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Bridgeport Telegram Newspaper Archive: January 2, 1918 - Page 1

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Publication: Bridgeport Telegram

Location: Bridgeport, Connecticut

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   Bridgeport Telegram, The (Newspaper) - January 2, 1918, Bridgeport, Connecticut                              Largest Morning .Circulation in THE WEATHER Fair See Bottom First Column VOL. L1Y, XO. 7-1. BRIDGEPORT, CONN., WEDNESDAY .MORNING, JANUARY 2, 1918. EIGHTEEN CENTS. REOPEN TO-DAY; NEW ENGLAND Suspicions Blaze Hits Wipes Out Two Business Blocks, Does 000 Damage, Kills Three, Injures Score Enemy Aliens Arrested. Norfolk, Va.. Jan. ly two blocks in the heart of (Norfolk's business district in- cluding the Monticcllo hotel destroyed, three men were killed and a score more injured in a series of explo- sions and fires to-day both the police and naval au- thorities believe were incen- diary. The fire had been check- ed to-night, but still was burn- ing fiercely in the ruins. The loss is roughly estimated at inore than Three distinct explosions In as many buildings, one after the fire  street. The .situation in the schools, of tho oily is satisfactory. Thero a good supply of coal OP. hum! in all the schools, with the exception (if and hero a Miliii'iont supply is: available- In last for at least !wo weeks. New shipments an; ex- inmifdiaU ly. Tho. dealers of l.iriiigt.-.p'irt havu hr-cn more than fair with (he schools of tin1 city, and rfupci iiUi'iident s'-.l( that conditions at tin.: present time arc uuilc satisfactory. Washington, Jan. return to a normal sugar supply for the nation is not likely to be long de- ferred, the food administration an- nounced to-night in outlining plans under which an increased allot- ment of sugar will bo made to con- fectioners and manufacturers of non-essential food products con- taining sugar. The 50 per cent, allotment to which confectioners were limited tlii) sugar shortage became acute in October, will be increased to SO per' cent, when the supply tgain becomes normal, it was an- nounced, but continuance of this ratio will depend upon efforts of manufacturers to reduce the su- gar content of confectionery and soft drinks by substituting other sweetening materials. Through a misunderstanding food administration oflicials in New York last week announced re- finers already had been instructed to increase the allotment to con- fectioners to SO per cent and the full pre-war allowance would be made when conditions had return- ed to normal. It was explained to-night that the. maximum allot- ment'would be 80 per cent, ot nor- mal ami that all manufacturers -.vjtild be required to reduce the sugar content of their products as far as possible. "The "iO por e.nt. limit has worked but. little hardship on the manufacturers conl'oetionery and sweet said tins food adminisi rat ion's amuMincemiuit, "as they had on hand supplier su f- licient 'to keep their plants work- ai almost normal capacity for several months. 'It did, er, henelit. the sugar supply in gen- eral by 1ho possible, ac- cumulation of larger quantities Hum were necessary tor immediate 700 TONS ARRIVE I With the authority given bv the United States Fuel Ad- ministration to State Adminis- trator Thomas W. Russell to commandeer whatever emer- gency coal supplies are neces- sary for the munitions factories of Bridgeport, all factories who are faced with a shortage of coal were able to start as usu- al this morning, and the situa- tion in this city has been tem- porarily relieved. It is "believed that the govern- ment ofllcials have recognized and appreciated the situation with the many factories of this city occu- pied on government contracts, and prompt and regular action on a. supply of soft coal to Bridgeport is looked for. 700 Tons Arrive. The arrival in this city yesterday of a single barge of coal, rushed to its destination in spite of im- pediments of ice and cold, has relieved the most pressing needs for coal among the factories. The l 700 ton cargo of this single barge will go to the Locomobile factory, which was in tho most serious' plight for want of fuel, and all factories which shut down on Sat- urday or Monday because of a. coal shortage resume operations this morning. P3ach plant has a supply on hand sufficient to last a week. Carl F. Siemon, chaii man of the local fuel committee, who has been in almost constant communi- cation with State Administrator Russell on tho situation here, an- nounced last night that efforts wero being mado to rush other bargas to Bridgeport, and ho ex- pected a reinforcing- supply to- day. Two or throe barges are somewhere oil the sound, bound for this city, according to Mr. Sie- mon. Particular efforts will be made to clear the way of ice and other impediments for these ves- sels. Plants Reopen. The Locomobile Company of America, the American and Brit- ish Munitions company, the Bry- ant "Electric company, the Siem.on Hard Rubber corporation, the IT. O. C'anfiold Rubber company, and the Spring Perch company, the fac- tories which closed on Saturday and Monday because of the coal shortage, start as usual tlii.s morning. All have, coal enough on hand to last about R week. and each will continue, confident that the alarming situation will be reduced by the government au- thorities, to whom telegrams of appeal wore directed on Monday J. A. Kingman, of the Locomo- bile company in this city. said last night, in a statement fo Telegram, "The Locomobile tory opfii to-morrow. have a few days' supply or: hand. Tho situation is serious, but not immediately so." Than "Week's Supply. John C. Stanley, of the- Ameri- can and i-lritish company, an- nounced. "The Amerioan and T'.ritish company will open to-mor- row as usual. Wo havu less than a week's supply of eoal on hand, but we are hoping for immediate relief. The situation is still sorl- ous. have been getting our COAB TRAINS MOVE Jan. trains went forward to-day under new government orders based on the belief of Director General McAdoo that railroad congestion rather than actual shortage is responsible for the fuel famine in many districts. Upon receipt of reports that hundreds of loaded coal cars were stalled on sidings behind long string.1? of cars containing1 ship- ments of higher preferential ratingl than cc.'al, all existing priority or- ders for the entire country were suspended by Jlobert S. Lovett, priority director of the War. In- dustries Board, on recommenda- tion of the director general. -This' is expected to result in quicker. movement of the mass of cotigrested freight whose sluggishness haa been caused largely by a city of priority'orders. "Use Pasgcngvr Tubes. Director General McAdoo.spent a busy Now Year's day. He broke railway preccndents by ordering that tho Pennsylvania compajhy'a tunnel under the Hudson river, heretofore restricted to passeflgen trains, be used to hasten coal .sup- plies into tho heart of New Yorls city. The orders are to ber-fpl-; lowed, even if they interfere -wita passenger schedules. This action was considered .sig-" niMeant by railroad men not ;only. because of direct results but cause it indicated how determined the government is to use all fa- cilities to their utmost, of previous practices, to congestion and promote efficiency. Add Coul Ships. At the first conference of MeAdoo in the new year with. advisors and executives, it cided to put additional controlled by the shipping -board into service carrying coal from! Hampton Roads to New England.- The number of vessels -which cani be spared will.be morrow and they wiH bet immediately to the service. Hundreds of telegram pourir.g! into the railroad administration told of coal trains or individual cars apparently lost in yard fusion. Theso reports, which were submitted by .Inter- stato commerce commission 'fn- speetors, wero referred to railway executives with instructions., .to clear out the stalled freight as-fast as physically possible and to notlf" the administration the of thr-i inability to move ccf.fiain cjiKMitities of freight. Knrly action to divide the coun- try into operating districts, with a government supervisor over each, and possibly a federal agent for carh state. has lwn ur.uod strongly upon Director McAdoo ami he is to be cA'i- si'irri'.it, this policy. Many telegrams which have reachedjhim in the last few days are from sons or organizations pointment of certain men to posi- tions which may be available when the director general decides on the form and personnel of his perma- r.ent 1'resident It was learned to-night, win go oefore Congress Friday to present his recommen- dations ;ror legislation to make K-overnment operation fully effec- tivi.: and to provide for compciisa- Tho oral fao- (Continued oil Pqgc Three.) (Continued ou Page   

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