Friday, November 3, 1922

Bridgeport Telegram

Location: Bridgeport, Connecticut

Page: 37

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Text Content of Page 37 of Bridgeport Telegram on Friday, November 3, 1922

Bridgeport Telegram, The (Newspaper) - November 3, 1922, Bridgeport, Connecticut t THE BRIDGEPORT FRIDAY, NOVEMBER ELEVEN HOW SNOWDRIFT IS MADE By L. A. (JELB IN SEPTEMBER the fields of the South were white with cotton and cheerful darkies were slowly shuffling down the long rows, picking the snow- white bolls. If it weren't for that cotton crop we'd be hun- gry people this year. In its way that cotton crop is as necessary as the wheat crop of the great Northwest, if be a wholesome, well-fed nation. Cotton seed supplies something moro than a third of all the fat we eat. More than a billion poands a year. We'd be hungry people if it weren't for that cotton crop. Does it seem odd to think of cotton in connec- tion with cooking fat? Or trees in connection with sugar? Nature is very generous. We get maple sugar and syrup from a tree that may some day be the boards on our kitchen floor. We get a delicious, wholesome fat from a plant that may give us our gingham apron, too. Cotton is one of the most important food crops in this country. When the cotton is picked it is taken to the gin, Eli Whitney's great invention, where the seed is picked out from the long, white fibre. The white cotton is baled and shipped off to the mills to be woven Into cloth for the outside us, and the seed to the "crusher" to become food for the inside of us. The cotton seed, as it cornea from the gin, is 'small and gray and looks a bit like a pussy- willow bud because of the short cotton fibre that clings to the outside. It is put into an ingenious machine where tiny knives scrape off this "lint" from the hull or shejl, and, thoroughly scraped, the cotton seed is like a little, dark brown nut. These seeds, or nuts, are cracked so as to get at the kernels or rich with oil, and then we great ket- tles so that the oil can be easily pressed out. This job of cooking the "moats" is quite a skillful one. In our Company we're as proud of some of our old, experienced cooks as a good hotel might be of its chef. There is an opportunity for judg- ment and skill in this cooking and it makes a difference in the product. When the meats are cooked, they are placed In huge hydraulic presses and the rich molasses- colored oil is squeezed out. The quality of this oil will vary considerably'. Cotton seed, for instance, is no more uniform than wheat or corn or any other crop. All tho apples even from the same tree aren't going to be exactly alike and each ejcactly as good as the next. The quality of oil will vary u- ble isn't with Snowdrift, it is with that can. You've probably had an occasional jar of your own leak and the contents spoil. Once in a while a Snowdrift can doesn't stay airtight and ihe Snowdrift is no better than if it were packed >n an ordinary tin or bucket. Take that ran to your grocer and get a can of real Snowdrift with our and good as jthe day it was made. In the early days a truly airtight can wasn't i convenient, but the goodness of frenh Snow- SOLD waa wortn the bothcr to lhc mostl hnate can. Now, in our constant effort to do [ything we can to make Snowdrift a perfect iing we've even improved the can, so it is right convenient to open and still keeps Adrift fresh. fiat's the whole story of making Snowdrift. e choicest vegetable the Wes- vay to a purity and goodness we do not ire is attained by any ftther cooking jgen added to a bit of reamy per cent, pure, rich, in a truly airtight can, it when you get il in your kitchen it is and fresh and good as the day it was full strength until xised. The special piocess of manufacture Is the reason. You use less i jtfa 1 m m (Vi 'M A TO ii fl >iY I 'U} 'J. V y i PWSPAPFRI