Na-vy Yird He oama to this city from Boston less thaji two years ago a stranger When newspapers published the fact that a civil service ex- amination would be for applicants for the position of chief if the IHgrhway bureau, Mr Hunter was urged by his wife to take the exajmnation. He at first declined to do so, declaring that ha had no political influence, and knew no one who would back him. Finally he agreed to take it and his family physician and another neighbor signed his application. Sdx 1 persons took tho examination, and to the surprise of the mayor and others, Mr Hunter was the only one to pass. Among tnose who failed was the man the mayor had temporal lly ap- pointed pending civil service exaaiiin-ation, and wtLom he hoped to make the perma- nent chief. As neither the mayor nor any one else connected with the city government had ever heard of Mr Hunter, the mayor de- lajed appointing him pending an Invest- gallon Into the man's record and his q as an executive officer. Mr Hunter had several conferences with the mayor, with the result that he was to-day appointed. His politics Is not publioly known LTJMBEE WAR IN MAINE. Hostilities Renewed Over the Opening of a Water Gate. Chesuncook, Me, Aug-. 4 lumber war, which attracted attention on the St John River during the spring has broken out again, this time at Chamberlain Lake, and serious trouble Is feared. Ac- cording to reports received here to-day, there was a. clash at the lake yesterday a crew employed bv the St John Lumber Company and the agent of the Marsh 
                            

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