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Woodland Daily Democrat Newspaper Archive: December 27, 1898 - Page 1

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Publication: Woodland Daily Democrat

Location: Woodland, California

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   Woodland Daily Democrat (Newspaper) - December 27, 1898, Woodland, California                               VOL. XXXIX. WOODLAND, CALIFORNIA. TUESDAY EVENING-, DJfiUEMBtilt Ja7, 1898. KG. ISO NARROW ESCAPE, CONDITION 1500D, Passenger and Freight Trains Col- lide at Webster, Conductor Irwin Injured, and Several Woodland Passengers Severely Shaken Up. Monday morning about 7 o'clock there waa a slight wreck at Webster siding, about eight miles from this city, and between it and Davisville. The Oroville local had stopped on the main track to let freight train No. 6 paes. The engineer of No. 6 belonged to another division, and was unfamiliar with the landmarks along the toad. There was a very heavy fog, and in BO me way be missed seeing the whist ling-post, and ran by the switch befoie he knew where he was. The rails being slippery, although 'he had slowed down considerably, he was unable to stop, and the two engines c.ime together, breaking the pilots and knocking the rear truck from under the tender of the passenger engine. The mail car waa also slightly damaged. Conductor Nat Irwin, of the Oroville tiam, was juat coming out of the door of a car when the accident occurred, and the door was slammed to, catching his foot. Conductor Sattell, of No. 6, jumped and sprained his ankle. No one else was hurt. A switch engine was sent out and brought in the truck of the tender and the Oroville train. As the switch was not obstructed by the wreck, trains were able to paaa without "delay.-Record Union. Among the passengers were A. C. Huston, Fred Koenig, Ed. Altpeter, GeorgeJVIerritt, Mrs. Jeanette Merritt, R. W. Browning and Mrs. Elmira Clark, of this city, and E. J. Tharpe and wife, of Knights Landing. Their experience was decidedly unpleasant and they will not aoon forget the severe shaking up they received. BLACK WILL CONTEST. Judge Buckles' Decision in Regard to Cost of Contestants. Judge Buckles has rendered another decision in regard to the cost of con- testants in the Black-Moore will con- test. The com t finds as follows: That the contests of R. E. Moore, Maitha Washington and Susan B. Wolfskill were tried as one contest; that the contest of .fames R. Black was another contest; that the two said contests were tried in one action, or as one trial; that It. E, Moore, Martha Washington and Susan B. Wolfskill paid out of their wn money the sum of aa jury fees and said James R. Black paid nothing for said services; that the court having heretofore made an order that contest- ants should pay the whole of said jury services it is just and proper that Jarnea R. Black should bear aii equal pro- portion of said jury fees. Testimony being heard, the court now finds that said James R. Black should pay to said contestants the sum of and that they have judgment therefor and execu- tion on said A Hotstuff Game. Anyone who waa fortunate enough to be the vicinity of the old college campus thia morning enjoyed a feame of baseball which completely outclassed that afforded the patrols the game on Monday. Ernie Freeman and his brave little lads smothered Chic" Voorhiea" team after the score was 20 to 3 in favor of the latter team, and that, too, in the ninth inning. The fea- tures of the game were the pitching of Jimmie Richardson and the umpir- ing of Hot Stuff" Borden. The bat- teries were J. Richardson and Eddie Webb for Freeman's side and Karl Voorhies and Buck flogoboom for Chic's side. Successful Operation for Appen- dicitis on Lan Merrill His Friends Are All Very Hopeful That His Recovery Will be Speedy and Complete. An operation for appendicitis was performed on Lan Merrittat the Sisters' Hospital, in Sacramento, Monday tnorn- i.ig, December 26th, at 11 o'clock. Dr. Huntington operated, ai.d he was aa- sitted by Dra. Simmons and Parkinson, of Sacramento, and Dr. Lawhead, of this city. There was no pus, but the adhesions were stronger than nrticinsied, and the operation was therefore very severe, lasting one hour and five minutes. Mr. Merritt bore the ordeal splendidly and passed from under the influence of the ether without feeling any bad ef- fects. He rested fairly well Monday night. t Dr. Lawhead left Sacramento at 6 o'clock this morning. At that hour the temperature of the patient was 99 pulse 104 and the general condition favorable. Mr. Merritt 19 a yonngt man of tem- perate habits, splendid physique and robust constitution and his friends are therefore very hopeful of his speedy and complete recovery. LOCAL BREVITIES. Licensed to Wed. if Late this afternoon Clerk Duncan issued three marriage licenstp, 'as follows: Pruce B. Frazee, age of Woodland, and Jennie L.I ajre 19, resident, of Rimer L, Meenen, age 20, resident of and Daisy Adama, age 19, of Woodland; Charles Edgar French, age 33, of Willows, and Agnes Kergel, age 22, of Yolo. Railroad men report that travel was very light on Christmas day. The sun is traveling northward again and the days are growing longer. The signal service predicts partly cloudy weather tonight and Wednesday. George Geary arrived from Modoc county Saturday night with two car- loads ot very fine cattle. The announcement that the ball game for Chnatmaa had fallen through was a great disappointment to the cranks. Rev. Joel Martin preached to a good audience in the CongregationaldChurch last night and will preach again tonight. Go and bear him. The two-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs B. F. Stephens, who has been very ill iMi malarial fever for some time, is now convalescent, Attorney J. T. Carey, of Sacramento, was in thia city today transacting some business at the courthouse in connec- tion with the of hia deceased father. The social to be given by the Yolo choir Wednesday, December 28th, will be held in Mrs. Griffith's store building; instead of at Mrs. L. Cramer's home, as beretofcre announced. Postmaster Holmes waa taken suddenly ill Sunday morning while putting up the mor'ning mail, and it was necesaary to summon a physician. He is able to attend to his duties today. The latest repnrta from Oliver Fuller, who waa injured recently in an accident in the railroad shops, are to the effect ;hat he will probably lose hia foot. Another operation upon the injured member will be performed todav. No person in Yolo county valuea his present more than does W. B. Gibson. was a genuine Missouri possurrwand came all the way. from hia native heath by express. His poasumship would ;race a pan of baked sweet potatoes. One of the social events announced or the holid ly season is a whist party at the residence of Mrs. George J. O'Connor next Saturday afternoon, at which Mra. O'Connor and Miss will entertain a number of their friends. B. Miller will dispose of an odd ot of hohilav goods at 50 cents on the A few of the itema are hand- {erehief, and necktie caeea, saekets, gerita' embroidered suspenders and tiea, mufllera, etc. See hia ad. in another column. Dn'k Wallace, manager of the Wood- land baseball team, returned thia after- noon from Red KhifT, where he sncnt Christmas. Ue reports having had a deiiglitful time, but he waa shocked to that hia aggregation of ball- pUyera had been RO defeated. FAST FOOTBALL, Seriously 111. P. F. Heater, an old reoidnntof Wood- litnd, ic lying critically ill nt his home on Fifth street, between Cross and Pen- degaat, and but slight, are enter- tained for his recovery. MJ. Hester wni taken ill about four days ago and affliction culminated in typhoid pneumonia of a serious type. Honors Even Between Woodland and Harysville, Three of the Players Were Severely Injured in Some of the Many Very Lively Scrimmages. MAKYSVII.LE, December game of football played here yesterday between the Senior team of "Woodland and the Marysville Athletic Club's eleven resulted in a tie, the score being 6 to G. T.'ie visitors made their points in first half. The second half was hotly contested. Ray Wright, left end for Woodland, was hurt ou the stomach and head, requiring the services of a physician. Hudson, for Marysville, suffered a acalp wound, and Learmout, of the same team, had to retire on account of injuries to his back. The game was witnessed by 1000 people, quite a number having come from Woodland. The two teams lined up as follows: WOODLAND. MfAKYSVItLE Hillhouse..............C.............Gillman Bush ...........f. G.......Berg, captain Holloway...............K. G...............Kimel Clark T............Bennett Barling R. T ..........Basaett Malcolm................R. E........Hudson Wright..............L. B...... O Bneri Crane.................Q.................. streif Marston, captain .L. H............Berg Browning.........K. H ...............Boyd Thomas.................F. B..............Noack The vVoodland team, with two excep- tions, was the same as lined up against the High School when the score was 37 to 0 in favor of Woodland. Marysyille, with the single exception of Berg, played all new and heavier men. Tne Maryeviile team had the advan- tage in weight, but the Woodlands showed the moat skill and the best tactics. Near the end of the first half Wood- land was slowly but aurely approaching the Marysville goal line for another touchdown. With only five yards more to gain Wright made an offside play and Woodland was penalized fifteen yards. Time waa too short for the Woodland boys to regain the distance thua As described by the spectators, in the play in which ilarysville was credited with a touchdown, the ba.ll was dead and the play counted for neither side. It should have been brought back on Woodland territory and given to Marys- ville. Captain Marston, as usual, covered himself with glory. He made a forty- yard tun and also made the touch- down. Harling am! Clark, for the home team, made the best defensive olay. Biowning also played a tine fact, all the boys did well. Boyd was the star performer for the Marysville team and he waa ably sup- ported by O'Brien and Hudson. The Woodland boya speak in high praise of the hospitable manner in which they were treated. They were the guests of the Maryaville team at the Turn Verein hall in the evening. AUBREY HOWARD, Court Martial Exonerates Him From Charge of Desertion, He Has Been Temporarily Assigned to Battery I, Heavy Artilleiy, at Fort Point. All our readers are familiar with the story of Aubrey B. Howard's enlistment in the heavy artillery, of the assignment of his battery to service iu Alaska, of his severe sickness on the voyage and the abandonment of all hope lor his recovery by his physicians, anil his subsequent return. As soon as he became convalescent application waa made for his transfer, and, under the impression that it had been granted, he boarded the first steamer leaving yt. Michael for Sun Francisco, without making any report to the commanding officer. Aa soon as his absence was reported his captain reported him ab a deserter. He arrived at home in due time and ae soon as be heard of the charge against him he surrendered to Marshal Lawsoti, who conveyed him to Ban Francisco and turned him over to the military authorities. Fie wae trii'd by court martial in the latter part of November, Captain Barnes acting as judge advocate and A. C. Huston, of this city, appearing for the defense. Mr. Huston did not attempt any technical defense. He advised his i client to tell a plain straight- forward story, which he did, relying upon the good character of young Howard and a sense of lair play upon the part of the court to exonerate hie client from any intentional wrong-doing. The result shows the wisdom of his course. The court martial has jual lendered a decision exonerating young Howard from the charge of desertion. He iiaa been assigned temporarily to Battery I at Fort Point. Attorney Huston's management of the case was admirable and was very favorably commented upon by Captain Barnes and the Officers of the court martial. Subject to the War Tax. The draymen and expreaamen are busilv engaged IK having their patrons xecnte new bonds for the coming vear to the ra'lroad company for their deliv- ery of freight without the of a shipping receipt. In former years theie was no expense attached to this procedure, but now a war tax stamp must be affixed to ea( h bond. Quiet for the Police. The police for'-e win not overworked luring the Christmas hohdayn, as there was not -i single arrest made during the two days. There were no drunks, and the hobos evidently ate their turkey elsewhere. A little difficulty took place Saturday evening, hut it was of a tri- fling nature, one of the participants re- ceiving a black eye. 20 Per Cent Discount. Cieo. ,1. O'Connor give 20 per corit discount for cash horn now until De- cember Slat, on roilet, cases, artistic panels, tnirrorp, calendars, etc. Mr. O'Connor's good-t are ail new and up to date and are just the t hints for New Yerr nnd birthday presents. Rend Ins new ad. A (ire display of waicheo, iKunondB, solid silver and "liver-plated also silver novelties and Rogers Bros.' tableware, at {-pi-cml prices for Christmas onlv, at Kd tho lead- ing jewelry d5tf Halt water fieli at FARMERS' INSTITUTE. There Should be a Good Attendance Next Week. Some weeks ago several persons met at the city hall to devise waj t) and means to hold a farmers' institute. Professors Fowler and Wood worth have been by the State University authorized to hold the same on Januarv 5th a.nd 6th aM on the evening of t'le 6th. lion. G. W. Pierco, W. B. Gibson, Chailes Hoppin, M. Miss Carrie Blowers, T. S. Spauhung, G. H. Hecke, C. W. Thomas and Henry Howard were selected as a committee to arrange foi the institute. This committee hap secured the opera house for the 6th and Gth and also for the evening of the 6th. A program its now in course of preparation. It la hoped that there will be a good attendance. The principa.1 work will foe done by the State University professors. The questions to be con- sidered are practical and scientific- farming and fruit growing; the market- ing of fi nit and farming products; why should have a home raarkut and why we should trade at home; irrig.i- tion and its value; pumping aa a means of irrigation stock and poultry- raising, etc. The work of the professors will he interspersed with papeis by local men and women. Enjoying Their Vacation. There was no regular calendar hoard by Judge Gaddis in the Superior Court today, as all business had been con- tinued over until January 3d in order to the court and tho members of Hui bar to enjoy a holiday vacation. Judge Gaddis made a couple of orders today, however, in regard to ilo- rniirrers which ho had under consider at ion :ti caac-H of Hank of Yolo vs. G. F. Henmgan and C. F. Silvia va. A. D. Miller. In both cases tho dernurrerH were overruled ami the defendants were allowed ten days in which to answer the complaints of plaintiffs. Buggy robes an'! horne choice selection at R. ston's. blanket0 a H. Cran- d3tf Kaalorn oysters at cI24tf HUNGRY HOLLOW, The Farmers Anxiously Awaiting lor More Rain, Christmas Tree and Very Interesting Literary and Musical Program in Center District. HUN GUY HOLLOW, December Merry uhristoias! The people of Hungry Hollow at tended the Christmas exercises given at Center district schoolhouse. The tree, also the house, was beautifully decor- ated. The following program was ren- dered Address.......................Merman Roth lustrumputul solo Christmas Bell V. ilulnes Kide" ...........Mulle. Recitation Railroad filbert 1'u.rkt-r Music...................Hungry Hollow Baud He Doeth His Alms to be Seen "......................Katie Herman Vocal Peace on the Other Side .............Mihseg Mane and Martha Mast Christmas Durst Violin solo....................Chester Goodiiow The Factory Child's Last ".......................Etta Herman Gehe Las Dem Hem by Claus' ..................................Karl Schreller in Fairyland ................................Elgie Blickle Vocal Yet" Mrs. NIckell and Baifcy Goodnow Conquest "...Ktgina eiss Goodnow Violin Uantitie W aves ............................Chester Goodnow Christmas in Alaska Frieda Blickle O Wonnerville Seltge Zert Johnnie's Opinion of Grand- mother ".......................Albert barker A selection by the band" concluded the program, after which the presents were distributed. Y. E. Rothe is spending bis Christ- mas vacation at home. Lena Durst is able to be out again. Ben Brown is the happy father of a girl baby. Hoy A. Mast is on the sick list. Mr. and Mrs. N. K. Nickell are visit ing friends here. Henry Rothe, who yisited in Sacra- mento, returned home last Friday. Misses Sophie and Vena Haloes, ol Woodland, are visiting friends in thifc vicinity. Monroe Foster went to Woodland to spend his Christmas holidays. The people of this vicinity are anx- iously awaiting rain to bring the sown grain up, also so they can commence plowing. The last rain was hardly enough to begin plowing, although n few have started to do so. ALPHA. A Birthday Party. A very pleasant party was giveu o' the home of Mr. and Mrs. Qua Uahler on Court street Sunday evening, the occasion being the celebration of the thirty-ninth birthday anniversary o Mr. Dahler. A largo number of friendi took part in the feptivitiea, which con- sisted of card playing and other amuse ments. Dainty refresh men 1s wen- served during the evening and it waa a late hour before the guests depaiied for their homep, after felicitating Mr. Dahler upon the hapny event and ex- pressing the hope that he may live to enjoy manv mere such. Family Christmas Tree. Tiie fatherland style of holding u family Christmas tree waa observed on Sunday by II. Hachmann and family. The tree was beautifully decorated am) memuera of the family ap propriate keepsakee. Many frien-lF called during the day and were hoapi- tablj entertained by Mr. and Mrs. tJachmann aud their daughters. An Error. several of the newspapers that are oppoairifj the senatoiial aspirations of Col. iJan Burns are making the mistake of charging that he waa at one time an inmate of tins Yolo county jtiil. 1 here is not one word ol truth in thin atorv. Fine white blankets at 85, and something of u beautiful finish and oxtra large at Rosenberg Brob. Silver atid gold monctcd umbrella? gold and silver mounted pursea at ppe cial prices for Christmas only, at Kt! aet'p, tho jeweler. d6tf Misa Kate Zimmerman will eel' all trimmed and untrimmed hats 20 per cent off for cash for the next weeks. ja A few more choice silk waist patterns and dreaa good'! patterns at Rosenberg Bros. dlOtf THAT CIRCULAR, An Anonymous Libeler Tries to Escape Responsibility, Those Who Know A. L. Henry Will Ifot Believe William J. Hug- ted's Absurd Story. During the campaign an anonymoni circular reflecting upon the character of the female employes of the State ing office was sent out, with the evident intention of injuriously sftecting the campaign of Mr. for State printer. Mr. Woodman and hit friends promptly disavowed all respon- sibility for the circular. Since the election a detective has been ferreting out the guilty party with the result that a man named William J. H us ted, an employe in the railroud shops, haa confessed that he wrote the scurrilous circular, the evident hope of mitigating his henious offense he hag attempted toshilt n part of the re- sponsibility upon the shoulders of A. L. Henry secretary of the highway! mission, whom he chajges with having revised the manuscript. Mr. Henry declares with much em- phasis and evident sincerity that he had nothing whatever to do with the preparation and dissemination of thi circular and knew absolutely nothing of its contents until hie attention was called to the matter. In thii he corroborated by D. G. McCallum, oten- ographer in the bureau of highways, who nays the circular was typewritten by him en the order of Hosted, and delivered to the residence of the latter, and tiiat to the best of his knowledge neither Mr. Ilenry _iur anyone else connected with the department knew anything abont the contents of the manuscript. Those who know Mr. Henry and Mr. McCallum believe that their statement is perfectly frank and Vlr. Henry is a journalist of ble reputation and splendid ability and is incapable of any act that will not bear the closest scrutiny. Mr. McCal- lutn'a integrity and veracity have never been questioned. A scoundrel who will wantonly and anonymously assail the reputation of a defenseless wtinan it in- capable of injuring the reputation of men like Henry and McCallum. A BIG COMMISSION. A Yolo County Attorney Might Have Earned the Fee. The legal firm of Douglas Pybnrn has presented a claim against Yolo county for being 25 per cent commission for the collection of .49 for Yolo county from the State for the care of aged County Treasurer Wood has already received the aum of on account of the above collection and Controller Colgan baa In- structed him to withhold the remainder of the amount from the money due the State from Yolo county at the next set- tlement. The above claim is presented in accordance with the contract entered into by the board of supervisors and the attorneys. Making Headway. Reports from Jersey Island state that Sarn Montgomery, who had the New- town jetty Imieh contract, is making rapid progress on the work of doling the immense break down there. He liits used 3000 feet of wi re cable ta anchor the levees, torether with 700 tons of roi-k and 840 cords of baled brush, and asserts that wben he gets the job fin- ished it will remain where he puts it. Such being the case, he will make small fortune out of it Vista News. Now is trie ume to have your last 311 in mot suit fixed up like new. Geo. Kckhardt, the tailor. Cleaning and repairing a specialty. Satisfaction cnarantenl. Armstrong A Alge block. Beet assortment of cameras and photo supplies in town at Leithold's. dlOtf Go to flachmann, the tailor, for stylish fit 11 suit Rt reasonable Colored shirts of all kinds Oysters in cans, oysters in balk oysters in shell at Moff9ronyer's.d24tf. Wood, coal, hay, straw and all of feed at Boy leu' wood and feed yard. d3tf Go C Walter H LXJkK. ollf SPAPFRI   

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