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Washington Globe Newspaper Archive: December 18, 1830 - Page 1

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   Washington Globe (Newspaper) - December 18, 1830, Washington, District Of Columbia                                 Francis Presto» Blair, will publish, in the City of Washington, a newspaper entitled,  THE GLOBE.  It Is the purpose of the Editor to dedicate this papèr to the discussion and maintenance of the principle» "which brought General Jaek»o% into office, and which he brought withhlin into office," which have been asserted in his several messages to Congress, and sustained by the course of his administration. As a means of giving permanent effect to those principles, which *e considered essential to the preservation, peace, and prosperity of the Union, the eleètton of the president for a second term will be advocated. His nomination for re-election by the States of Pennsylvania, Ohio, New-York, and New-Hampshire, together with various other-inanifesta-tloris throughout the Union, leave no doubt as to the individual whom the Republicans of the country require to assume the attitude of a candidate, as a means of producing unanimity in the support of their principles. The political aim of this paper will be directed to aid in the accomplishment of these objects. It Will have no participation in creating divisions in the Republican party, by advocating the pretentions ef any m its ranks, who may now endeavor to pre** theirxlaims to the succession. When, at a future time, as on-the present occasion, the voice of the Republicans of the Union shall have indicated the Candidate  ' tuf. world ia oovsmnraa^rio much.  -........-■'■, ■■- - ..._. ' , V 1  "ii«i » ■■ =3=  NO. 4.  CITY OF WASHINGTON, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1830/  VOL. 1.  and its enrolment upon the list of free governments, by the virtuous and successful efforts of a single city, in the short period of thrr ^ days. But although France, our former i.!ly and friend, who stood by us in the dark and gloomy period »f our own revolution, is entitled tbour kindest sympathies on the occasion of her sulk den and successful transition from a gloomy and degrading despotism, forced on the nation by the hostile bayonets ofToreigqmercenaries, to a sysioSHif government comparatively free, by which the ruler is restricted witfifin salutary constitutional limits, and which admits the safe  ,.„_„„_______________________and correct political principle, that the sove-  reiiedon to give effect to their principles, the Gixjue  rc j ffnty 0i f  t Iio state resides in the people, and  U?rule but by their , w*  The increasing interest of the political agitations must not confine our congratulations to t ranee and struggles of Europe, will invite much attention alone. The spirit of freedom is abroad in the to that quarter of the world; and arrangements will  wor j d#  j tri marc h ¡g onward", and will not be  be promptly made to obtain the earliest intelligence. , « m _ individuals bc"in  It is intended, also, to give the Globk a literary st,ne<l. Nations, as well as inatviuuais, ocgin  and miscellaneotw character. " Selections from period- to know their rights, and to respect thejn.  icalsof the highest reputation will adorn its columns, The fire of liberty is now spreading over en-  to gratify the general reader; while, as a vehicle of I | aycd  Europe with inconceivable rapidity.  5SSST»rte'XitTnt^S'vl 1 ^ «*««» L em, Where establishing the  to the useful pursuit» of the country. truth of the maxim, thht for a nation to be  A faithful summary of*he proceedings of Cohgress I f reC)  it needs but to will it, and wheresoever a will be regularly furnished. . people brings itself within the fold of froe  soon enable the Editor to make it a daily paper., sympathies, and to our most cordial cougratu-  --lations.  TEEMS: j n  discharging the annual duty, enjoined by  The Globe will be printed on ^^J^^Uho constitution, of presenting to the legisla-  •iheet- the oriceof the Semi-weekly paper will oe me |  e  <• . -. • . i  doUarsper annum; for the Weekly two dollars and fifty ture a statement of our public affairs, it is truly cents, paid in advance. For six months the Semi- gratifying to be enabled to say, that Pennsyl-  . . *» .1« 1 . il_____ J.tln nnrl tKrAA I a /• V, /V • j p | • .  weekly paper will months tWo dollars.  be three dollars, and for three  GOVERNOR'S MESSAGE.  vania has at no former period of her existence as a commonwealth, exhibited a more'flourish-ing condition than that which she now presents. Her citizens have been favoured with healthful seasons, and blessed with rich and TQUhz &emtemd House of Representatives of I  abundant harvests. Her cities, towns, villages the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. J and farms, bespeak every where, within FbIAOW citizens ; I her borders, the wealth, comfort, happiness,  In presenting to the assembled representa-1 and growing prosperity of an industrious, a  tives of the people, the annual executive message, it affords me peculiar satisfaction, that the circumatanccs under which you have met  moral, and an intelligent people. As an individual State, she is happy in the diversified blessings of her agriculture, her commerce,  to deliberate upon the important concerns 6( her manufactures, and her mineral productions;  the commonwealth, are of a character so lav6r- ^.lst as a conspicuous member of the Union  able and auspicious to the general welfare of. »he shares, in an eminent degree, the high credit  our country, as to justify cordial congratula- and renown winch the national character has  tions, and to demand the homage of grateful attained. Firmly attached to the union, and  hearts for the never failing mercies of him who deeply sensible of its value and importance to  ruleth over all. all who enjoy the protection ot its institutions  . .'. , . ...  f  , . , i and its laws ; Pennsylvania, whilst, on the one  The flourishing and healthful aspect which ^  wj] , ^ ^  none of h( , r  ^  stateg   eur country every where presents, as well in ^ ^  tQ  ^^ . |8 best intercslsj and to  regard to its internal condition as in reference  and d  ¿ nd {{ ]mt the dangerou3  and  to its political relations with foreign govern- J^.  w  J s of oppressive uncons(l . ments, furnishes unequivocal indications that  tutiona f enactm  H  entS) so ,  on the  other hand, will its public concerns are wisely'administered, I ^ ^  markc d disapprobation and se-and that its aflairs, generally, have 4,een con- ^  disaatiBfacti an atteni|)t ,  bv 0|)e n vio-ducted with prudence and care. By pursuing ,  to aocornp Ii s h its dismemberment, or by a wise and conciliatory, but firm and inde- !  ho ulga(|on of  i n . si( |ious, unfounded po-pendent course oi policy, based on the just ^ doctrines, to impair its integrity, or to maxim of « asking nothing that is not clearly |  ond hs safetv .  right, and submitting to nothing that is wrong," the general government has, in the course of] the past season, obtained, by negotiation and judicious commercial arrangements, such im-  The protecting policy hitherto sustained by the general government, cannot, under existing circumstances, be abandoned or relinquished, with the approbation or. consent of the  portant changes in regard to -our intercourse ,  q  .  of  p enn9ylvimia .  Thoir  interests, their with some of the powers of Europe and their M"»' .  m>v  ,,  tho i r  comforts, are  dependencies, as to warrant the most flattering anticipations of future advantage to our citizens, by which the prosperity of every branch of our national industry« whether of agricul ture, commerce, or manufactures, will be ma totally benefitted and enhanced. • As citizens,  prosperity, and, I may add, their comforts, are at this time essentially identified with that policy- The diversified branches of industry in which are citizens are engaged ; the character of the productions peculiar to our soil; the state of the foreign markets to which we had , . , .  ft . «heretofore been accustomed to resort for the  then, otthe United States, and members of the l ale and exc han«re of our staple commodities, federal union» we have cause for sincere fehci-lj  the inter di c ting duties by which the pro «tion that the government under which we  d(jce of ouf agr i cu i tU ralists is excluded fron*, live continues to be administered in a manner  thos£} markct8> leaye U3 no  alternative as to fteculiarly favourable to the advancement oj| lhecourse lo  be pursued. We must either the best interests of our common country, and I  uffe|> our sur „| us  p ro ducc to perish upon our to a full development of the superior excellence  haI ,d s> or we must  establish a market, for its of those free institutions, which, as the fruits  consumpt ion, at home. We must either sub-of a glorious but arduous and toilsome revolu-  mit to the humi | iat i ng  condition of becoming tionary struggle, have been kindly bestowed  tributary to  foreign industry, or, by affording upoo, and continued to us, as a people, by a  cncourace ment to our own, render ourselves beneficent and an all bountiful Providence ; ¡„dependent of foreign imposition and exac-that bv pursuing an enlightened, discreet and  tiom  Under the encouragement and protec-liberal policy, in the administration of our na- L ion nQW  aftorded, our manufacturing esta^ tionai affairs, we have been preserved in j bjjghments are assuming a vigorous and health-undisturbed possession of civil and religious  ful a p pearancP) an d give reasonable promise of liberty ; in tho happy relations of peace «nd l  promotin , r lbe  general prosperity of the coun-friendship with foreign nations; and in the fiill^ ^  of  accomplishing the great end and enjoyment of uninterrupted tranquillity within  degign  contemplated by the friends and advo-our own borders. And that we have the  oi the  protecting system. Happily for us cheering prospect before us that, with ordinary  m  p enn8y | van i aj we  have no constitutional dif-care, and without practising an unnecessarily g cU i tie8 to  embarrass us m reforence to this rigid economy in the management of our fiscal h yMcm>  Our statesmen who 4iave hitherto re-concerns, we shall present to the world, at J 10  presented us in the national legislature, as well distant day, the novel, but sublime spectacle, I  in that of the  g tate> have un if orm ly ex-of a nation consisting of more than twelve  prcsse d their opinions affirmatively, and in millions of freemen, happy in the possession of  tenns by n6 mean3  equivocal, that this nation the most flourishing and prosperous country  po8s< , ss<;s t h e  right, under the constitution, to upon earth, and enjoying the protection of a  pro(cct  ¡ u  industry, bv salutary enactments of government e^ereising a power and energy, h| SOH ^ gainst the injurious consequences of moral and physical, adequate to every emer- f ore i gn  legislation, and that the acts of congress geiicy, and sustaining itself in all its relations, | i mpotj j n g duties on imports are constitutional;  joc»ign domestic, honorably disincurnbcr •d from all its pecuniary obligations, and entirely o«toi debt.  Tî»e momentous and highly interesting  and their constituents have, as unequivocally, responded to those opinions  Although extensively engaged in the construction of works of internal improvement  events which have rccrntly transpired in Eu- within her own limits, and at her own indi-f«pe (of which the past season has been nnu- vidua! expense, Pennsylvania has uniformly, mntty pottfe*,) the rapid succession in which with a magnanimity and a spirit of patrio-«ach other, and the extraordina- Jtism which does her honor, advocated and ty om* *«eare» they produced, whilst they 1 maintained the constitutional right o£the gen-mnckfr m. Mlouivhment at the boldness and eral government to aid in the construction of intfepidify with which the enterprises were works of internal improvement, of a national eemkrted, and inspire ns with admiration of character; tending to bind and to connect more Hm noble bearing, the hiroic virtue, and ar-1 closely together the remote parts of our wide-dent patrtoiii*« with which the actors w ho ac- hy extended territory; to multiply the facilities eomptubed them were animated; they at the  0 f communication between the different parts tame time, awsken pleasing anticipations injof the Union; to diminish time and distance in relation to the future moral and political con-1 the intercourse of its citizens with each other; dttion of the human fatmly, and inspire the to beget, by means of such intercourse, feel-patriot mid philanthropist with renewed hopes ¡ n gs of amity, kindness and friendship, instead thai tho day is not far distant when tyranny  0 f those sectional jealousies, local prejudices •nd oppression »hall be baninhed from the and unkind and uncharitable preposessions, earth, and the principles of free government, which a want of free and friendly intercom-founded upon the equ^ rights of man, shall be munication is always sure to produce; and established and maintained throughout every generally to increase the comforts, and proportion of the world. As American citizens,  mo te the prosperity and happiness of the accustomed to contemplate the light of liberty, people of the United States, and to witness its vivifying and refreshing in- If to promote the happiness of the people is fluences upon the free and liberal institutions the legitimate end of all government, the max-our own favoured country, we have a right, j m mus t be peculiarly true with regard to our d claim it as our peculiar privilege, to min- own, where the whole power is lodged in the le our" congratulations with those of the pa- people, and by them delegated to agents, res-riots of France, on the glorious occasion of j ponsiMe for the manner in which the public lie emancipation of that magnanimous people, concerns of the commonwealth are adminis  tered, and solemnly pledged to promote, by all the means in their power, the welfare and happiness of their constituents. We, as sueli agents, have a di% of no ordinary magnitude to perform, and ought to feel, very sen-1 sibly, the weight of obligation imposed upon us, in selecting the measures by which thief end of our appointment may be most effect«*-ally attained. Of the various projects whieli present themselves, as tending to contribute most, essf>nt)*ly to the welfare and happiness of a people, and which come within the scope of legislative action, and require legislative aid, there is none which gi ves more ample promise of success, than that of a liberal and enlightened system of educating by irfnns of which the light of knowledge will be diffused tliro*-out the w hole community, and imparted £0 every individual susceptible of partaking of its blessings; to the poor as well as to the rich, so that all may be fitted to participate in, and to fulfil all the duties which each one owes to himself, to his God, and his country. The Constitution of Pennsylvania, imperatively enjoins the establishment of such a system. Public opinion demands it. The state of public morals calls for it; and the security and stability of the invaluable privileges which we have inherited from our ancestors, require our immediate attention to it In bringing this subject to your notice on the present occasion, I am aware that I am repeating that which has been the theme ot every inaugural address, and of every annual executive message at the opening of each successive session of the legislature, since the adoption of the constitution. I know, too, that the necessity which has existed, and which has given occasion for the repeated, anxious, and pressing executive reepmmenda-tions, in reference to this interesting subject, arose from the extreme difficulty which presented itself at every attempt to strike out a system adapted to the existing circumstances of the commonwealth, and which might be calculated to accomplish the end contemplated by the framers of the constitution. But difficult as the task may be, it is not insurmountable, and I am thoroughly persuaded that there is not a - single measure of all those which will engage your deliberations in the course of the session, of such intrinsic importance to the general prosperity and happiness of the people of the commonwealth, to the cause of public virtue, and of public morals; to the hopes and expectations of the rising generation, to whom the future political des-si' tinies of the republic are to be committed; or which will add so much to the sum of individual and social improvement and comfort, as a general diffusion of the means of moral and intellectual cultivation among all classes of our citizens. Nor can there be a measure presented to you, as legislators, and as the guardians of the integrity and safety of our invaluable civil institutions, more worthy of virtuous and determined effort to overcome every obstacle th&t shall present itself in opposition to the accomplishment of an achievement so truly laudable. It is n6t to be expectedl that a system can be divised and matured, which shall exhibit, at once, all the qualities of a perfect whole. Like the improvement of the mind itself, the building up of a system intended to advance, to enlarge, and to extend that improvement, must Ire a progressive work. Among the principal adversaries of this measure are prejudice, avarice, ignorance, and error; the fruits of a successful conflict with these, and a victory over them, will be a con sciousness of having been instrumental, by furnishing the means of a general diffusion of knowledge, in securing the stability and permanency of our republican institutions, in adding to the sum of human intelligence, and in elevating the sentiments and confirming the virtue of the present and future generations.  If "knowledge is power," and I believe the truth of the maxim is no longer doubted it must be conceded, that a well educat« people will always possess a moral and phy sical energy, far exceeding that to which an iguorant, illiterate people can attain. It is asserted in a document recently published at the instance of the Pennsylvania Society for the Promotion of Public Schools, that "out of four hundred thousand children in this State, between the ages of five and fifteen, more than two hundred and fifty thousand, capable of receiving instruction, were not within a school during the last year." Audit is not more than probable that, if it were possible to ascertain the fact, every year that has elapsed since the adoption of the constitution, would upon examination, have, been found to present the same deplorable result in a, greater or less degree. If so, what an incalculable loss has not this commonwealth sustained, in the talents that would have been elicited; in the ingenuity and skill that would have been imparted to labor and science; and in the moral and intellectual endowments that would" have been engrafted and matured, had a judicious well arranged system of universal education been early adopted, and rightly enforced, as contemplated and enjoined by the framers of the constitution. To you, fellow-citizens, as the representatives of the people, possessing, as you necessarily must, an intimate knowledge of the wants, as well as the views and wishes of your constituents, in reference to this measure, and bringing with you, from eyery section of the state, a fund of intelligence which will be peculiarly useful in di recting you to favorable results, is committed the arduous, but I trust, not ungrateful task, of collecting, digesting, and arranging the details of a system of primary or common school education, which will shed an additional lustre over the existiug elevated character of the commonwealth; furnish the assurance that a recurrence of the evils complained of will be effectually guarded against, and that Pennsylvania will hereafter possess the energy and power, moral and physical, emanating from the virtue and intelligence of her people, enlightened and improved by a general diffusion of knowledge among all classes and conditions of her citizens, to which she ought long since to have entitled herself.  Among the most effectual safeguards to the peace, the safetv, and the happiness of. the  justic uia li of <hir  peOpt^src a well organized judiciary, and a promg, faithful and impartial administration of IMpMws. The delays incident to the ad-niiflfátrgtion of justice in our courts,as át present <5<H*»tituled, continue to be the subject of serial complaint in many parts of the state, for a speedy arid effectual remedy.— institution imperatively requires, that hall be administered without sale, de-kday. Under the present organization urts^ this constitutional requirement is natf and it is believed cannot'he ?o carried into effect, as to prevent injurious and vexation* delays. The judiciary, is juHtlv considered ail olio ol tho most important branches of the |oternment,and is that arm of the government,®» which tho constitution and laws h;ive, very pn&perly confided the protection of the lite, liberty »reputation, and property of every member ^f the community, »gainst th w assaults of violence,oppression,ma lice and fraud ; and it Ought to be so constituted and organized, as to «ifcrgjlompt and eilcctual security and relief, Whenever áhy of the rights, privileges or im  fifty-seven on the Ligonicr line, a distance Of about three miles, for the purpose of introducing the water into the Ligonicr line of the western division of the canal." In pursarice of the directions of tlieact just mentioned,the board of canal commissioners,, in a spirit of. diligence, industry and zeal, which does them much honour, proceeded to carry mt» effect the contracts uj.on the several lines of the canal and rail-road, and have so far succeeded in completing the sj.iiic, that out of four hundred jjfid twenty-six miles oi canal, (the whole ex-tent that had been contracted for, or which was authoiizcd lo.be put under contract by the act just ixcited,) the water has been already admitted upon the sever»! divisions thereof to an extent embracing a distance of four hundred and six milts. The remaining twenty miles hie■ progressing rapidly towards completion, and will, it is confidently expected, be ready for navigation in all the month of January next. There is reason to believe,therefore, that at tho opening of the navigation in the „ . „ enduing spring, Pennsylvania will prpscnt...  munitiesof the citizen oro jeopardized or as- her own several divisions of canal, an* extent sailed. The system itself has undergone few, of inland navigation, forming a distance in the and those but very si ght modifications, since aggregate of four hundred and twenty-suits first organization under the present consti- miles, in addition to three hundred and two tution. Its energies have not been increased miles of canal already in operation belonging in proportion to tho increase of population, to private companies : making altogether a dis-wealth and business, and tho corresponding in- tance of inland navigation, by means of canals crease of litigation,occasioned by the dishones- within the limits of the state, of seven hun-ty, immorality and crime,which have grotfn up dred and twenty-eight miles, prepared to con within the commonwealth during that period.  vc 7  to  market the rich products, as well agri-It is believed that the public interests require, eultmal as mineral, of the fertile and produc-and that individual interests demand, a thor- t' ve  sections of the commonwealth through ough, radical re-orgeiuzation of the svstein, which they respectively pass; to give life, such as will bring to the judiciary of this 1 vigor and facility to internal commerce in all growing commonwealth, an additional accea- its varieties, and to afford some assurance of sion of virtue, learning and talent, and impart future usefulness, profit and advantage to the to it such an increase of energy and strength, commonwealth. The grading, bridging, and as will render it entirely adequate to a prompt preparing the rail-way bed, for the forty miles and efficient dischurge of its multifarious and I which had been put undei contract between continually increasing duties. Columbia and Philadelphia, are nearly com  The several duties specially enjoined upon p'cted, and will, it is expected, be finished in the executive by acts and resolutions passed nionth of January next, so far as to be rea-at the last session of the legislature, have dut- Uy for the reception of the rails ; which added, ing tho recess, been promptly attended to and when completed, to eighty-one miles of rail-perforrnwl. road now in operation within the state belong-  The commissioners appointed irf pursuance  in £ to  P rivate  companies, will make an aggre-of the resolutions of the 23d of March last, to U' ate  extent of rail road of one hundred and revise the civil code, have, there is reason to twenty-one miles, believe, been activelv engaged in the perform- It is estimated that the whole cost of the sev ance of that duty. The task is one of no or- eral divisions of the canal, and that part of the dinary magnitude, and to complete it within rail-road which have been put under contract the timo limited by tho resolutions,will lequire by the authority of the state, and which are great industry and perseverance on the part of nearly completed, including damages as far as those entrusted with its execution. Much time, paid, and the sum necessary for repairs to the too, will be required for deliberate considéra- 1st of January, 1831, will amount to ten mil tion, critical examination, and careful compari- lions eight hundrad thousand dollars. The son and arrangement, toenablo the revisers to sum actually paid over to the treasurer of the give form and consistence to the work in which board of canal commissioners, is ten millions they are engaged, and to bring it to that state two hundred and eighty-eight thousand one of perfection which the legislature intended, hundred and sixty-three dollars and sixty-sev and the revisers doubtless desire it should as- en cents, leaving a deficiency to be provided sume. A report in part, as directed bv the for by the legislature to meet the demands of resolutions, will, it is confidently expected, be <he several contractors, of five hundred and made to the legislature at an earlv period of its eleven thousand eight hundred and thirty-six present session. No provision has been made dollars and thirty-three cents. I have already by law for compensating the revisers, for anv I mentioned that the sum of fifty three thousand  HnpTon county; *n«l a Macadamiz«! turasikc or « rail rowT, ©rer tin Allegheny moontafn nbontSS mlK-in lengh. The aggregate of the cost of construct ing the several links jurt mentioned, m neceftwry to complete the grand chain of commtmicaUon l»-tween the cities of Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, »houM a rail w«y "over the Allegheny mountain be adopt instead of a Macadamized turnpike road; is estiii.«' at a sum exceeding two millions and an half, and be safely net down at a buuj not exceeding three un; lions of dollars. I have considered it my duty u. " give you this general outline of the works, still cvssary .to be executed, to complete * single line ooinuvuikation between our great eastern an.il v.! rrn cities, with the amount oi the probable expensi which will atlend their construction or execution: im! I submit to the wisdom of lbe legisluture, whrihc sound policy doe? not require, that the connexion Iih :: tioned should be formed with as little delay as possible, and whether the bent interests of the common wealth in this particular, arc not intimately connected ¿\illi its speedy completion.  One jtf the principal designs in relation to the rouHtrtfetion of son*e of the divisions of canal, too, was to accommodate those regions abounding wi'h anthracite and bituminous coal, and to afford facilititt? for the conveyance of those valuable and now almost ndispensable mineral productions, to market. 1 he canals have, however, stopped short 4t points inconveniently distant from the betltfor quart its in which the minerals are deposited, and if permitted lo remain in their present state, will neither accommodate the interests they were intended to promote, nor become profitable to the commonwealth. To accomplish ui-tlier of these ends, reasonable extensions of those sev-I divi«iou* will become indispensably necessary. Surveys have been made of projects of "internal im proveinent in the eastern, western and noHhcrn «er-tions of the state, most of which, if carried into, Jir-! would be of advantage, not ly to the region-.'omitry through which they puss, but would •»•: the general wealth and prosperity of the comn.ui-ity The importance of all these projected works v\i;?. however, from the spirit of enterprise which In- i i fused itself into the minds of our citizens, force th>-m-selves upon public attention, from time to tin.. , ;ts Mu circumstances of the commonwealth shall be h i condition to meet the expenditures necessary for thvi-commencement and gradual completion.  The report of the board of canal commistiont trf will be laid before you shortly, and will er.iiibit in detail, all the facts in relation to the several work*, the immediate cohstmctkm of which is deemed to b.. of primary importance, together with an estimate . > J the cost of each particular work. Prudence would seem to dictate, that until the several works which have just been enumerated, as essential to give vuhu to those which have been finished, or are rapidly pii -greasing to completion, filial I have been compMf ! po other projects of internal improvement should 1 authorized or contracted for.  Tho act relative to the appointment of canal commissioners, approved the 6th of April last, and which provides for the appointment of a board of appraisers, to whom appculs&re to be made by jiersons dissatisfied with the amount of damages offered by the board of canal commissioners, has not clothed the board of appraisers with those powers, which a proper regard for the rights of individuals, as well as for those of the. commonwealth, and a de«ire to do justice to both would seem to require they should possess. In order to arrive at the truth, it becomes necessary in incs', cases, that witne^es should be^ examined by the praisers. There is no tribunal to which the parfi. can resort for process to compel the attendance ot" vs 1. -nesses before the board. It would seem but rea.-o.,.i ble, therefore, that the board of appraisers hhouil revested by law, with the power to issue such puni^ for the appearance, and to enforce the attendance oi witnesses, as will tend to the accomplishment of tbu . object, and also, with authority to administer the necessary oaths or aifirmations to witnesses, preparatory to their examination. I would also suggest the pio priety of 60 amending the act; 1  as to make the report of a majority of the appraisers valid and fina), and tc regulate the manner in which the appeil from the o; fer of the board of canal commissioners to the board u: appraisers, is to be taken or made.  In bringing to your view the state of the finances yf the commonwealth, it is gratifying to be enabkd iu say, that thev have not at any former period presented a more flourishing and prosperous conditio w That they have not only been amply sufficient^ during the fiscal year which has just ended, lo defray the ccr re'u: expeuses of government, but have yielded a surplus, such as has authorised the transfer of consider^)!'; •urns in aid of the fund for the payment of interest on the moneys borrowed by the commonwealth, frun* time to time, for the purposes of internal improvement. The balance in the treasury on the Sl'ih o: November last, was two hundred and forty-lhiet.  four hundred and thirty-three dollars and fifty four cents, the unappropriated balance of the loan of four millions of dollars, may be made available immediately to supply, in part, the deficit mentioned. Should that be done, the sum to be provided to meet the existing de mands upon the canal and rail-road fund, will be four hundred and fifty-eight thousand four hundred and two dollars, and seventy-nine cents.  The Bank of Pennsylvania is bound, by the provisions of thn act of the 13th of March last, to loan to the commonwealth one million of dollars, annually, for aud during the term of three years, after the first day of January, 1881, at an interestof five per cent, per annum. It will be optional with the legislature,, therefore, to authorise % resort to the bank, under the provisions of the act, after the first of January next, or to direct a loau to be negociated elsewhere, to meet the present exigencies of the state, as shall under all circumstances be deemed most for the interest and advantage of the commonwealth.  It may not be improper here to mention, that all the contracts along the several lines of the canals and rail-road, with the exception of that for erecting a dam at or near Johnstown, and constructing a canal of about three miles in length from thence to lock number, fifty-seven, on the Ligonier line, authorised by the act of the '27th of March last, were authorized to be made, and actually were entered into under the authority and direction of our predecessors; and that the more unpleasant duty of carrying them into effect has devolved upon us. Hence arises the necessity for the constant borrowing and expenditure of those large sums of money, from time to time, ou our part, in behalf of the coi.-.monwealth, for the prosecu-  part of their labor in the prosecution of the work, and as expenses must necessarilv he incurred as the work progresses, I would recommend, as an act of justice to those engaged, in it. that an appropriation be made of a sum sufficient to enver tho expenses already incurred, and to compensate the revisers for the care and labor hitherto bestowed in the performance of their arduous duties.  The four millions of dollars, which th« governor was authorized to borrow from the bank of Pennsylvania, by the act of 13th March last, has been received from that institution,in the manner, and upon the terms mentioned in the act, and applied, so far as appropriated, to the several objects to which thev were appropriated by that and subsequent acts. Of the sum thus borrowed, one million ono hundred and nine thousand one hundred and eleven dollars and forty-si* cent«, were, earlv in the mplith of April last, applied to the extinguish ment 6f th« balance of the temporary loan, which had been obtained under the authority of the act of the 22d of April, 1829, of that obtained in virtue of the resolution of the hoatd of canal commissioners of the 3d of October, and the loan of one million of dollars, authorized by the act of the I7th November of the same year. Four hundred ai:d eighty-seven thousand and thirtv-four dollars and for-tv-six cents have been set apart by the com-1 tion of works of internal improvement. Without  missionors of the internal improvement fund,  s, °PPj n g'^ h r W A VC A to  the wisdom or poU-  , . . - -  1  . ¿»j * . J cy wtuch dictated the measure of engaging in a scheme  under the provisions of the act of ¿d April  M  extensive, tending to involve the commonwealth  last, for the repayment of the several loans ob. suddenly in a train of heavy pecuniary difficulties tained from the banks of this Commonwealth, embarrassments, it is sufficient for us to know  • 4t.~ iu "yik «f TY-.™.,.»^- I that the honor and the faith of the state are pledged  in virtue of the act of the 7th of December  (o finitjh that which haa  ^  conunence<1: th J t in ^e  last. (Copies of the correspondence arising dilemma iu which we have been placed, prudence from the negotiation of these loans aie here-1 will dictate that our march should be onward. And with transmitted.) Two millions three hun- the best interests of the commonwealth will require  dred »nd fifty thousand f„ U , hundred and.wen- LST-tt^  ty dollars and flfty-four cents were applied, as canal, and the entire finishing and completing of the directed hy the act of the 27tll of March last, rail road, in order that they may be rendered profita to canal and rail-road purposes, and to aid in We to the commonwealth, and useful to its citizens. , !. • 1 • : 1 4 4 4i 1 I Ou the subject ot internal improvements, my opinion  defraying tho expences incident to the canals  ha3 ever  ^  in fa ^ r c f the policy; and although  and rail-road. And the sum of fifty-three thou- circumstances have occasionally occurred, calculated sand foui hundred and thirty-three dollars and |todampen the ardor of its warmest friends, still I feel -four cents, the residue of the said four per^uaded that a gradual progressive system of ijn-» . , .. I-. i Iprovement, by means of roads and canals, such as this  millions of dollars which remained unappro- L tate might have pr09ecuted  f rom lime  ^  t i mc , with-  priatod. has recently been placed by the bank out embarrassing her finances, or endangering her  to the credit of the commonwealth, and is now credit, would have beenJier true policy. The great mis-  * ,i; an /iQAl nf th*. Ifxrialnturr» Ao thp fnrwl  take »  00  our part, has been in undertaking too much at the disposal ot the legislature. As the lumJ K  once> wW< £  Jm oblj  .  u9 fromyear to » year) 8ince   applicable to canal and rail-road purposes, and  the  commencement of our «ublic work*, to borrow  to aid in defraying the expenses incident to the and to expend large sums of money, and to incur the  canals and rail-road, will be largely deficient, payment of a heavy interest without obtaining from  J <1.. (I,.» i„„,l rv-««, them an adequate return. Although all the works,  and as tne oemanas upon uiai mnu are pres-  that have w „  con « racle d for have b een finished or  sing, I would recommend an immediate appro- L re  ¡ n a St;lte  rapidly approximating to completion, uriation of the unappropriated balance just I yet until those in the east shall be so connected with  mentioned in aid of that fund. «h°1 c  'V he west . *» t . to f ° r ' n one  ^f« cenuected  ,.«.,. • chain of communication between Philadelphia and  By the act of the 27th of March last, entl- Pittsburg, the great emporiums of the east and the tied, "An act making further appropriations west, we cannot expect to derive much advantage  for canals and roads," it is made the duty of  fr< J5?  them - ... . , , ,  . . i e t • • in t The connecting links necessary to complete such a  the board or canal commissioners, "to cause so , ine of c6mnmn jcaUon between the east and the we*, much of the contracts already made upon the | a9  will give value to the works in that direction, and different lines of the canal and rail-road, as render them useful to the people and profitable to the could be done, ,o be completed within .he -JJ££  present year, and directing that they should in  one mUes iu  extent, forty miles of which, as already no way enter into new contracts for the exten-1 stated, have been nearly completed, (the remaining sion of any line of canal or rail-road, except forty-one miles have not yet been put under contract;) C A ^ ^c «, „___ irthno. labout nute miles of canal between Middletown and  for the erection of a dam at or near Johns-  Mar ietta, including an aqueduct over the river Swa-town, and the constructing of a canal and nec- u^.  a bout forty miles of canal and slaA water na-egsarv works from thence to section number ' vigation trom Huntingdon to Hollidaysburg, in Hun  thousand eight hundred and fifty-six dollars and Uv. u ty cents, of which sum there was transferred on the same day into the internal improvement fund, the sum of niuety four thousand four hundred and twenty-five dollars and forty-four cents; leaving; au actual balance in the treasury on that day, of one hundred and forty-nine thousand four hundred and thirty dollan: and eighty cento. The receipts into the treasury fcr the fiscal year, ending on the 30th November laM were six hundred and twenty-four thousand four huu dred arid fourteen dollars and eighty-seven cents-, showing an excess of revenue for the year 18S0,*over that of 1829, of tweuty-five thousand three hundr<K. aud fifteen dollars and seventy-sevcn-cents.  The premium of two hundred and twenty thousand dollars, paid by the bank of Pennsylvania, gn the loan of four millions of dollars, under the provisions ot the act of the 13th of March last, has so far aided th« fund theretofore set apart for the payment of the interest on loans, as to euable the commissioners of the internal improvement fund, to discharge the interest which became due on the first of August last, and tc leave. a balance in the hands of the treasurer of that fund, applicable to the payment of the interest iv)u :\ will become due on the same account on the fir. t ^; .February, 1831, of one hundred and forty-eight thous and three hundred and twenty-four dollars and forty t\$o cents. The excess of revenue over the expt-nu. tures for the months of December and January, will authorise a transfer from the treasury into the internal improvement fund, of a sum in addition to the above mentioned-balance, sufficient to meet the interest which will become due on loans al the above irtit-tioneddate.  The revenues to be derived under the several acts of the last session " for the levy and collection cf taxes upon proceedings in courts and in the office of register and recorder," passed the 6th day of April last; the " act to regulate inns and taverns," approved the seventh day of April last; and the " act graduating the duties upon wholesale dealers of merchandize, and prescribing the mode of issuing licenses^" also approved the seventh of April last, will not be paid into the treasury in season to be made available to aid in discharging the interest of the public loans, which will become due on the 1st of August next. <nor can the amount of revenue to be derived from those several sources, be ascertained at this time, su a* to form a guide for the future provision to be mude l y the legislature for the payment of the interest on tin-loans which have been, aud hereafter may be obtaiu-' ed by the commonwealth. To meet the interest, then, which will become due on the 1st of August next, it is estimated that the balance in the treasury on tha: day, will be one hundred and seven thousand dolhus, arising from the ordinary sources of revenue, and from canal tolls fifty thousand dollars, making together one hundred and fifty-seven thousand dollars, ui which sum one hundred thousand dollars may be wade applicable to the payment of interest; and the remaining fifty-seven thousand dollars, should the tolls produced by the canals, amount to the sum anticipated, will with the usual accessions of ordinary revenue, be sufficient to meet the current expenses of government. as no revenues will, in the mean time, be derived from other sources, applicable to this object, there will be a deficiency in the fund for the payment of interest on loans on the first day of August next, of two hundred thousand dollars, to be provided for by the legislature.  To sustain the credit of the state, and to enable it to borrow money froih time to time, upon advantageous terms, the establishment of an adequate fund for the prompt and punctual payment of the interest of tho sums borrowed, will be altogether indispensable. Iu a communication mad« to the legislature, oq the 1-ltU of January last, which will be found ttpon their journals, and to which 1 would now refer, I endeavored to direct their attention to such source« from which a revenue might be derived, as. 1 then thought might Improperly and safely resorted to for the puppose of providing an interest fund, entirely adequate to the existing and increasing necessities of the commonwealth. In reviewing the several objects of taxation pointed out in that message, I cannot bring my mint! to the conclusion, that there is one of those enumerate.' and recommended, that would not, under the circumstances in which the commonwealth is placed, be entirely proper, or that ought to elicit from any quarter, the language of complaint. A tax on anthracite and bituminous coal, recommended in .the message referred to, has, it is true, been objected to by those engaged in the traffic which that commodity viciiis, oa tie   

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