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Bridgeport Standard Telegram Newspaper Archive: November 7, 1919 - Page 1

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Publication: Bridgeport Standard Telegram

Location: Bridgeport, Connecticut

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   Bridgeport Standard Telegram (Newspaper) - November 7, 1919, Bridgeport, Connecticut                               STANDARD TELEGRAM CAXXOX STREET Office Open AH Day and'Night, Tor News and Advertising. TEL. BAKNTOi 0100 THE WEATHER (For Detailed Report and Miniature Almanac See Pago 2.) Circulation Books Open to for Yesterday VOL. LV, NO. 155. Entered us second class matter at tto post Ottico at Bridgeport. Conn., under act at 5819. BRIDGEPORT, CONN., "FRIDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER Subscription by'mall 5ti cents a month; S'S for six months; 56 for one year. By carrier. 12 cents 'week. 28 CENTS., Boys of Yankee Appear Again In To Help.to JL AIMHQHY Veterans of World War Open Bazaar in Armory, Preceded by Street Cheer Volunteer Heroes and Other Crowfe See Presentation of Colors As Fair Appeals for Support for Veterans' Plan for Club House. For ths first time since their return last April, veterans of the Yankee division donned the "O.D.s" agam last take part in the parade which preceded the opening o he fair and bazaar which opened at the armory for the benefit of the Yankee Division building fund. The vets mobilized at the armory and, headed by Mayor wfknn and the Grenadier fife and drum corps of Milford, marched Jaw Main Sferfto State street and thence to the headquarters of the veterans of Foreign Wars where a halt was niade______ Other Soldiers Join. Hero the column Became more cosmopolitan with the addition ol membership of Raymond W. Harris Post. Veterans of FCH-- Wars, for in the ranks of that organization Canadian. Marine and' Kaval uniforms were plentiful as the olive of the Bridgeport Will Issue a General Appeal Today Calling for City-Wide Observation of Armistice Day Post Meets. Roumanian Queen Imprisoned By Mistake As Suspect on Sffiiss Border PARIS, Nov. Marie of Roumanla was among the sus- nects recently arrested on the Swiss'border, it was learned from Geneva today. The queen was a. prisoner for five hours, being confined to a waiting room in a .'border railway station. The cus- toms official wlio had mado ths arrest finally discovered his mis- take and released the royal pris- oner with profound apology. RECRUITING DRIVE GAINS AH Overseas Gold-Stripe Men Wanted in and Manufacturers to Be Asked to Close Half Day. almost as drab outfits men who saw service in France with organiza- tions other than the Yankee Divi- sion. The parade then swims ou- State street, 200 strong-, to Court- land street: thence to" Fail-field ave- nue- to Main street, and north on Main street to the armory. People crowded the curbs along I the line of march and clapped anil cheered the boys ns they passed with as much enthusiasm as when j the same company, with .the addi- tion of a score or more brave lei- -_._ lows who since laid down their fUKifb lives in France, marched to the rail- j nfWJN Tfl FARTH road station on July 28, 191 J. lUMtb DUW ft IV ZAtll H Mayor Asks TTelp. At the armory, Mayor! Wilson. .__________ introduced' by Commander Norman FS-eoS l'Br.onz Weather Vane Had Topped Christ Church Since Before on the purpose of the af- fair and appealed to the people 101- -heir hearty co-operation in making the thins a success that "these fcalph Greenieaf and His ager Arrested As Suspects Following Game on Warrant Issued by Coroner MX. KNEW MESSENGER'S PALS Police Believe Pair May Be Able of Clear Up Arrests Case in two Weeks. hu0 FROM TOP OF the Revolution. 11 -v-nv.- weathering the storms of. boys who two centuries, to say nothing vifie shots a fusillade o at it back in Revolutionary days. Stratford's historic. rooEter- the wuather vane on the su-eple of i it is hoped that, as Armistice Day is umr ni-.tiin-i r Tnrrn 1 f-o n ri f I you might now with the necessary funds to build a home and clubhouse where fired they can gather and find recreation 'and comfort In comradeship." the! Chris: Episcopal v we're once more "called early yesterday mor-nins. Him j and marched into for- winds which tore down telephone; for the presentation of the wires, broke off limbs of trees, and to the Yankee Division Vet- toppled down sign boards, also rip- association by the Veterans of pr-d off the fop 'of Christ "church i Wars The two organizations steeple on Main street, Stratford, j lined up on oposite sidfs of the drill j causing the weathercock to come i floor facing each other while a j hurling to earth. color ruerd, bearing a silk standard j The top of the steeple gave, war marched down the center and took at an early hour yesterday morning ItsT olaoe facing the YD men. The I when the streets of the town wore C C Kennedy, chaplain of Ray I deserted and though many peopio mmA Harris Post, V. of F. TV. con- heard the crash, no one was pass- ducted the dedication sen-ices as- jngi and only damage was to fisted by Lieut. Hargraves. j the steeple and the bronze rooster. Immediately after the presentation The old bird was some shaken up -----.-_ tjje uniformed men ijv jts jail, but was lifted into the basement of the church yesterday, will be hammered into shape again, and when the steeple is Mayor -Wilson will' issue proclamation today making No vember 11, Armistice day, a liol iday in Bridgeport, and urging all to observe it This actior will be taken following the resol ution passed several weeks ago by Post Raymond W. Harris Veterans of the Foreign War of the United States. Rush of Recruits., At a. meeting held last night by Post 2S new recruits were admitted. At the entiro organization par- aded with a detachment of the Yankee division and presented a set ot colors to the YD boys at the Armory. The -meeting was resumed at and reports were niodjo by I the several committees that are busy i on tho parade-, monster military iball I and mnmibetrfhlp drive. Aids Lashar announced that the booth at the Strafcfield wall be opened up to Saturday November S and -that u-p to the present several hundred new- members have been recruited. Five members volunteered to represent the five big allied nations and will hold a dress rehearsal Sunday even- ine. under the direction of Mrs. >x. Z. PoU. and others in charge of the (Sold Star Division. It is th? wish of the organization to have'in line all overse'a-gold- stri-pe .men regardless of wihe-ther or not they are memlbers ot the post. Ask General A resolution was passed by which GET SALLIED ULTIMATUM; FOREIGN VESSELS REFUSED MOVE TO RATIFY PACT BLOCKED ERMANY MUST KEEP BARGAIN BEFORE TREATY IS ENFORCED; MUST REPLACE SUHKEN SHIPS Motion for Ratification Without Reservation Made by Hitch- codf-Clamor for Roll Call from Both Sides. State Department Makes Public Notice Served on Germans bjsi Allied Powers Lust Represen- tatives Must Appear in Paris Nov. 10 to Make Final Arrangement. G. 0. P. SENATORS OBJECT Ralph Greenieaf, champion billiard player, and his manager George Wordon were arrested by State Policeman Frank Virelli in this city late last liirfif Claim It Would Cut off Later At- tempts for Reservations Chamber in Confusion As Un- derwood Accepts Challenge. nection with the murder of Benr jamin Binkowitz. The two men were taken to police headquar- ters and are being held, it is un- derstood, on a warrant issued at the request of Coroner Eli Mix of New Haven. A DRAMATIC SCENE. The arrest of the two men is the first to have been made in nearly two weeks, when the New York and Chicago authorities apprehended eleven persons charged with com- plicity in the actual-murder of the New York messenger on the-Milford turnpike, or as accomplices in dis- posing of the Liberty bonds valued at which ha was alleged to have stolen from Ills New York employers. Both G-reemeaf and -Gordo'n h.ive been in the city the past -twenty-four hours, Greenieaf appearing- at :i- looal billiard academy where he hag participating in a match game with another well known rbilllardist. The arrest of tlie player and mana- ger occurred shortly before 11 o'clock last night as they were leav- ing the academy. The young; cueist WASHINGTON, Nov. the. treaty with Germany without reservation or amendment seemed for a while this afternoon about to be decided by the Senate. Thrown into the thick of a drama- tic parliamentary battle, a request for an immediate show down on unqualified acceptance of the treaty got .Hie backing of the leaders on both aides, who seemed anxious to outdo each other in pressing for ft roll -call. But before the stage of action was reached the move was blocked by Republican Senators who objected that it might cut off any later attempt to put reserva- tions, into the ratification'. Back to Normal. Then the Senate got- back to. regular order of business .and hav- ing voted- down the last of the long list of proposed amendments, bfejrai work on the reservations' presented Country !s Burning Three Times As Much Coal As the Miners Are Out at Pres- ent. TO ELIMINATE TRAINS WASHINGTON, Nov. Notice was served on Germany by the Allied and associated powers in a note and accompanying protocol, forwarded last Saturday, that the treaty of peace would, not go into force until Germany -executes to the satisfaction of the j Discontinuance of Coal for For- Allied and associated powers obligations assumed under the armis- _ _ -i tice convention and additional agreements. Obligate Nation. The noto, mado'public -tonight by' the state department, provides thatx the German government shall send representatives to. 'Pans November make final arrangement's to.- the puttin? into effect of the treaty. But the' note specifies that before the. treity can bo made effective through a process verbal of the de- posit of the ratifications, tno Ger- man representatives shall oibligate their nation out the terms of the protocol. The protocol contains a number of obligations absumed by Germany in the "armistice convention and complementary agreements which Jiave not teen carried out and which have 'been the subject ot in, jnt representations. These include the withdrawal of German troops from HuttBiun territory, and the delivery, of .certain German tonnage. Must Replace Ships. Most important, however, in the olbUgatlons Germany is asked to as- sume under the protocol Is the submarine UC-48 off and the destruction in the North 9ja oJ cer- the for -ea5on committee: placing of vessels destroyed .at Scapa BIO.UU a __ said to have the backing of a ma- jority of the Senators, When a re- cess was taken until tomorrow, the by mirat'on of the large crowd that. i witnessed the match and his arrest, ti _ _.......__w__ _ coming as it did in the midst of ap- lesra'i holiday, merchants' and I preclativo applause and hand shak- mSi Tvas a dramatic climax to manufacturers should for nt leapt half a day. A letter will bo play. mailed to even" concern today fol- i Knew Bhikowitz Guns'. lowed by 11 personal call by members AccordlnR to wnat cmM be icsu.n- t'cl--c-U b-'ive bnen i ed alKmt the ca'se last.night the men soidfothTmfmary are held for complicity 1" connac- armv of decorators will to- at work tion witn disposing ot the stole Liberty bonds. Wordon s- home is startine today to transform the Casino Into .1. brilliant glittering ,-in New York city and ho is said to jhe acquainted with the alleged AND WOMAN ARE BADLY HURT IN CRASH ont of ths armorv, TiboaVs erehtrtn struck up a dance tune, the bariwre at tho booths beean K their vrares and. the armory wifl again be placed on its exalted oa the appearance of a mini- j perch. Several thousand dollars will Snfi'oi1 Concussion ot Brain When Motorcycle Skids and Hits Pole. committee pro- posals had not yet come to a vote. The reservations, got before the Senate only after a point of ordel against them had been overruled by Vice President Marshall, who de- c'iared no technicalities of the Sen- ate rules would be permitted to stand in the way ot the right of Hip Senate majority to frame its rati- fliyUion of the treaty as it chose. l-uling, which followed an hour of bitter argument, was accepted as containing a. significant declaration of policy with' respect to tho parlia- mentary tangle developing around attire Danbnry Fair. continued throughout the evening and the crowds about the ntimerous booths Indicated a suc- t cental start for the fair wMcn contmne until ths 15fh of the month. be required to re-pair the damage. Target or Kedcoats. original Christ Episcopal one of tha oldest, K not the oldest ATLANTIC OTY DATES FOR G. A. R. GATHERING The rooster has seven bullet holes in its side, testimonials to the markman- shlp of British redcoats who play- fully took pot shots at it In the course of the attack on tha Yanks CITY, N. J-, Nov. 1 in the town the same- tiay the town national encampment of nr FairSeld was sacked and burn- Williams, formerly of 'Bun- nell street, this city, -in company with Miss Evelyn Wulff of 092 King street, Stratford, are In t'.in St. Vin- cent's hospital suffering from non- '.cusion of this brain and probable fracture of the skull as a result of a motorcycle accident last night at Falr-fleld avenue and State street. I cipals in Blr.kowits case. The mention of Wordon In the case is the second pool and billiard champion manager to be brought out. It will be remembered that the "Billy" Smith, alias "One Eyed" Smith, who was one of the first to arrested through the activities of the Xew York police, Is said to be j no other than "Billy" Baker, alias i "Billy" Burwell, manager of Frank j Taberski, world's champion pocket billiard player. Burwell, ov Baker as he was known while managing Ta.berskl, v.'a.s' a witness in tha big the treaty. make up for the first class battle- ship sunk at'.Scapa Flow by turn- ing over floating docks and cranes, tug's and dredges equivalent to n total displacement of tons. In this respect the protocol 'declares: "The Allied and associated pow- ers cannot overlook without sanc- tion the other Inflvactfons t-omm-lt- tod against -tht armistice conventions and violations-as Berl'oua as the des- truction of the 'German fleet a.t Scapa, Flow, the destruction of the tain. submarines proceeding to Enffla-iid for delivery." Replacement of the submarines destroyed through 'the over of additional submarines and suib- machinery is provided. Other Provisions. Privisions the armistice asrce- ments a.nd peace treaty which tho protocol demands that G-erraaay ourry out are: Delivery of 42 locomotives and cars as yet not turned over. Delivery of all documents, specie, values and property and finance, with all issuing apparatus, concern- ing pirblTc or private interests in >the invaded countries. Delivery of additional agricul- tural implements in lieu of railroad material. Restoration of works of art artistic documents, and Industrial materials removed from French and Belgian territory and as yet not completely restored. Payment of tho oi aerial material exported to Sweden, Hol- eign Ships First Step To; wards CnrtalSfaient of portation Since Saturday. WASHINGTON, Nov. Still hopeful that court develop- ments at Indianapolis Saturday might point the way to an early ending of the coal'strike, eminent agencies nevertheless >ut forth renewed and more Jde- erminfed efforts today to protect :he public against distress almost certain from a protracted pension of "mining Realizing the country Is burning three times as much coal as tha miners are turning out, the railroad administration, through Its recon'tly. created central ooal committee, topk drastic action In ordering that the supplying of coal to foreign.owned, ships in American ports be Immediately. Eliminate Trains. calls for assistance from land and Denmark In violation of treaty terms. The protocol concludes with, ths following paragraph: "In case Germany sho.uld not ful- fill obligations within tho time specified, tho allied and asso- ciated powers reserve tha .right to have recourse to any coercive meas- ures 'or other -which they may deem appropriate." The couple attempted to pass an- other motorcycle driven by a friend and skidded on. the SOME DRASTIC ORDERS FOR CONSERVING COAL numtora of his frtaff and represen- j tatlrss of ths city. Ammfltcd, Idghtless Streeta of Veterans auxniary -xlll meet here at the same time. j OHIOAG-O, Nov. 6. New restrlc- tlons on use of soft coa.1 were j announced today, the elrth day of the miners' strike. In some locali- MAKING HOME IN tAYliOj ties orders were more drastic than Rpsenthal murder case, some years police officials feigned ignorance of the case, it was learned ofilcials handling the Investiga; tion believe they are in possession of considerable evidence connecting Wordon with some of the missing i bonds. So far as Breenleaf is ixm- cai ecrnefl it not be ascertained smashing the machine against n. ho bejng on a cliarge telephone pola. Both were tin-own mora Earlous thtto suspicion, tha to the ground. I authorities holding the opinion that MARYLAND DEMOCRATS Ijeaders a-t Sea. -Leaders were as much at sea as ever tonight over the date when a final' vote on the might be reached, but they declared every effort would be made to hasten-ac- tion. Democratic, Senators at evening conference, over I the whole situation and sought some -method of .bringing the long fight j 'luickiy lo a conclusion.. Meantime, White House officials vealed that plans wero oh. foot r an early conference between Wilsoii and Senator WIN BY FEW VOTES bonds. Elerven Arrests Jlafle. i Up to tha time of Greenlea.f's ar- BALTIMORH, Nov. 6. The i rest ]ajst nlght lt porEOns hafl pre- Democrata tonight are oonftdently claiming the election of Albert C. Ritchie, for governor over Harry W. RESIDENTS OF GAUCIA __________ during the war but the general sit- uation showed little change. BBB37I5. Nor. Inhabitants! sixty-six trains were annuled by of the destroyed villages in western j Chicago and Northwestern, and   fled the state. Other sus- pcclH arrested in the case deny thla, I Hitchcock of Nebraska, the Demo- cratic leader, regarding the Senate situation. It was said at the capltol tonight, however, that no such ap- pointment yet had been made or re- quested by >Ir. Hitchcock, wha thought several days might elapse before the reservation Tight became acute. Goro Amendment Del'cjUod. Tha flurry over an immediate vote on unreserved ratification came just'after the Senate- had 'voted down, 67 to 16, tho amendment by Senator Gore, Democrat, Oklhoma, to make any declaration of war un- der the league of nations contingent on a popular referendum. That cleared away the Ia-st. o-f the amend- ments, and Senator Lodge, of Massachuestts, the Republican lead- er, called up tho committee resor- One Dead, Many Injmred, in Crush to Get Bargains of Army Goods BUFFALO, N. T., Nov. One woman is dead a score of persons were injured and sev- srai others fainted hers today when a crowd of stormed the doors of an armory at a sale of United States army goods. Mrs. Emma Baumeister, 65 years old, who fainted in the crush, died in an auto-ambu- lance on the way to a hospital A riot call was necessary tj summon enough policemen to control the situation. WINERS SEEK RELIEF FROM THE INJUNCTION ON STRIKE ACTIVITY File Motion to Dissolve the Ord- er, Alleging That Govern- ment Is Not Interested. NEW YORK POLICE GIVEN ISTRICT ORDERS TO CURB RADICALS AT MEETING rations. Immediate objection came from the administration forces, Senator Underwood, Democrat, Alabama, cia- clarlng the proposals could not properly be considered until the resolution of'ratification came be- fore the Senate. He was assailing tho Republicans for delay and charsiniKihat their methods were designed to prevent a direct vote on the question of unreserved, ratifica- tion, when Senator Lodge asked: ChaUt'.ng-o "If the senator want's to hastan action, why doesn't he ask for a vote- right now on ratification with- out reservations "I'll do returned Senator Un- derwood, and he did. The move brought half a dozen Mayor Hylan Issues Definite In- structions to Pblice Commis- sioner Enright and Men. I the prospect of cosing light and wa-, i ten plants. A similar situation pre- I vailed in Nebraska where some schools were on the point cloning. of stale officials say that available iipurer- indicate lha.t the wets won In the defeat of the Crabb, artate prohibition enforcament act IF YOU FAIL TO RECEIVE Your. Standard Telegram, Erenlng Post or Sunday Post, or If you don't get your paper on tune, Telephone Bamum 6100, Circulation Department, POST PUBLISHING CO. NEW DRIVERS AT WORK ON MILK IN HARTFORD HARTFORD, Nov. a new force of delivery men at work today in place of tho 100 who had walked out, the Bryant Chapman company, milk dealers, resumed service with expectation ot a re- turn to normal within ten days. The emergency milk stations wore con- tinued in operation. will not recognize the union any said W. W. Bryant, "we cannot employ again the men who left us. Wa are glsA to find tho public is frith and {hat tho final result on tho ratification of Ohio's constitutional amendment will be close. They say tho othor two proposals, tho repeal of the state wide prohibition and the 2.76 beer proposals, wera de- feated by frhe "drj's." TONT aOMJOZ MISSING. Tony Gomez, a Portuguese, living at 77 Trumbul! road was reported to tho police yesterday as ha.vln.t; been missing from homo since Mon- day. According to tho police Oils 13 the sec'ona time that Oomez has wandered away. The man Is described as being aJbout. 45 year.'i old, has a musta.clie and is about all feftt tall and weighing- 200 pounds. however, taut refuse to give any in- senators to their feet and .In the ma- formation ns to who did the actual neuverins which the chamber presented a scene of con- tinuous confusion. Senator Hitch- cock lirst got the to preaoiit formally a unanimous consent agreement for a vote, and, although tha Republican managers inter- posed no objection, it failed to maet NEW YORK, Nov. Hylan tonight Instructed Police. Commissioner Bnrlght to "see to It that tha police tolerate .no dlsftrder of any kind" at a mass meeting V> be held at Ruggers square Saturday announced In a circular purported to have been Issued by the "com- munist party." "Stern and prompt measures" to prevent trouble are ordered. "The purpose of this gathering sot forth In the said ths mayor, "is to celebrate- -the second anniversary of the Bolshevik ro- volution, but it calls for a 'strike on November S.' "This mass meeting, as you no doubt appreciate, is called by the most brutal, tho most vicious and the most unpatriotic clement in our community. It represents horrloiu INDIANAPOliIS, Nov. mo- tion to dissolve tha order restrain- ing officials of the United Mine Workers of America from encourag- ing or directing the strike of tho members of the union was filed in' the .United States district court here this afternoon' by at- torneys for the miners. The restrain- ing order was issued last Friday and the hearing on a temporary 'in- junction, petitioned -by the govern- ment, will 'be next Saturday. The motion first sets out that the petition for the restraining order does not disclose that the govern- ment, tho plaintiff in the case, hag any interest. In the subject matter, or In the relief sought or in any injunctive relief. It Is set forth that the plaintiff is "without .equity and without clean hands." It la contended in the motion that the fuel administration was dissolv- ed by proclamation of the President and that the fuel administration cannot be restored legally -by the President. This is designed to meet tho contention of tha government that there was a conspiracy under the Lrfjver act to reduce the output communities suffvmg from a ooal shortage growing more numerous, the rallroud administration turned loose every available car to meet appeals made for fuel. Orders went to Regional directors of tho nation's railroads from Di- rector General Hlnes to eliminate train service where not absolutely necessary In the; public Interest, but it was officially announced thatjio general curtailment of service was contemplated. The discontlnuancs of foreign tonnage bunkering was first general step taken by the govern- ment since the coal strike began last Saturday toward curtailment of transportation. The central com- mittee made It plain that American- owned ships and tonnage .-under the American flag would continue to re- ceive coal supplies but all other vessels will be compelled to Jtwalt the end of the strike. Follows Britain's Action. The committee's action- la similar to that taken by Great Britain dur- ing tho recent strike of British coil miners. Officials would not predict re- salt of the order as it wei known in Washington the amount of foreign tonnage now in Ameri- can ports dependent on coal sup- plies from this It was apparent the central com- mittee considered prescedence must be given to all land traffic In the matter of fuel distribution beforo even American ships will be accord- ed bunkering permits. Policy Unchanged. t Before leaving Washington to- night for Indianapolis, Assistant At; torney General Ames, In of the killing. Binkowitz was employed as a bank messenger for the firm of Richard Whitney and company o' Wall street and on August 1 disap- peared with worth of I.lb- nrty bonds in his possession. A few -.vceks later his mutilated body was 'ound near a lumber pile on tho .Milford turnpike by an automobile urty passing that way. PROFITEER IN SUGAR HELD FOR U. S. COURT XBW HAVEN, Nov. Swlr- slrj'' a wholesale srocer here, ar- rested on a. charge of profiteering in sugar, Is hold under J2.000 to ap- pear on November 13 before Rich- ard Carroll, clerk of the United States district court. It Is alleged ha sola 200 pounds of suirar at 22 cents n. pound. tho approval .ol'-smne senators and a sharp After the vice-president had over ruled Senator Underwood's point of order, the at last wore formally laid before tho Senate. Start RcscrvutiOHS. The first paragraph of the reaer vfttion group, the only part coneld- ered today, recites that the reser- vations must be accepted by three of the four .other great, powers to make the treaty binding. As pre- sented, it had been slightly modi- fied from the original commlttet draft so that the acceptance would bo secured "by exchange of notes.'' (Continued on Pago Two.) of coal.' BRIDGEPORT TAXI MAN WANTED IN NEW HAVEN jfovernments cue, declared there no in toward strike tlutt troold endeavor to obtain a reneiwal at the temporary injunction. Reports from agents of On de- partment of justice from min- and operators showed little overnight change In Gomper's Appeal There rumors, emanating from high that the Injunction hearing for Sat- urday might go over for one without prejudice to either Equally persistent were reports that Samuel Gompers, president of the American Federation of Labor, _... would make a personal appeal to Subpoena Issued in Connection, with I Attorney Genearl Palmer tomorrow D'Affostino Kidnapping Case. j jor withdrawal of the restraining order and all court proceedings on that if 'this were' done issued by City Attorney for the strike'could be settled and the men put. back to work In 48 houra.1 all court proceedings. lino, in New York. Its disciples passion- NEW :Xov. sub- poena v today to y their lull scale committees, to nego- tiate a new wage agreement at one; sitting. Refusal, and Issuance of de-1 more drastic orders directing heads of the miners' organization to operations, would mean, these "Until such time as the can drive these fanatical sav- ages out of the country it Is our Juty to curb their .activities in this SEATS IN NEW YORK ASSEMBLY officials said, a Ions 1 struggle. drawn I OPPOSITION LEADER GETS HIS ELECTION VOCH ATTENDS ACATOBSrY. PARIS, 'Nov. Foeh, j who was elected a member of the I French Academy a year ago, attend- I od a session yesterday for the first i v i time since his first appearance. He i ST. JOHNS, N. P., Nov. came in quietly during a learned ard A. Squires, the .opposition leaa- disconrse. Later ho told his friends or, was successful at the polls In i that he was engaged now chiefly In j tha general election now in pro., "cleaning up" grass In Newfoundland, according to NEW YORK, Nov. i uiml returns today from St. Johns returns of the legislative contests CHILD'S BANK ROBBKD. '.West. Sir Michael Cashln, prime, compiled today show that the new isadore Bimbaum of 7S minister was previously announcod will be composed of liu street reported to the police last elected but returns today sholvrea. Republicans, 35 Democrats and live night that his horns was entered by heavy losses for the goiernmani. socialists. This is a gain of 16 vote sneak thieves and r. child's banu. Et. Henry tor the Republicans, a loss of 19 far cuntainlnpr about :UO stolen, to the opposition the Democrats and a pUtt Entrance wa.i oy using- u. Brownngg of 'hat and Col- tor the Socialists. onial Secr.rtan l.ennett. iNEWSPAPERl   

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