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Peninsular News And Advertiser Newspaper Archive: September 13, 1861 - Page 1

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Publication: Peninsular News And Advertiser

Location: Milford, Delaware

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   Peninsular News And Advertiser (Newspaper) - September 13, 1861, Milford, Delaware                               FT7 f VOL. Letter'from Washingt6a. [We have been permitted to make the following interesting extract from a pri- Vttte letter to a gentleman of tfifa town, tinder date of Sept. 4, 1SG1 I feel so good over old I3cn. Butler's magnificent victory, that I want to tnlk with yon. I know that you fee! elated and rejuvenated. For my part I regard h as one of the most important victories since the Revolution. Now we can car- ry the war into Africa we have an ex- tended inland coast entirely at our mercy. While we hold Hatteras Inlet, we hold the fe'cy to the whole North Carolina, Georgia and Virginia shores bordering on Albemarle Sound. The government already baa under consideration a pro- ject to invade those States via. Hatteras Inlet, which is a rear attack upon Rich- mond. The Davis tuobocracy have not sufficient men to guard this extensive sca- Coast, hence it will be absolutely neces- withdraw large numbers of troops from those collected at Manassas this will weaken that so that the im- mense army being concentrated in and abont Washington, will make short work in conquering them. But I do not look for an attack by McClellau upon Ma- nassas (unless, provoked to until we hare concentrated some on the coast of North and South Carolina. This latter force, acting in conjunction with the reinforcements soon to be thrown into Fortress Monroe, will begin a vigorous campaign toward Richmond and Norfolk To guard those precious cities, immense drafts mnst come from Beauregard's army, on the Potomac. Thns yon see in part the deep laid -policy of the War and Navy Departments. The Stars and Stripes now ware in defiance right in the teeth of the heart of Secession. Day after day Regiment npon Regiment ar- rives and quietly proceeds to encamp- ments outside the city limits. There is none of the clap trap and injurious parade of forces such as you witnessed. I-have seen bnt one Regiment on Penn- M i FRIDAY. SEPTEMBEKIS. Senator Jolmson in Cincinnati. It was my intention to have pone through ;his city quietly and unobservi d, although I am free to say that the ap- probation which you. my fellow citizens, have bestowed upon my conduct, is up- predated, and will ever" be held in affec- tionate remembrance by me. A few weeks since, whin it was rny privilege to pass through wort pleased to bestow upon me a dem- onstration of your npprobation fur be- yond my merits or my worth. My efforts still continue nnabatpcl in trying to carry out those measures which are necessary to sustain the Governmeir in its emergency, and I hope that noth- ing will ever transpire which will tend to abate these effoits I have to-night read with great pain and regret the reported recantation, by a distinguished citizen of Tennessee, o'f the views hitherto expressed by him. I regret this step on the part of that dis- inguished citizen for two reasons. I re- gret it on account of our canse, but I re- gret it more on his own account. If it were my case, I do not hesitate to say that rather than make such a recanta- tion, I would be screwed down in my iron coffin and buried in the earth the feet foremost. Bnt I trust that it is not so, and of what I know of that distin- guished citizen, I do not believe tbe re- port to be true. A few weeks since when I passed through your city, the crisis was thicken- ing, and since then it has continued to row thicker and blacker, and if the re- ent dilDcnlty be jrot rid of Not one. Such a treaty would be one of war. It could not lie otherwise We could not escape a Ikht under it, and if the finht must come, ir had better come now. [Great applause.] It is said that Beelzebub was onre an angel in lisa ven, but he rebelled, and tried to overthrow the government of Jehovah and the result was that he was, kicked out of huiivcn by the nujrcls. Whenever virtue compromises with vice, vice makes an inroad upon virtue. If virtue compromises with vice to-day, to-morrow there must lie another com- promise, and the next day another, until virtue h gone and vice rules in stead. If truth compromises with false- hood, fiilscl'ood will -encroach upon truth, until falsehood becomes truth, and truth falsehood. Compromise between right and wrong to-day, and you must com- promise again to-morrow, and again the next day, and so on until right is gone and wrong supplies its place. The time for compromise is gone by now is the time to put down crime and punish vice the time to stand on these great prin- ciples of truth which underlie the Con- stitution. Now is the time to act. I saw the other duy a very pood fig- ure by which a noble son of Kentucky, the Hon. Joseph Holt, had well illus- trated the present difficulty by the story of the child which was brought to Solo- mon, being claimed by women. _ When the Judge offered to divide the child, the pretended mother said, "yes, I am content to take bnt the true from An-rnst 1 18fiO, to the 31st of Jo- Move ihe negro, but that the question of ken. He has waited untif he felt himself ly, reached the enormous total of color was nothing, and that the Inlioiiti-r reduced into wheat class everywhere was made for Slavery" at the rate of civt. per qr as c-om- This is now the prevailing doctrii.e pared with qrs. in Ihecorrcs- j amons: the leaders of the Southern Con- ponding period of IsJSI GO, 5.1C7.UOO fcderucy, and the question of their sue-j qrs. in the _ corresponding poriod of cess or defeat involves the spread or the J 1858-9, and qrs. in the corrcs- overthrow of this doctrine It could no ponding period of 1357-8 The vast ness longer prevail in ihe Union and under! of this year's figures will be further shown j the Corstitution, for not only had the! extruding the comparison back to Republican masses rebelled, bnt a million 1843. In that year only qrs. Democrats, under the the lead of Doug- longer to consider of wheat 1844, 1 qrs. 'at and flour were imported in las, had refused any qrs.; in 1845, j the protection of strong enough for this n'ep j and now that he has issued his proclamation, he will carry it out to the letter. Jf the current month shall witnvFS the drum- head execution ol a few score of traitors, Missouri will be qui'-t, while ihe army uf ihe West moves southward fur winter quarters. J3ut General Fremont's proclamation strikes a deeper SEWAED. him, (Mr. Liiicaln.) towering over the crowd and topping even the General Scott, tire ve- tenin, bat for whom it is not too mnclr to say, in spite of henven-born warriors and citizen soldiers in civil life, just as CuhinelK exist in the militia and volun- teer rc-gimeiits, the President wonld linhly not be there nt all. The bold, jfoninc front of the the massiv" i man. blow. It not only disarms the it extirpates the very I" head and broad foreherd, the full, fine root of the rebellion, and makes it jrn eye, the month brood and distinctly' cut, hlavery the fir.-t duty of I possible for its agitators long to pursue J and the square, resolute chi, YJ, i------ m'st to ke lotfii was i if, or te renew it hereafter "The urop. He nave not at hand the means of Ma- to destroy the Union, subvert the Con- erty, real and personal, of all persons in ting the sources of this importation, but slitmioii, establish new Government the Stats of Missouri who shall nu helact is apparent from all the fibres based wholly on the dogma that there arms against the United Slates or who1 that the demand in England for bread-j must be a rnliiis and a servile class, and shall be directly proven to have taken stnlfe goes on increasing at a rate by force of arms conquer and subjugate I active part with their enemies in the ,'he VPry had dared Highest importance. ought to be polls these and to claim that public uxr and their if any arj htrrliy declared free.- v uv.t.M.vf, auulU UJilllU able to secure the contract of it, and with Freedom and Democracy should have a I they liace, our vast resources, if we do not do so it j fair chance in the management of affairs. men." will be onr own fault. To this end we Controversy is now appealing to t'e have already suggested the means lying j world, European and American for ad- ready at our hand. Having so much indication the advantage of other regions, in our intimate and very extended commercial relations with Eiurland. we must cake It is not a matter of indifference to us what the people of England, and Ger- ----------------many, and France think of this contest good use of it; and although we may i but it is of fur greater importance to temporarily lose on our crops, yet we can them. Thousands of the brave men who better afford to do so for ultimate gain j are now fighting the battles of the Re- tnan can any of our competitors in the public, the gallant Irishmen of the 69th dis-! Regiment, and the Germans j Uie nearest court-martial for I he sentence conraged, and devote their attp.itiou to ho have saved Missouri, were not many J of death. A! u since the Missouri rebels oiuu-crops. lyeursiior months azo. in their native I almost exi-Iushely slaveholders, this arrest at- i tention and reeall the types of some I tc-r known commanders but are justly proud of one who, in a militnrv career extending beyond half a cent has been uniformly successful, and wlin has not been less fortunate in any diplo- matic or political functions he has under- taken to dbchurge The who bnrnt the home in which lie born, lest it phoiild see the birth of another Uy this declaration every rebel in the traitor, and who charged the name of n state is rendered powerless efcn if he county in their State called after him la hhonid escape with his life. His proper- 'hat of Davis, will not do him any barm t. _ _i TT' i i -i ty is not only worthless to him nnd bis cause, but is converted to the use of the Government for putting down the rebel- lion. His slaves will not only be swift witnesses against him, bnt as loyal ser- defenders of the Union may rants end him as a traitor, and lead him to ic- ..m., uui line uiuus will oe laro-e V deflflPiit nnH o rr-pr nf suit of the contest has chilled, (I menn mother said, "no, rather than hurt the ply needed from abroad there'' teTsVates the battle fought at and di- child, it to her." So with us, let also, a very conriderable market forour of ma Bpmted you how much more heavily us not submit to have our Union divi- surplus grain and flour i hfn LH With thr> fart ..t -n 'i Ji uame i eiy Mavetiojcters, tilts aim secnniles. When i iron, will II I land, looking forn-ard with hope to a ca- I proclamation is tantamount to the aboli- to the keen, clear face of .Mr crops win oelargely deficient and n sup-' rcer of J with posterity. His look nnd manner indicate that his mind is still vigorous, though the -mows of seventy-six winters have their honors round liin brow; but when the towcr-Iiku frame and srcat torto are set in motion, there is a feebleness in -rait nnd a want of im-v- crinthc limbs which show that aee nnd wounds, and hard labor, have taken ti.-ir hostages and securities. When one tun sylvania Avenue in two weeks, although the depot is the scene of almost continual arrivals. Go where you will in any di- rection on the Maryland side of the city and you will find Regiments encamped within sight of each other for ten miles round. As to commissirate wagons and ambulances, horses and mules, the like was never before seeu in America. I have stood in one place while 700 wag- ons lumbered past Out at the Carols near the Observatory are empounded at this time 2000 horses and 1500 mules 500 to 600 arrive daily and abont 300 to 450 are tamed and sent off with wagons and ambulances per day. The Provost Guards are paroling the streets both night and day, and their vigilance has the happiest effect in clearing oar i streets of vagabond citizens and strag- gling soldiers. It is a rare sight to see more than a half dozen soldiers on the avenae at one time, and as to the ine- briates I have not seen one in two weeks. McClellan is comraander-in-chief of all the forces in this department in fact. Gen. Scott, since the battle at Bull Run, has gradually subsided, till the most that he does is to attend Cabinet meetings and conferences and offer suggestions, which are adopted or not as McClellan thinks best. The fact is Gen.Scott is no longer competent to control the army of the United States. We need youth, vigor and ambition, ability, experience and caution. need (or did need) a man in whose veins none of the first blood of Virginia circulates. Scott has ____ heavily it have fallen npon the-lovers of the Union in the Southein Stares, and how much greater must have been its tenden- cy to discourage the Union men there. But I tell you that if the sullen, smother- ed, Union feeling of the South has rece- ded, it is like the smothered fires of Ve- suvius, which ocly fall to gather more lava ami more heat, that when comes they may burst forth with tie more destructive fury. [Cheers.] When the time comes in which the smothered sentiments of Southern Union men shall burst forth, they will visit destruction upon those who have exiled them from their homes and devastated their proper- ded, though the false mother willing to take the half, but instead of giving it to them we will take it all.__ [Long and loud applause.] I intend to fight in defense of this Government as long as life shall last. It i is wrong to destroy the best Govern- ment ever devised fur the use of man. I would rather see this continent swept back into a howling wilderness than to isperity and honor in the Uni- j tion of slavery in that state, bv a word came hereto Gnd that j vui nian ns roan which tlicv surplus grain and flour. Fracce has in-1 had failed to find at home and they ar'- mav be creased rapidly in population under the rived, perhaps, just in time to join iu the auspices of her present Emperor. Paris i bloody struggle" for the preservation of sufficiently illustrates this and the Browth the idea which had stimulated them to of that splendiJ capital has been so nn- j leave their homes and brave the perils of nrpppdpntoH tn I_______j ._ ___-1____ m. and a blow. It illustrates what this journal has so often said that nhile a proclamation of emancipation issued from strongly reminding us of Mr. Jerrold, the contract between the mili- tary character, as developed in the j-ri.i- support of the Cabinet and Washington, without a military power j Union.and the civilian clement displayick in the rebel states to enforce, would be 'n l'le statesman who is considered t.i I _r-_..j j .in-.------------- um.c mi.- penis ot i-vraaiuic oi contention at the ult'ministry, is very sti precedented as to leave no doubt of its I an unknown sea. These men have left the issuing of such a procinmaton TK beeomintr. before _-.._i .b ULR JESSIE. but a brutum fttlmen to the South, and the "est poliiician forAmerican ajiossible subject of contention at the Ministry, is very striking. becoming, before many vears, a rival of London in size. The" French manufac- turing cities have also received a vast impetus, and there can be no doubt that the immense expansion of commerce, the see a monarchy on the ruins of general U.'is of wealth have produced acorrc.poE rresponding multiplication of population in the conn- try generally. In 1850 Prance not only supplied her own wants from her soil.bn't ty. Manassas should but stimulate yon to make such a demonstration as will teach traitors, both Xorth and Sonth (for I tell you that you have them thattnere is a power in this Government sufficient to preserve it from destruction, and that you are determined that the Union shall be preserved. [Cheers.] We have heard much said abont the rights-of this section and of that section, about the right of this sort of and to that sort of property, bnt I tell' you that the free cause of this strife lays deeper than any such current. Ever since men began to be organized into civilized communities there have beqn those who contended that all power orig- inated in usurpation, and that the few were borne to "rule the many. This is Jou Without replying, but race swept out of being than that the sun should set forever in darkness npon man'j hope for self-govennrent. The fall of this Government world on argument that man's capability j of sel .government was at an end, which growth of population we now find that lies at the foundation of our noble struc- 1 upon the occurrence of a short crop there would be to the j was a considerable exporter of cereals. v i i ui u Dijuri irrop.inere Aow is the time to establish the is a deficient supply and the necessity fo- f what, we ImM in HI1 nr lor an importation. Of course, if prices u-ere to rise, the French farmers wonld acquire a stimulus to increase their pro- for which themTs greaT rooifi ture. truth of what we hold to be true. "What if our flag has been trailed in ifte dust and sullied let it be placed in stalwart hands baptize il m Ihe sun's -fire; bathing it in a nation's blood, establish j their agriculture beine in a its reputation on a firmer basis than ever before. Never surrender. Jones, tlie naval officer, very primi- lion succeeds, either in subduing the United States, or in establishing a rival and send terror and desola- her hnsband's side and does O.....L a'ue, auu uoes tion thoueh the South. General Fre- mont's proclamation is a tonic to the na- and exhilarating. In another month we hope to hear him re- not com- behind them other who are j wiT watching the issue of this fight with an Federal army shall enter them in i out making a terest second only to that wi.h which force, will be hailed nith acclamation at I in the they watch their own daily efforts for..... their diily bread. It may be for the in- terest of the titled aristocracy of Europe to see the Southern Coiifedercy triumph, but for the landless millions, no event so' deplorable could happen, short of their own reduction to Slavery. If this rebel- plain of weariness or fatigue, or find it. necessary to leave him to go to faslmm- able watering places, or keep pos'cd in the doings of the fashionable world __ ler shall echo it'lrom SavannahT j U e shall be curious to observe the ef- j wife of a Presidential candidate, the nil-' lect o, upon the English mired of the higher circles in LoinJi.u T, v people. Will they note believe that this and Paris, as well as in America aid European immigrant will be grievously m reality and effect a war against I now the active, iudwtrioaf STrrtirv f circumscribed. Slavery has not lost sight slavery they justify their owu j her husband of the original Territorial controversy, avowals of sympathy in such a war and means to securefonts own uses every; The answer will be of the least possible important fact, and s outk.ngreir.on winch it can either occupy f consequence to us, but of the highest the interviews live condition. But their ability to do When Paul j much is limited by their poverty conse- f ln nn en-i quent upon the extreme subdivision of j California are to be s SRES the ocean, his lieutenant, becoming the means of improvement and if seared, struck his colors. The enemy, i were to prevent the i me i iae 111 UTIucS O seemg ,nc colors struck, and being hard throwing a large supplv into France from OV. Ca left nntlhrnno-h n tiMimriot tl... n. by, called out through a trumpet, Do Southern sympathies, else why did he at the ontset of the struggle advocate the evacuation of Fort Sumter Why did he not accept the hundreds of regi- ments that were offered prior to the bat- tle of Bull Ran Cameron has cleared his of the charge of non-accepUnct of offered regiments. He and it is he principle which underlies the contest BOW going on. [Cries of "That's And if this Rebellion should succeed n destroying the Government, as I pray jod it may not, then there would be es- tablished upon its ruiws either an aristo- cracy or a monarchy. The question sub- mitted to yon is not Shall we stop at Manassas bnt the issue is, you must either conquer them or they will conquer you. If they take Washington, do you think they mil stop? No. They will take Baltimore; and if thcv take Balti more, they will want Philadelphia and having Philadelphia, thej will march to New York, until, as their Secretary of War said in Montgomery, they will dic- tate the terms of their compromise with- in the walls of Faneuil Hall. I speak plainly it is their intention to give yon a military dictatorship. The same bay- onets which destroy this Government will dictate the next. Instead of a Con- stitution, they will pire you swords and bjyouets. We need not mince or hesi- tate in this matter. We speak in com- mon parlance, yon must either whip them or they will whip yon. They are, manv of them, insolent, proud braggarts, like seeing that the colors were down, Paul Jones palled out his pistol and killed the lieutenant; then, again hoisting his flag, the United States, we might continue to command that Xorth Amer ON TBTAT., Democratic institutions are indeed on answered, "No, I am just gettia- ready nstuutions are indeed o to fiaht." LC thnt ,h. 1D llie Unlted and in a to fight." Let that be in the are just getting ready to fight. I do not wish to refer to my Stale in any feeling of egotism. But where can I look, save to that environed spot, Eas- tern Tennessee 1 It is ray home. It was there I selected her who is the moth- er of my children. It was there that tlieir infant minds were taught by their loving grand-parents to love virtue, to be gocd and true. The people there are brave love them. They took me Ijy the hand and encouraged me step by step until I gaiued my present posi- tion. What though I am driven from tlie State and my family cannot follow me? What though thousands are leav- ing the malion of What have my sons done What have these my friends done Wbat is the important sense than our English suppose. We can hardly blame the aris- tocracy of Great Britain for seeking to derive from our present national troubles an argument against the ballot and the extension of suffrage, and equal repre- sentation, though we find it impossible to see wherein we should be better off if onr customs and laws, in these particu- lars, had been less liberal. But there are democratic questions now pending in this country, of far greater consequence than any which have ever divided Eng- lish or American conservatives and rad- icals at least for many years ppst. Those who are familiar with onr polit- ical contests for ten years past, know what giantic strides Constitution beneath substantiated by others in power, that which they lived, and wbich they sealed Scott prevailed upon him to accept no their blood If they doa'' Vant to clnr.ge the Gov- why subvert it If they do why destroy question. If prnre nnd spoiled children and badly spoiled, at see her former rights nnimpared. that Ton mast whip it out of them, I I will stand by these loyal people.__ or they will whip you. [Loud They never deceived, they never bctray- Mucn has been said abont comprorai- J ed me. never false to their ses. What! compromi-e nith rebels I pledges, and I never will be false to with nrras in tlieir hands Compromise mine. with traitors who would subvert your How Ion? h.is it been since we pra' Constitution f Do yon want ar.y better in strains of pno'-rv find the compromise than the Cjnstitntion made j glories of No, tell is by Washinptoa nnd the patriots of the no; the tyran-v of thni- i-v and unqualified denial of the Right of Man, as man, to himself, to his familv, to The demand for new territories, north as well ns sonih of the present slaveholding region, the involvt- ment of the country jn foreign do- mes-ic wars, whh Mexico ,md with Kan- mj uuiit; n out 15 [lie i 1-he.d and front of my offending, but ,ove for our country 1 My intention is to perisli in the effort or restore to Tennes- make' htfWntaB for oc-1 moral significance for the English nation, of his command, attends to much of by others. Free emigration to OI Texas is stepped. Xew Mexico and Arizona, the Indian Territory and the end appropri- m n !the sluffed and painted- and denizn.r.l Mot Partisans, Bnt Patriots. women who, got up after the style of tbo sympathy now would come too i business correspondence nnd late to do ns a substantial good-perhaps respect snpplies the place cf a even too late to save their own fnl, industrious second self Independent. Thnl is a wife f The small farmers have not holding military despotism will be let times more dangerous to thoseTcrritories' prevent the rise in own, than are the Indian tribes with which we have nmv I Il ls n trreat that, in a great ua- ,'latcst plate, think ibf own than are T crisis like tliis- men of "eeds eompletest model of an ancient ,r Xm we stceinv Ef unite in an effort to throw aside grace. It is to be j common political differences, and sink Jenklns won't get his eager eye nj.oi. the partisan in the patriot. Party op- j Fremont, because the beauty o' her position is all verv well under ordinary wor'J 's 'l "'s done in a quiet, RIIO.S- circomstances. It has its useful result's as well as its petty inconveniences. Men with one set of political opinions watch white and black, terested in the present contest of ideas, and of dynasties; not between the House of Have and the House of Want, bnt be- tween the House of Right and the House of vilege. Every constitutional Government in the civilized vorld, Govern- ment which takes any interest in the pro- gress of civilization, mnst be solicitous for the succassof the North in its contro- versv with the semi-barbariin the course of men who maintain hostile work is that it is done in a tentations manner, from her pure, wom- anly instinct of love and duty, mid it would destroy its great charm to it hawked and placarded like a new pnti-iit medicine. There is no danger, the nerfnmed.patent leathcred.kid jrlov the and views, and nrc in return vigilantly scrut- inized and criticised by their opponents. "Out of this nettle danger, we pluck the i Jenkins delights in what is hrillinni. flower in times of peace but in j nnd meretricious, and woiilil i.m. a time of civil war, snch a principle will of assisting even "our JeRsiu" in not apply. There should be but one h" husband's musty paper.-, in party existing umonc; loyal citizens then- '''s western office. Brummagem Feudalism to fighTibr Deling oi tneir own novprtr >un _r___.1 sas, for the sake of ttore that the army in front of Ueattregard was sufficient for the day; the resell was, that our troops were over- powered. Scott loves Virginia, hence bw iwlii position to lay her in p. tyranny by over Poland J I nm eivcn to %t mr I 'vernier nets mu-t lie n ftire indirntion of i j my future course. I intnfi to caning new recions for slave have been almost the least of Slavery's offences. The right to dominate over the negro derived some sort of respectability fiom history .custom, nml the Constiintion. Bat following I and b-v closely upoi the heels of these encronrh- j men'.s for the snke of mnintnnmc Mack I Slnvery. hove hnri doctrines nnd nets which, if not would lend incvita- bly to the snbjnpition of the laboring every whore; nrd every vote j perpetuation of their own poverty degradation. And were it not for questions of the balance of power, and for fear or jealousy of each other, there can be no doubt that substantial tokens of European sympathy would come to us. But the European peoples who make and nr.make Governments and Ministries.can- not faN to be upon onr side. To think otherwise is to despair of the progress of he human wee. For, we repeat it, no matter how slow onr Government and people may be to appreciate the character of the controversy in which they have become involved, and making all necessary allowances for the dented embarrassments and complications to Gen. Fremont's concerning proclamation nnion-r the support of anything nnd everything loyal people ef all classes even honorable for the rescue of the country All creeds, all systems, all schemes "of political integrity or political ambition should be subordinated to this; and every man, call himself what he may, should be proud not to find himself designated ns a republican or a democrat, a this or a that, but n Union man beyond dispute, and resolved at all hazards to stand by the nationality of his Americanism, and the supremacy uf the Federal Coustitu- tion and laws. It is a great misiake for men who mean well, and are honest in their notions of patriotism, to "aid and comfort'' the cn- nhose prejudices do not at all im-lini: them toward hira or toward the Admin- istration, it is well to note the remark- nf The Si. Louis Republican, a Dcnm- eratic paper, and one which has bem r-- raarkable for hostility to Fremont nn-l to the late Col. Benton, and certainly has not been icmarkable for zealous de- votion to the Administration Mr Lincoln. The Rrpubhcan Fnvi, :he measures threatened in mation "are measures of the most ordinary stringency but the wi-d.nn their promulgation by the supreme offi- cer of 'he Army of the West we nn' c with which the Administration have hnd te deal, ibis is pre-eminently the strngjjle of the nge between Liberty and Slavery, Democracy and and mast by be recognized as such Onr j ns Kncred as that of Italy or of j and is every day pro wine to an i of sublimity. Rhich, if we are true to onrselvet. must mnfcp it ore of the of the onr diridr-d con dnccs a state of linor distractions, ond T some a Jvatitnpe from but became it pro- mmuil exasperation ,j.c not wi.sh to form another, this I this Mmj'lr we cnnno! live on of frieridNhip under a ConMitnlion, cnr. we hope KO to Jive under a mere trcn'.y If the day thon'd ever I prnj God (bat i! i.crer mnv, yon sh.ifl compromifcf- tlino tli.it of to the W. fed hot shot ie fired, tho ord- used is elevated  hM people nml Mn.d thro-orh j for the prolongation of ,he rule of the i he rain the heat toil nnd tr.th n bHw at his .e sword until, if needs he. I hate jilwriv The Y.nkr- and I IV1 n 'on, n_-o nrnonncccl to ibe people of the North She truth Dint j tion. Men in arms ftgninsfthe Oovc'm- to o- ron." j Kcnt are not forrirn endows hot In ?hp XortWn people fonnr? to be tried bv conrt lihfition npon the sltar of mv country's lilicrty. Hnvintj his (hunk s Mr .Tnhi'son retired crnid prolonped Do irra- r V' o of rnrmt rests. Tbe it discharged very After being placed rn tbe rannon ORV. Dix has now the ssme eommwid tbs.t his ffttbcr brfd before him io 1S13. Yon mns; mrtt Yoo it !hc Ulk." The Brcadstnfe Trade, M ng h.i4 l.c-en sjiitl respec'iitr the crfiwine Hont of brfatlOufT- in fr'.m year to rear, th" magnitude of the no i cettD to be a! dil npprr- ciflt'-.! in America.. I'erliftps the r-araeroph, fro-n tbe Lond -n Time? cf A-igcM 22, may PTVC to enlighten roft-T [Critt of rhrrr.s.j Soppcxe a Ire-sly should bp tnnde wii-h j The -Importations of wheat end Ronr the tbe rebels, woold nor of the diUnrMng j thif yrar burp bwn on A r-erfpctly nnpsr- and ckairnts hrooghv shoal the rces- alicifd barmg n fhc ranch n this ov. and nrtt-d upon it. FnfPcifiily announced thrir t'ie hsd aiiple time to thrir for thr change. They saw thit tbe Mnd-wir rnmmg with in "hnpf thai there. nn lontrrr for any futore in Ststw Go-' trrnrnr'-i! and nnrfcr its the four rraf hrtwfeti and Gen. Fremont's Proclamation At length th" rs laid at the root of thr tree. The Proclamation of Gen- i F'nr'.T prt-dilft-tioi-.s: the two do- era! Fremont strikes down the rebellion tirvcr i withir. the linrs of his army of occtipa- whether the mfi at the head of tion. Men in arms the 0 rebrk, fnartial, ami when Indpfd, thry oonvictcd, to br rhof. Missouri is infcs- rnmirc rnn- tfd with Hcrtt traitors wht> co-operate rebel invaders from and emy unintentionally, by keeping: up the I fident will be conceded by cverv In. little polnical bickeriiics nnd dirisiocs loyal citizen." This, coming fr-m winch nnd give piquancy to a source, and from a paper whiHi w.-t onr flection strnsrcrlrs in unexciting sea- know thoronchlv the nrpent sons. It n a creat tnistnke, not only be- for the most riporons policy.is and of prave significance FOR THE TIMES. Tim-" -i-n.-nj 1 our contemporaries who. enure itf Ihe Union, yet i course of Major General to reflect on the consequences, npo i us nM. cf or, if they i., cnll ;hem, moderate nnd r' mrnsnrce. The situation of .if? r-i- il, Miss-onri c.iP.e aloud Tor flic moM ons proftinrp. And it is most for vise ihnt iLs drstmv tin is conS Jed to Uo'd nnd cnTTflic 'iuj'fl-. are no times for half A darinr rvj-enitor is not newssjiiit ftiliful or Jfjs The h- 'ir resolution and prompti'nrlp, We harp nonch f f t lhe patriotic in otherdircctumc to work in harmony. for the cfnpr.il Wl- Oar fir-t is to uphold the nnd lit neit mny be due to l'int GovernnvM rhoioecr not. if t i: fo their snppori T.'rp ron-itry OPPP. i mn.r po bark to onr be the men of onr nrr rujri' ho'iufKs to i as partivans. Im rnlly fi ,nfi ,clipri op.n t; right wrtiohps. Etfry- Frfrorint csr-s he nrrfr rtt- K ti- FVoetors of Law ind bod_f fcno'ws that raporinc Ov Frifl. k. of I vert, hit r n J h tmrn hy with ad- .'SPAPERf   

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