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Peninsular News And Advertiser Newspaper Archive: August 9, 1861 - Page 1

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Publication: Peninsular News And Advertiser

Location: Milford, Delaware

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   Peninsular News And Advertiser (Newspaper) - August 9, 1861, Milford, Delaware                               l- TOT.. IT. MILFORD, DELAWARE, FRIDAY, AUGUST 9. 1861. WHOLE NO. 219. Southern Society, Slavery, and Se- cession. To Erft'ior of K. Tribune i SIR It seems to me-that the currents Ofld counter-currents of opinion and feel- ing in those regions of the South with which we are now dealing should be more thoroughly knowu. A long per- Bonal acquaintance with those regions iii'iaces uie to submit the following state- ments Baltimore, Richmond and Washing- ton are types of three entirely different Societies, and interests. In Italy "all toads lead to Rome in the South they all lead to Slavery, and thence the de- scfetu is easy to the Avernus of Seces- sion- And oar Northern Generals most have tracings of these moral and speiaf routes, as well as maps.of jmilitary roads. In Baltimore there is but little direct slave, interest. Indeed, the camber of slaves there held can scarcely be regard- ed as involving so much wealth as the piratic slave-trade, in which Plug-Ugly iriore is known to bear her part most gallantly. The intense Pro-Slaveryism of that city cannot, then, be traced to tt deep interest in bipedal property, nor to an} care about insurrection, nor to fltij sincere'colorphobia i It is simply the sign of a, cemie. It is aristocratic to be Pro-Slavery. Southernism has raised the standard and gage of socia condition absolutely and those who are so anfortunatc as not to be i. e. born at the given to feel that they mast eke out their short- comings with an extra amount of South- ern ardor and Pro-Slavery talk. Those large, fine residences around the monu- which that of J. Hanson Thomas is the Southern key- note and theme, and an apedom from all thirty-four paints of the compass gathers around lo choraljze most devout- ly. Those domicils reared by old Mary- land and Virginia rcions, or those who have intermarried with soch, and who have sold ihe inherited estates and ne- groes to splurge at the head of society in Baltimore, glitter before the eyes of every yoang man and woman of the city like visions of the blest. When good Baltimoreans die they go to Monument Square. The church element comes in here strongly. This Bpper-ttndora is generally Episcopalian but the largest church connection in Baltimore is the Methodist. This church is very old.and counts within ils pale many of the oldest an8 most aristocratic families. They have just enough of this latter element to wish and aim to have the Methodist church the aristocratic church of the city. The Baltimore Methodists were the first to innovate on tha old nsages which es- chewed pews nnd organs. This ambi- tion of theirs involves a Pro-Slavery attitude and there can be no doubt tha the immense influence of this popnla church in that city has been cast on thi side of the oppressor. Many of the! most eloquent ministers, e. g., Roszel Dashiel, have married into wealthy nnd aristocratic Southern families. W H. Milbnrn, "the Blind native of the South, a personal associate of the bogus Vice-president Stephens and others of thnt ilk, and a bitter Pro- Slavery partisan, lived in Baltimore at one time, and did all he could to force Uist feeling. So the aristocratic part o the Methodist church aspires to go be- yond monument Square in the sine qua .non of Baltimore gentility. Many ol ihe New-England residents have surrend- ered to this feeling. Most of the Uni- tarians of that city are ol New-England antecedents, and of course they could not go into any eirole less elegant and wealthy than that to which they were accustomed at home. The Rev. Dr. Buruap, who was for more than twenty pastor of tbe Unitarian Church of Baltimore, told me that he eonld not preach on Freedom even in the abstract: "To do he said, "would be drawing a razor from ear to ear on my church." Among these were the Browns, of which Mayor Brown is a specimen. These classes have their newspaper The Sun represents the large Methodistic mass who aspire to be the leaders of so- ciety. The American represents the Monnment-square aristocracy par excel- lence. Let no one be deceived about drawing-room, kid-gloved folk, im- agining them te be persons of high col- ftore or breeding; they are not nearly so j tnach so as the CharleRtonians they are 'Without trne earnestness; jost-such a gig-gentility as Carlyle would in the name of the real Aris- toL j IB Henry May and J. P. Kennedy represent this class. They are men who wish to keep a qnnsi Union for Ibe sake of .s pleasant dinner-table con-j with the wealthy and literary who would recent as blot on th< ir eecqtchcon charge df besng in favor of tbe Union, as including tjfee pocsib'lky of ever agnin R ''.Block Republican President." "They are-superficial and, untrustworthy Winter is the. only inMarice I 'have ever of in Mirjland where of relationship has had coornjre 
                            

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