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Bridgeport Telegram Newspaper Archive: January 11, 1918 - Page 1

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Publication: Bridgeport Telegram

Location: Bridgeport, Connecticut

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   Bridgeport Telegram, The (Newspaper) - January 11, 1918, Bridgeport, Connecticut                              Largest Morning Circulation '.THE WEATHER Fair See Bottom First Column VOL. LIT. KO. BRIDGEPORT, CONN., JWIDAY CHINING-, JANUARY TWENTY CENTS. PLAN TO PROVIDE RIFLE PRACTICE IN HIGH SCHOOLS kgree to Lop Off Three Hours Daily Except on Saturday Open ai A. M., Close at P. M. Beginning Monday. Meeting the direct challenge >f the churches of Bridgeport, he liquor interests of the city uivc come out with a straight iiove to co-operation in the general move for fuel economy. a meeting of the Bridge- port Liquor Dealers' and Saloonkeepers' association held yesterday afternoon, it was to curtail the business Biours of ail places controlled Bav the association by three I iours each every saloon Practically C., -'an. of plans lor pro- viding rifle. practise in all liiii-Ii sehools of Ihe country recommended to-day by (he National Board for the ol' llit'le PrnolHo. '.I'lii- boiird also recorded ils that every effort should be made (o thoroughly instruct forces of the service in 4he proper use of the rifle and that so f'tr as practicable such instructions .vbould be com- pleted prior to overseas Another recommendation of the board was that a badge for marksmanship be provided for the men of the national army as well as for those of the regular army and national guard. it, BRITAIN REJECTS AMENDMENT TO GIVE WOMEN VOTE cafe in the the control anization. day. and :ity comes within or scope of the Following a plea received in a letter from the local fuel commit- tee, the Liquor Dealers' association met yesterday afternoon to con- sider the problem of fuel conserva- tion. By a voluntary action, it was decided by those present to restrict the hours of the saloons. By the schedule arranged yesterday, all saloons in the Liquor Dealers' or- ganization will open at a. m. and close at p. m. On u relay nights, the saloons and cafes j will remain open until midnight. Saves Fuel Light. The new schedule brings about n saving for fuel conservation and purposes of one hour and u the. morning, and a like ---cried at The- loss which t'r.e liquor men must boar by their of yesterday is a consid- ov.e. inasmuch n.s the earlv r and the evcnr.iir hours ar3 r the most profitable ones for i. saloons. c-r.i ricd by the voluntary action io-' saloon men, locr.l Adminis- Sienior. is now anticipating from the theatres. Up" to pvef if1-.? letter of Mr. Siemon. in lie sugpe.-U-d that all c-ne eveniiT-r .show, are the Secretary Baker An- nounces that Commis- sions in Non-Combatant Arms Are Barred to Get More Names. Washington, Tan. men placed in class one of the selective service will not be given commissions in the non- combatant arms of the serv- ice under a resolution adopt- ed by the Avar council and ap- proved to-day by Secretary to-day bv Baker. AU Must s-'iplit. It is the announced purpose of the war department to draw fisrht- inf? men from this class of rcsis- trants and the-department is said to be determined to prevent further inroads upon the nation's fighting matciiul for staff positions unless j there is a substantial reason for ox- i coption in individual cases duo to :it the only places to an- qualifications of the mon on Page Kiyht) Pic! Camp Devens, Aycr, IMass.. Jan. 10. Burby of nil Lafayette sliect, Bridgeport, was. among tlie four Connecticut selcc- tives chosen as lidditionai candi- dates'for the officers' training school now in session at the liar- racks of the depot brigade. Tho latest selections were to iill the school to capacity us the orig- inal scheduled numbers. Burby reported immediately to the Kchool the other men chosen. The other Connecticut men came from ,TVaterbury and New Canaan. Night and day training started in this camp to-night and from now on soidicrs in this division are going to work, in two .shifts, in a rush job to complete a system of trenches. Kvery one full company will be sent out wUh 3m-ks and shovels to work an liour night, getting back, to liar- racks at o'clock in the morn- ing. YVKATHHK JIKI'OKT. Forecast: K us torn York and Southern Kngland: Fair Fri- da involved. Draft resist rants residing1 in l.'rids'eport i'es'j.st.crcd in an- other city on June and who will find it impossible to report to their Until local beards for the physical ex- aminations which will probably bs held in February arc called upon to proceed as follows in obtaining transfers to one of tho local di- vision boards of liridgeport: Go to Nearest Jioard. A registrant, who -is so far dis- tant from his home when called to report to his local beard for physical examination or when, his physical examination is imminent, as to make it a hardship for him to g-o to so report, may. fit his own expense, request of his local hoard by mail or telegram permission to bo examined by the nearest medi- cal advisory board. L'pon receipt of such a request the local board shall mail to the ref-astrant an or- der to report to such medical ad- visory board for examination, and to tho medical advisory board a request that he be so examined. Thereupon the medical advisory board shall examine the registrant, fill out a form in respect of him and forward all copies to the local board which will then pass upon the physical qualifications of the registrant and notify him of ils ac- tion in the usual manner. In rejvai'd to 1be transfer of classification of any registrant it has been ordered, that any reiris- itrant who i.s so far distant from his local board us to make it a I ha rd'-hip for him to respond to land comply with notices and re-j qu'-remenls, and to perform any ,r duties under Orders of Superintendent Eedgate Require Men to Like Re- Fa- voritism Waning. Latest developments in the iron rule campaign of Superin- tendent John H. Rcdgatc that seems to" have descended on the Bridgeport Police depart- ment in all sections impartial- ly, last evening pointed to the traffic department, under the supervision of Captain Charles A. Wheeler. By the orders of Superintendent Eedgate, men in Captain "Wheeler's depart- ment will, under the new regime, be '.'steel as regular patrolmen am I will be accorded no more .privileges fthan the patrolmen in this city. By the new orders that have been issued traffic officers will ba obliged to report every .hour and will bo listed tho same as regular patrolmen with the desk lieuten- ants where they formerly reported only to the trallic department. Like TU-g'tilar Patrolmen. Humors around Police head- quarters last evening coming- from reliable sources had it that the head of the Police department h-as issued orders that in the future patrolmen of the traffic bureau will bo listed every hour the same as the ordinary policemen where they formerly did not have to re- port except twice each day to the traffic department. Previously the. traffic bureau pa- trolmen after taking their posts as trallic oflicci-s worked their regu- lar and thorn took an hour rest or whatever time they wished, and as they did not have to report every hour no one was the wiser. 'To-day with Superinten- dcn Rodgate, tha highest official in Bridgeport policedom, every- thing is changed and the traffic of- ficers will 'now only be accorded a -10 minute rest after each shift, wliL.o they formerly took their own time about reporting again for duly. Tjoiidoii, House, ol' fjords to-day reject cd Lord bum's nuie.ini- metit ft) the. representation of the people bill by which it was sought to exclude, woman from (he suffrage. the amendment WHS .184 to The now franchise bill lu> t'oi-e (ho House ol! Lords rc- vealcil strong opposition to woman suffrage. Karl Jjore- Imru moved to omit the clause from the bill giving women tho parliamentary vote. Ai'ter a two dajs' tlcbat.o the anieiid- ineul; wns Tho debate showed one im- portant convert to foe, wo- men's cause in ihe Kishoj) of London. But Karl Lore-burn, the Marquis of Lansdowne, Haron Vittlay and Kai'l strongly opposed placins1 the names of million women on tliu voting Resents Asks for Removal of U. S. siares Fuel Administrator As-1 Committee that j art Will Havej Coal Supply Commen- surate with City's In- dustrial Importance, Bridgeport is at last get fac- Board Also Hears of Com- plete Motorization of Department and East: Side Congratulates. Announcing a new -plan for fire protection on the East Side by making a hose -wagon into a chemical truck without adding any more men and the motorizing of the saying- fire department wotud save building new fire houses for the next 10 years, the fire com- missioners organized last night The new orders also state that traMic ofliecrs will work until a.ch evening where they once quit or tho night at 6 o'clock and rc- pc'rted at I'olico headquarters and were discharged at o'clock from the office of Captain Wheeler. Tbis sudden change in the traffic bureau did not como as a suprisc to those at headquarters who wci-c on the inside of- the po- lice politics as they have been played by the present administra- tion. AVith Superintendent Rcdgatc ma fie tho head the department and the highest appeal in all cases with tho police commissioners on- ly being accorded the power of taking up executive work, every- thing has been, changed and tho latest development is only one of many that is expected under the new regime. for the year. Mayor B Wilson presided and John A'. Leonard was unanimously re-elected president of the u uudlu- n When asked if he woula accept, Mr. Leonard answered, "I do, with pleasure, mayor.'' The mayor Ihcn spoke on the motorizing of the department, congratulating tho heads of the department in having :naniel 'E. Johnson for chief of lite. lire department. Mayor Wil- Kon spoke as follows: "The department will be com- pletely motorized in a very short time, and I believe it will then be in better condition than ever it was and far more efficient. That strides for greater efficiency in the department' have been .made may be seen even to the casual Two I'1- to an allotment of coal for tories and homes commensu-; rate with the city's industrial importance. The coal is to come to this city as a result o. a direct order front the United States Fuel Administration, and is to consist of a section oi 500 carloads of bituminous coal shipped to New England j daily, as well as 1200 tons of i anthracite daily, lor this city alcnc. Return Capital. This announcement was made last night, at a meeting- of .Bridgeport Hclici' committee, which i.s assisting- the local i'ucl committee in providing- I'ucl for the factories and homes of Bridge- port. The delegation, led by May- or Clifford li. Wilson and President C. .K. Hilton, oi the association, which returned yester- day after a trip to the national capital, reported what had been accomplished by conferences witfi the Fuel A.-lministration officials. An order issued by the Fuel Ad- ministration, which became effec- tive on Tuesday, instructs specific coal operators at the mines in L'ennsylvania to load and ship car- lot) ds 'of bituminous coal, a.g-grc- g-atins- 500 carloads daily to James J. Storrow, fuel administrator i'oi New ihipland. This will 'contin- ue daily until further orders. Ad- ministrator Storrow, through State Administrator Thomas W. Russell, and thence through the local fuel committee, will consign portions of consignment New York, Jan. Nearing, who has been dismissed from the faculties of two universities for his radical views and who is now chairman of the national executive committee of the Peoples Council of America1, announced to-night that he had called upon President Wil- son and Attorney General Gregory to remove from office Thomas D. McCarthy, United States Marshal for the southern district of New York. Marshal McCarthy attended a meeting of the Peoples Council Tuesday night at which he expressed most freely his opinion of Nearing and his associates. 'I am going to put it to you Mr. McCarthy is quoted as having said, "you are just the kind of bird I want to get. If I ever do get you I will send you so far that you will be a long time getting back. One thing more. If this war lasts much longer there may be hemp picnics in Central park on Sunday mornings for just such as you. People won't stand for your veiled disloyalty. They will take you out and hang you to the handiest tree. _ It wih be my job as an officer of the law to prevent that'if I can. But I don't mind telling you that if I were not an officer of the law, sworn to prevent disorder, I would stand on the fringe of the crowd and clap my hands.''________________ omen are by ory Anticipate Success in Sen- ate Although Result Is in New. Campaign to Insure Passage. Washington, Jan. by. federal So Says Chaplain on U. S. B. Texas In Spams American Elks with Patriotic Ad- dress. Seattle, Wash., Jan. C. GillT mayor ot! Seattle, was barred to-day by the stato board of bar examiners from practicing law in the state of Washington for one year. To-day's decision -wan reached following a hearing of charges that the mayor allowed the law linn of Gill. Hoyt Fryo to u.ie his name in soliciting police court business. sutirage ob- for I'irf-i Carload Coming-. The llrst DOO-carload con.sign- mciit slartad on Wednesday for Now and it is at present (lie transfer points at Jersey AVechawkeu, to along the New Haven rail- ,.otla- to cfties in Connecticut and Maspachusctts. js uiiotlicially stated, accord- ing- to .Local Adminislrator ycstcr- day, that ISO carloads each day wni be Connecticut's lot. The lo- Cal .committee, with the complete assistance of tho joint civic and Sit- dustriat committee, will follow up closely all shipments, and will make strong endeavors to draw at least half of the Connecticut ship- merit to Bridgeport. The mattcr will be taken up this morning with and Mr. Russell, tho "If we want peace we must lick the Kaiser and we must lick him good and. plen- declared Rev. Harry W. Jones, A. M., D. D... during the course ol: a brilliant patriotic lecture which he delivered last j night to the members of j Bridgeport lodge of Elks at the Elks' home in State street. "The only way in which I can possibly describe the kaiser is to say that he is said' 'Rev. Dr. ,'Jones, "and the only place which will be loft for that, jigger after this war is over is hell. May- be he won't even be able to get in I here because the devil doesn't want, anybody around who might possibly rival him. 7vTaybe instead ol' the fabled 'wr.ndcrinp; Jew' we will have a 'wandering kaiser.' Praises ".'Mei-rimac'' Heroes. The clergyman, who -vas a chap- lain on the U. S. S. Texas during the Spanish-American war, do-- scribed vividly the blockade work of Iho "United Slates navy before Santiago, and declared that the splendid spirit displayed by the of- ficers and sailors of the. United States navy in those days is the eutral ar. .Saturday snow. local The extreme southwest, disturb- j of Wednesday is in that vicinity, but tin oft- has moved Io xii'emo south- v.'ith in iii'.--nsil v whilu west t i !V government Servjee and those- ions, that there will be ive his classi lica- cc to 1 I all future: procedure, in of transferred to local board, and with such evidence :ts he cares Io submit. Questionnaires. li.-c.s wlni registered in hut who :i re now re- have. cxplain- Irai't ollieials that they r  board of four to investigate the wages de- nds of Ihn railway brother- hoods. The representatives hiivc siilmiiHed a. list, of :iliout 1.: names of men Io 1iv..iii il was said to-niyht, anO two be chosen from this list. at largo and (ire fighting forces placed on a defi- nite and practical working basis, it will tend to promu'u: content- ment among: the individuals, and this, too, will show itself in greater effort and efficiency. "I congratulate you upon the discipline in the department. Tit all departments placed semi or wholly on a military basis, per- sonal feelings may crop out, but this, I must say, is entirely elim- inated. Tho city of Bridgeport employs only men who aro compe- tent and capable and it expects them In do their duty. congratulate the hoard find city upon your re-election, Mr. Leonard. That is all T have to say at this lime." Kxpect Mn.'i'incs Soon. Mayor 'Wilson inquired ho-v many miles of wire is now under- ground and was told 23, and Pres- ident Leonard informed the mayor that practically all inside the .city limits were taken care of by un- derground, Leonard al- so informed the, mayor ami other members of the board that four pumping engines ordered from n. St. Paul concern might be expected this year and two of them may be in '.Bridgeport In-fore February 1. Ho said a telegram was sent to HI. Paul yesterday about them, telling the company that if a rdangemer ts could be made Io ship to Xew Vo.-k or Springfield, Mass., the com- missioners would see they were brought in Bridgopnrf. This would save delay in transportation. fMiairni'rin Leonard told the members t ho depart menl would lie entirely uiol orixed before the (inrl of Ihe'fiscal ycH-r. It was surpris- ing, he said, the fire area that could be covered by motor appar- atus 'and it looks now as though there will be no need of tire houses in I'.ridgeporf for the next ten yea's. Larger cities have discard- ed lire houses and put in motor drive appa ratus. Xew Chemical. President UMinnrd said il on I'agc Uiglil) Coumiflcc.'s At Uic Rolicf committee's mect- in omces Of Iho Chamber of Commerce, hist night, a nf tliR committee's doings at Walshington was presented by George M. Karncs, one of the com- mittue. Tho report tells exactly what was accomplished by Bridgc- port's representatives at the tional capital. It. is complete as follows: "Your committee beg leave; to report that, they arrived in Wash- ington ".Yednoselay morning, ,lnn- uary nth, and found in Iho holol lobbies and elsewhere hundreds others who had come to 'on the same mission from the Statos aud worn advised we would have dm.culty ,n 'ft a Kfeenn, M H, ,mV p.-o- appmnl- jr. ono (J. ;issis. lls (llo part atle'lttion; ;-nd ,ls (hat the eonelilion hail received spcc'al ,.mts o] attention r.f Iho I''. K. Kuel Admin- istration the week previous, and that special orders under date of January li had been issued Io go into effect ,'l.mu.iry Klh, which -..'as the- day before we. arrived, a ropy ot' which orders we lio.rewilh sub- mit. This order comprehends an emergency supply of fiOO cars of bituminous coal by rail I'or use of Ihe Xew Kiigland .Slates, and it is already on tho way 1 in .'lames ,T. fUorruw. V'uel minisli'iitnr I'or Now Knglnml. "lie. further advised us il. is quite in order for us through effoi-l-. to ascertain require- ments, and to present (hem im- mediately Ilirntigli tho local mid sta.te administrators in order Hint we should receive our share of (his urgency .supply. pa rl icula rh" as rhe fuel adini uist ratien nf Nrw Kngland in request msr tins (Continued on Middlctown, Jan. death, list in the lire which swept the west wing of tho Connecticut Hospital to-day remains at two with Iwo other patients mi to-night. The damage to1 tho building and contents is now esti- mated at. JL'OO.OOO and the cause of the lire, is .still Io bo. determin- ed. To-night Iho surviving pa- tients of the burned wing are safe- ly housed in other sections of the hospital, an operation was perl'ormoel wit lu.nl panic or injury to any one. Oiticinls at (lie hospital gave out the names of three men which in- clude thai fit' one of Ihe dead and Ihe two who are. missing. Owing to the impossibility of jl-e Keermd be-dy re m (he ruins it is not certain at this time which the three is t'.iej man. Tho names maeio pub- iie are': Herb-'-rt A. Maltoon. admitted; Xeivontber 20. Mis son lives! ai I -I Monroe streel. I l.i rtfeird. Teutons to Transfer Peac Negotiations -with sheviki Theirs and Bulgaria Use Swiss SoiS for Peace Pact. With Leon TroUky insist- ing upon a removal of the peace conference to Stockholm instead of Brcst-Litovsk, the Germans may demand that the conference be held in Switzer- land where the separate peace agreement between Russia and r.nlgaria was signed. Trotzky would go to Sweden. but lately Switzerland has been mentioned as most likely to be the mediation or neutral ground selected finally for the peace parlours. for Switzerland. Unoflicial despatches dealing with the deliberations between the Bolshcvilu and the Teutonic allies at Brcst-Litovsk indicate that for the present peace is not being dis- cussed but that the proposition of the llolsheviki to change the pcene ot' tho negotiations to Stockholm is the paramount issue. (he l.-iolshcviki foreign minister, is said to have, threatened the dele- gates of the Central powers that if they do not accede to his request for'a t ran at'CM- of the pourparlers to Sweden the voice of their own peo- ple aud the strong arm of the: Rus- sian democracy will be felt by .them. The German delegates in have requested that Switzerland act as go-between with the Allies. A despatch emanating from Woman. constitutional amendment won in the House to-night with, exactly the required number of affirmative votes. While members in their seats and throngs in the galleries wait- ed with eager interest the House adopted by a vote of 27-i to 136 a resolution provid- ing for submission to the states of the so-called Susan B. Anthony amendment for na- tional enfranchisement of women. But for the promise of Speaker Clark to cast his vote from the chair for the resolution if it' was' needed, the change of a. single vote to the opposition would have meant defeat. Republican Leader who came from a Baltimore Hospital where he has been under treatment ever since Congress con- veiieel, and Representative Sinas ol Tennessee, just out of a sidk bed and hardly able to walk to his seat, brought the votes which, settled the issue. Doubtful In Semite. The Ho'iisc hardly had adjourn- cd before the suffrage champio'na began their light for favorable ac- tion on the Senate side of the capitol. Recent polls there have- indicated -that the necessary two thirds vote could not be mustered, but encouraged by- the house vie- tory and counting- upon influence of President Wilson who came to- their support last night, the suf- fra.Hsts hope to bring the Senate j into line sn as to have the amend- ment before state legislatures, dur- inu' (be coming year. They feel j at least, of forcing a vote in. senate before the present ses- sion ends. Advocates of the1 amendment been supremely confident of the result the house after Presi- dent Wilson advised the members who called upon him last night to support it. They were so corifi-- d'-nt. that the close vote was re- ceived with and some (Continueil oil Kight) XJK ays artinent id Well (Continued l-'.iu-ht) Whole Town Wiped l-'rc'derick Allen. April. If) 111. sou of fii-org of M id-Mel own. Sam Pr.'giedunc, .lime L'L'. P.M7. An '-lie relatives. fr.iiu ci-liiiry admit I, Allen, l-'cu-f Smith, Ark., .Ian. 10.---The powder and dynamite plant in I Patterson. Okla., was blown up .r> noon to-day and according to 1 meagre messages there has bee a heavy loss of life. The 'operator of the Missouri, ami Texas railroad in Pat- i tcr--on wired that Ihe town had d i IK en out. lie feared the loss of life would bo groat, lie said. The explosion rocked 1he mining town of I'.okoshe, IS miles no U-d of Furl Smith. In Crow of Fort. Smith, every pli window was broken. STOCK i SKAT I-'OSJ Now York. 1 0. Ac ilio New York Stock was iMi.-ted to-ilay for Max emi'los'od west west -lass '.t on Ira us. for to I'or !v year-; r -i wa Washington, Jan. phase of tin: "War department's preparations for battle against Ger- many was outlined and defended bv Secretary Baker to-day before the Senate military committee. He answered those who have criticized the department during the com- mittee's investigation, with the, as- set-lion that, no army as that now under the American flag- ever had been raised, equipped or trained so quickly, and that never before had such provision been made for the comfort and health of an army. Questions Are Numerous. The secretary read an exhaustive prepared statement when he took the stand, and was not interrupted until it was concluded. Then ques- tions began to ily from every side of the committee table, launching a cross examination that was not concluded at adjournment to-night and probably will continue all day to-morrow. Chairman Chamberlain, and oth- er commit toe-men wanted to know particularly alunit delays in fur- nishing machine guns and rifled i and mudi auention was devoted to 1 CMC army's t-upply purchasing- sys- ;..m. Mr. i'.tkor admitted there h.-ul been some mistakes -and de- lays. declared that all ir.lr mon in France wore adequately equipped and armed, and that aH sent over would be. lie took full. i for delay in approv- 1 nig a marine gun, holding tlv.U i the value ..f tho Browning gun 1 u.iw developed was worth it. Mo also said superior weapon o'o- i-tiuc-d by liavini: the British En-. lirld rille re-oh'.uiibered for AmerU can aro.mn'ii-.iou (.-ompfnsa'.ed for- the. di lay t 'aero. 1 .Mi is Older Avm.s. Mure ih'. n 1. 00.0 OD Americans aro now under arms, .Scci'otary Baker said ai.d an army of s'.ib- 1 is 'U Francw for si.Tvicc. sli.-r.- o1' the committoe were in ihi.ii' ot; tho s.x.'-lem of did not sluika of however. ,M i' es.-0'liial to ooneorning plants eiiiiaiicd war work..   

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