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Woodland Daily Democrat Newspaper Archive: February 20, 1930 - Page 1

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Publication: Woodland Daily Democrat

Location: Woodland, California

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   Woodland Daily Democrat (Newspaper) - February 20, 1930, Woodland, California                               Blankets Field No other newspaper covers this field, rich in hard-cash returns for ad. vertisers, as the "Democrat" does it. Today's Best Smile Mr. Justice Eve: "It is tlwtyt ter to be silent and be thought fool than to open your mouth and rvntovo all doubt about Toronto Daily Star. ISSUED, DAILY EXCEPT SUNDAY WOODLAND, CALIFORNIA. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1930. ESTABLISHED 1877 CHURCH LOSES IN LAND SUIT O4-0 04-O Rain Sufficient to Serve Needs of Farmers NO DAMAGE TO BLOOMS IN HEAVY DOWNPOUR The .44 inch of raifnall which fell here Wednesday night was adequate to care for all agricultural needs in Yolo county for the time being, it was said today. Rainfall was even heavier in the western part of the county than here, said reports. Grain was helped, and at the same time the rain, although at times nearing cloudburst propor- tions was not sufficient to damage blossoms on the fruit trees. The seasonal total now stands at 8.G6 inches, as compared to 8.22 last! year at this date. 1 Following are this season's rainfall j figures by days, giving the total; rainfall on the corresponding day' during the 1928-29 season: Daily Total Total' '29-'30 '28-'29 j Tipping Now Dying Art, Says Bellhop TRIAL IN The good old Spanish custom of tipping it is a Span- ish custom, but what's the differ- dying out, bemoans Dick Fletcher, bell boy extiaoidinary and pilot of Hotel Woodland's do luxe elevator. D'ck is really an extiaordinai'y bellhop, for he doesn't flip the window shades, rattle dresser drawers, sniffle and cough until tho guest tips him in a just hops bells and that's all. But there is coming a day, and it won-'t be very long, Dick feels, that there will be no more tip- ping. He has been in the racket five yeais and duiing that time there has been a giadual decline in the generosity of hotel guests throughout the alley. It is a well known fact among bell boys that the salary paid them is just enough to keep the wolf from the door. The tips are the cream, says Dick, but it won't CREEDS TO UNITE ATTACK DIIQQ DftI If V i3 stockt- the Qflinni QUIT lYUOu 1 vLlv 1 childien and son f OU11 Boys Scheme Elimination Of Punctures John Summers, 13, of Stockton, the oldest of nine children and son of! James J. Summers, accompanied by j his pal, Charles Rand, 14, a neighbor' I Conceding that the nine firms (By United Press) j boy and son of Harry LONDON, Feb. 20.-Lord Birkcn-1 detained at Vacaville last evening by ;furni5hed for the head bpened a strong attack in the Officer 0. E. Alley and taken to Fair-j h5h schoo, are entitled to their of Lords Thursday on the an-j field for investigation. bufc denying that the Globe ti-religious movement in Soviet Rus-j The lads> when taken into custody company bhould be responsible fo sia, attributing the "persecution" of by the officer, though mere claims> attorneys for the indem-j i had a veritable arsenal in the back Pro" j of their automobile, a large high- test against the anti-religious cam- i powered touring car the Summers paign in Russia, j boy stolen from the garage of his father about 9 o'clock Tuesday j churchmen to political motives, i demanded that the government movement was i mornmfr under way Thursday to call a general i _, i Thf> boys were honest in their con- denomma-' i fession and apparently did not at- meeting of all religious i tions in protect against alleged Sov- j iet Russian persecutions of Christians I and Jews. The, meeting would be held either, March 2 or March 9, ac- j cording to tentative plans. The movement is in conformity tempt to conceal anything. They told Undershcriff Perry when questioned at the jail that they had taken the j school nity company have filed a motion for' a new trial. Judge W A. Anderson recently j awarded to the Latourrettej Fical company and eight other plain-j tiffs-in their suit against the Globe company. I Contractor Surely 1 The indemnity concern went surety for D. R. Hanify, contractor for the! Oct. G. 0.00 Oct. Dec. 4 Dec. ...231 3.71 Dec. 10 .3.78 Deo. 4.30 Dec. 12 4.48 Dec. .43 4.82 Dec. 4.82 Dec. Dec. Dec. Dec. Dec. 39 0'3... Jan. 4 Jan. 6.12 Jan. 6 Jan. 6.12 Jan Jan. 10 Jan. .03 G 12 Jan. 12 Jan. 1 6.12 Jan. 5 07. 6.12 Jan. Jan. ...or, 6.49 Jan. IS Jan. Jan. Jan. Jan. 30 Feb. 44 (Continued on Page Four) car from Stockton, driven to Sacra- mento and then to Dixon, to see the T i v i Rand bov's mother, who works on the vith appeals broadcast last week by _ _ n TV in- 1.1. A 1.1-1. e r< Paul Peters ranch. Pope Pius XI, the Archbishop of Can- Not finding anyone at home they ACHAEANS. PLAN BASKET SUPPER tcrbury and Bi.shop Manning of New York, asking the clergy and congre- I gations of all denominations to join j in prayer for Russian Christians, who, they said have been relentless- ly persecuted by the Soviet govern- ment. "T" means trace. A "trace" amounts i to less than one hundredth of an inch and is not included in totals.' Daily reports aie for the 24 hours' ending at 9 a. m. j Rain measurements are taken each day at 9 a. m. by the Agricultural Extension service. The gauge is lo- j cated in the Court House grounds. The storm blanketed the state as i far south as Los Angeles. j reported a torrent that I brought .75 inch of rain in 20 min-, utes, flooding streets. Oroville had .77 inch in 24 hours, Red Bluff. 90' and Colusa 1.12. Clearing weather is predicted. Plans for the Achaean club's basket j supper to be held in Hotel Woodland next Wednesday night were completed' at Wednesday's regular meeting. Each; Achaean member is privileged tc i biing guests to the affair. After the! supper there will be dancing and a program. District Attorney Neal was the speaker at Wednesday's: meeting. He told the Achaeans, man.Vj of whom are newcomers to Wood- J land, of the changes in the city dur-j ing the last 25 years. He declared at' one time there was a horse-drawn street car plying from the station up Main street to Holy Rosary Academy, and it was one of the means of a Sun- clay afternoon outing in the days be- foie automobiles. Carl Williams was fellowship chair- man and introduced the speaker. Hairy Couch, who recently came to Woodland from Stockton, was a guest, t FLUKE POISONED IN FLUKE WAY Smoke and fumes from burn- ing poison oak rafted about the face and head of Henry Fluke of Knights Landing early this week and as the result he is in a ser- ious condition with poisoning from the schrub. Flu'ke was treated at the Wood- land Clinic late Wednesday. His face and head were exposed to the fumes and were affected the worst. Other parts of Fluke's body contracted the poison from this odd contact. helped themselves Savage a Winchester rifle, afshotgun and re-. volver together- with a large amount' of ammunition. They also loaded their car up with tools of all desorip-, tions. canned goods, meat and two five-gallon cans of gasoline and several gallons of kerosene and were j fully prepared for a lengthy sojourn in the mountains. The lads were without money and were on the best of terms with their fathers in Stockton, so they said, but were venturesome and were anxious for a lark. Thpy were held overnight in the woman's department at the county jail to await the arrival of their parents from Stockton. An ef- fort was made at the sheriff's office to have the lads cared for at the Napa Detention home, but that was impos- sible owing to the crowded condition, and an appeal to the county hospital met with unfavorable action. I- j When Hanify failed to pay his obli- gations to the firms wh'ch provided material for the school, the firms halted payment by Yolo county of a j balance due on the school 1 contract. 1 Meanwhile, Hanify signe.drover- hisj 1 interests in the proceeds of the con- j tract to the First National bank of Sonoia. The Globe company and the bank are contending for the residue in the treasury, the Globe concern j holding it is not liable for the obliga- tions to the material furnishers. To Be Delayed 'he new trial motion is scheduled to be heard in connection with the regular law and motion calendar Mon- day, but will probably not be heard until March 3. i There is only one other matter on the calendar for Monday. It is the final account and petition for distri- i bution in the trust of Hattie Cusack, deceased. Twenty thousand of those mis- erable punctures that happen just as the family gets started on the Sunday outing, or that cut short the shopping period by a half hour, or cause those long waits for the garageman on a blustry or scorching day are to be eliminated. For J. W. Howell. Y. M. C. A. secretary, has estimated that 80 of his "Y" boys can prevent at least that many punctures during their "Prevent Punctures" cam- paign that started Thursday and to run for five days. It-is purely a civic benefit en- terprise. The boys are to gather nails, tacks, pieces of glass and sharp instruments from high- ways, streets and alleys and bring them to the "Y" clubhouse each day for counting. At the conclusion of the drive, the high point boy in each club will be given a Y. M. C. A. knife prize. RULING OF LOCAL JURY SUPPORTED IN APPEAL Title to 80 acres of Yolo county land was, definitively won by Theodore Smith, and the that Smith j paid for the land was gained by Mrs. Viola Rablin in a decision of the state i Supreme Court, it was learned here today. as a Mrs. Blakeslee Left i Estate: STILL NO TRACE OF MISSING MAN The ruling of the highest state court upholds the verdict of a jury brought in in the Yolo superior court on December 22, 1926, in which Smith j and Mrs. Rablin were declared victors I in a suit brought against them by the I Seventh Day Adventist church. Suffered Delusions 1 That Mrs. Sarah Hayes, mother of I Mrs. Rablin, was the victim of delu- i sions when she deeded the property i over to the Northern California Con- i ferenee of the Adventist church was the decision of the jury, i An option on the land, given to I Smith by Mrs. Hayes before she deed- ed the property over cBurch held prior claim to the deed, it was decided. I After Mrs. Hayes' death, Smith proceeded to disregard the deed to the church and bought the property (By Valley News Alliance) from Mrs. Rablin. Mrs. Rablin Bosfield, Wat- claimed that the proceeds from the sonville trapper, who, at an altitude' pi operty should go to her, inasmuch of 4000 feet, started the first forest j as she was entitled to some recom- fire that the California National For-, pense for caring for her mother be- est has ever had in February, faced' fore her death, two charges when he went before, Appealed Case Justice of the Peace James Sharp at' Following the verdict of the jury in Elk Creek Tuesday, forestry officials' Judge W. A. Anderson's court more revealed late Wednesday. j than three years ago, the case was For setting the fire, which was! appealed directly to the Supreme near Alder Springs, he was fined Court, with no change in result, which was suspended. For possessing; Arthur C. Huston, Sr., was attor- venison out of season he was fined Iney for Mis. Rablin and Thomas TWO BLAZE COUNTS of which was remitted. Bos- i field protested he was hungry and I penniless. The fire, which Bosfield j started to clear away trees from a j road, burned 160 acres of timber and brush. Leeper Smith. of Sacramento represented State Wants Agreement With Bay Bridge Body Dr. Snook Loses Chance To Escape Execution ________ (By Valley News Alliance) A petition for probate of the will! RED trace had been i of Anna P. Blakeslee, who died in her i found Thursday of Joseph Durrer, home in Vallejo last October, was filed in the office of the Solano coun-1 ty clerk, Wednesday by F. A. Blakes-1 Rosewood district in 'wealthy retired Tehama county stock- man, missing from his home in the the mountains lee. The estate which does not exceed since Monday morning. j All hope of finding him alive in the i The SATURDAY TO BE GENERAL HOLIDAY (By United Press) j COLUMBUS, My- _______ 'eis Y. Cooper Thursday refused a re- (By Valley News Alliance) Iprieve to Dr. James Howard Snook.' consists of stocks and Vallejo mountains has been abandoned. the state former Ohio State University profes-; real estate. Those mentioned in the; only ray of hope held out by the I of California participates in the costjsor who is to be executed Februaiy will are F. A. Blakeslee, husband; j family is that aged man was picked 'of building highways to the ap-j28 for the murder of Ttieora Hix, his! Elizabeth Blakeslee Vierhus, former-, up by an autoist and taken out of preaches of the proposed Golden Gate j co-ed inamorata. j of Woodland, and Miriam Blakeslee j the countiy. bridge it must have the understanding Snook's counsel had asked a re-' Ferrell, daughters, and Walter Searchers With a few exceptions, business houses in Woodland will observe Sat-' mission. urday, Washington's birthday, as In the afternoon the commission holiday. Public offices will be clos-] listened to a delegation from Sonoma that when the bridge is paid for it will become a free bridge. This statement was made Thursday by Beit B. Meek, state director of Jed upon until two weeks from Fob- public works, to a committee repre- j ruary 24 when the court will formally senting the bridge district who con- receive the appeal, ferred with the state highway com-' and the trackers were still Rosewood district Lumber Yard Flames Do Damage KLAMATH spectacu- lar fire Wednesday night wiped out the Lamm Lumber company yard at Modoc Point, doing damage estimated I at Heavy winds made more dificult fighting of the flames and heavy rain that started falling an hour after the fire started aided the fire fighters. MAN BADLY HURT WHEN TREE FALLS prievc on the ground that the former; Blakeslee, a son, of Vallejo. Hearing working m professor's appeal to the United of the will will be held before Supe- j Thursday, but their work has been j States Supreme Court cannot be act-1 riot Judge W. T. O'Donnell, March 3. j made difficult by thcjram. 1 It Vt t 1 Two Working on Mrs. Cosgrove Claims Census in Yolo Earliest Sweet Peas When a tree fell upon him while working in the Sutter Basin Thurs- day afternoon, Louie Mazar, 60, re- ceived serious injuries. He was brought to the Woodland Clinic in a semi-conscious condition. Late in the afternoon physicians had not deter- mined the extent of his injuries. Marar was working with a crew cleaning up brush land and chopping trees. e Attempt to Kill COLUSA GRAIN MEN PLAN TOUR county headed by Assemblyman Frank to erect a l ed. There will be no rural or city mail delivery service and no window Luttrell who proposed Mail will be dispatched to j bridge I Russian river. I ______ Farm Bureau Active hi Shoals Bid, Head Says Woodland's first sweet peas of the -.1 (By Valley News Alliance) OROVILLE Augustine Mexican, was held in the county jail Thursday booked on an assault to kill charge pending the outcome of stabj (By Valley News Alliance) growers of Co- service. trains and distributed to boxes as usual and special delivery matter will be delivered. The "Democrat" will publish. j WASHINGTON The American across the mouth of j Farm Bureau federation's publicity i campaign endorsing the American Three Northern Men Now Fliers Junior High, Vallejo Project Two census enumerators arc now atj work in Yolo county, according to j season! Mrs. C. B. Cosgrove claims, be is alleged to have inflicted] lusa county will join in a tour Friday Edward Dinkelspiel, supervisor of this that she has them in the garden of j Qn patl.jco p0netti. The affray occur- j to inspect equipment and see the lat- diirtrict. They are Dorn Isaacs, who! her home, 449 Bartlett avenue. J red Wednesday night following a jest methods handling here, is in charge of Woodland and thej Mrs. Cosgrove is Hiram Henigan's, qualTeL Araya is the wounded man's'They will visit the north county territory, and Leonard. sister. Both are sweet pea enthu- j step.fathev. S. Royse of Davis, who has charge! siasts. They vie for supremacy in j__________'_ ______ _____ _MJ sister. Both are sweet Cyanimid company's bid for opera- j S. Royse of Davis, who has charge j tion of Muscle Shoals was financed of the work in the southern and east- j having the first and most excellent by the Cyanimid company, the Senate I evn section of Yolo. The men com- j' blossoms. Last year Hiram won, this River Garden Farms in Yolo county. (By Valley News Alliance) Building of a new junior high _______ school as a solution to the present! out the country under the name of MARYSVILLE Three fledgling overcrowded conditions in Vailejo the federation by the national agri- pilots of the Yuba-Sutter Flying club j schools is recommended by the board culture publishing company. were granted their "wings" in the! of education following a study of a form of private pilot licenses, after i survey, compiled by Andrew P. Hill, successfully passing an examination, chief of the division of schoolhouse conducted by Inspector William An-1 planning of the state board of educa- drews of the department of com- j tion. mercc, at Sacramento, Tuesday. I The new school, which it is planned The three new pilots arc: Roy to build on a ten-acre tract in the Westfall, Orovillc; William S. Kent eastern section of the city, will cost approximately and will be modern in every detail. lobby committee was told Thursday.; menccd their work February 11 and J year Mrs. Cosgrove is ahead. Chester Gray, representative of the' arc expected to complete the enumera-j gan's flowers will be blooming federation, said the company paid for tion by Maich 15. few days, publicity circulated to papers through-1 in a; Press Time Bulletins and Herbert Marysvillc, F, Keeler, both of Find Body of Eielson Beside Wrecked Plane (By United Press) NOME, body of Carl Ben Eielson, aviator who was lost November 9, 1929, has been found nonr the wreck of his plane. I NEW WILLIAMS MUSIC TEACHER SELECTED COLUSA, Feb. D. Pardee of Seattle has been chosen CoolIflPCS to Week-End i as music director for the Williams and Maxwell high schools, sue- _.. _ i iir-ii' IIF i ceeding Wolfram Schmedding, who suffered a nervous breakdown VlCtimS Improving i With William Wrigley and was committed to the state hospital at Stockton. Schmeddirig Undulant Fever Leigh W. Feldmiller, University Farm employe, who has been in the observation was arrested in Woodland. under j for undulant fever, has returned to i his home and is on his way to recov- ery. Orval Borland, also a fever vic- tim from Davis college, is still in the clinic but is making satisfactory pro- gress. (By United Press) and Mrs. i Coolidge left the California mainland Thursday for a Catalina Islands LUMBERMAN KILLED UNDER FREIGHT TRAIN LOYALTON, Feb. attention given to a newspaper week-end visit where they will the guests of William Wrigky, The bont which carried them on Jr. the 25-mile journey to Avalon left here in a drizzling rain at 10 a. m. to i Frank E. Walker, assistant secretary and manager of the Clover be Valley Lumber company, was instantly killed Thursday when stepped in front of a Western Pacific train. Snow..was IftJUng when Walker stepped out of the station and crossed the engine and five freight cars passed over his body when he brushed under the wheels.   

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