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Woodland Daily Democrat Newspaper Archive: September 14, 1898 - Page 1

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Publication: Woodland Daily Democrat

Location: Woodland, California

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   Woodland Daily Democrat (Newspaper) - September 14, 1898, Woodland, California                               XXXIX. WOODLANO, CALIFORNIA. WEDNESDAY' 4 ffiP r E MB ti U 14, 1898. NO. 63 IIEF' CITY NEWS tents of Interest in Woodland and Surroundings, sal Items of More or Less Interest Picked up Here and There On the Wing. iocial life is unusually dull at present, indication' of a shower have ipeared, (The county roads are rather too dusty r comfort. The last crop of alfnlfa is light, but of quality. All the public schools in the county e now open. See fifty-cent column ad. of tamales >r sale by L.. Lucello. Cool nights and warm days are tl.e laturea of thf> weather. Democratic eonfi ienee in victory next ovember is very marked. There will be a meeting: of the county oard of education next Saturday. The date for opening the campaign ID olo county has not yet been fixed. The Democratic countv central com- littee ia well pleased with the outlook. The new military com pan v will meet the new armory this evening for a nil. There wats a meeting of Woodland arlor, No. 90, N. D. G. W., Tuesday vening. After a brief vacation the lawn tennis nthubiasts are visiting the eour's eguleru. Gariield Howard, son of Mr. and flrs. H C. Howard, is seriously ill with yphoid fever. Two hundred head of sheep have atraved to the Fair ranch. See fifty- ent column ad. Sheriff Smith, of county, wae enominated on Tuesday. He is re- tarded as invincible. The work of layinu in a winter's sup- aly of wood now engrosses the attention jf manv Woodland pe >ple. is payday at the creamery ind Hill be distributed among the stockholders and patrons. What ia Known as the barn dance is ,1-ie latest eociel fad of the East, which a making its way to California. While the campaign is not yet >n, candidates are_ not losing any oppor- utntiea to mix with the dear people. Dr. Jackson presided over the Demo- sratic county convention of Sutter sounty, which was held on Tuesday. The hook and ladder company will iold a special meeting this evening, at vhich time severa! new members will ie elected The Barr-Baird and the Wallace- Barker camping parties are expected lome from the mountains the first part >f next week. Silver Republicans are anxious to get he party designation on the official and for that purpose are circu- ating petitions. Mrs. J. H. Harlan and son, Claude, uive returned from Glenbrook, Lake Claude has almost recovered rnm his recent illness. Hi Simpson, the jovial clerk in store, is taking a lay-off of everal weeks and expects to visit Sac- amento and San Francisco. Many Woodland merchant-- still tjet heir heavy groceries by way of the iver from San Francisco to Sacramento, hence by team to Woodland. Democrat? of Yuba and Sut'or county re mentioning Harry J. Stabler, of Tuba City, and Hon. D. A. Ostrom, of Vheatlind, for joint senator. Concord a Lodge, No. 20, Sons of Her- riann, will hold a meeting Uns evening a transact some importantbusinesa. AH lembers are requeated to attend. Yolo county people ought to feel an iterest in the canva1-? of Dr. Raker for upervi'or in Solano county. He lives lighty cloee to the line and ia a safe, inaervative man. Constable Irvin found a. drunken man fing on a Main street sidewalk ay evening and locked him up. Fie released HnS mornine upon a prim- ie to leave the  r the grand ball to be given at Esparto on Friday evening, September 23d, un- der the auspices of the Esparto club. The Nevada volunteers will not be mustered out until lurther orders. Four companies of the Eighth Regi- ment will leave for Vancouver Barracks today. The tram will go by way of .Sacramento. C. E. McQiuid. a brother to J. W. McQuaid, of the DEMOCRAT office, hat been nominated for assessor by the Democrats of Sutter county. M. A. Nurse came in from Klkhorn this morning and went out to Esparto this afternoon. He says the work on the easement is progressing rapidly. Professor Martin Kellogg baa resigned the presidency of the State University, and Miss Jennie Flood has made a gift to the regents which ia valued at The piles of one jetty at Newtown shoals have been driven and is now ready for the brush mattresses. Con- tractor Montgomery will begin to move the fascines soon. >l Peter Krellenberg reports that H. A. Clausen, the prominent Blacks farmer, who was seriously injured a few weeks ago by falling from a step-ladder, is im- proving nicely and is now able to his bed. An old case entitled Kohler Chase vs. A. J. Carrilo was argued in Judge Latnpton's court today and submitted. The plaintiffs renewed the right to file the proper proof that they are a legally organized corporation. Ed P. Huston's horse took a spin along Fourth street this afternoon, but was stopped before any damage re- sulted to either the animal or rig. The horse was left standing unhitched and concluded to take a spin. Mrs. Eliza D. Grimes has received a check for from the Ancient Order of United Workmen in payment of n oolicy held by her deceased husband, George C. Grimes, who was a member of Yosemite Lodge, of Fresno. George Tobias has returned from the Sacramento river, where be has been working for several weeks, and will now commence to make an active canvass for constable of Woodland township. He will be an independent candidate. The Native Sons will hold a regular meeting in Masonic Hall this evening. District Deputy Grand President Gose, of Esparto, will be present for the pur- pose of exemplifying the rituals. All the members are requested to be pres- ent. Not less than twenty people sent in answers today to the Exam'ner picture jpuzzles. and, so far as we can learn, ail the inswers are about alike. There are seventeen prizes and Woodland is making calculations on getting the bulk of them. Michael Walsh has petitioned the Superior Court of Sacramento county tor probate of the wH of Cecelia Bald- win, deceased. The property consists of real estate in Knights Landing valued at and personal property valued at Fred Bullock had another uncomfort- able experience on Tuesday. He went over to Knights Landing on his wheel and on his return trip his wheel was disabled. The young man had to walk back to Knights Landing and return to Wo idland on the train. Word was received in this city today from Leandro announcing tho death of Frank Pratt, after a lingering illness from consumption. Deceased was a brother-in-law of Gus Ludden and was well known in Woodland, having visited here quite frequently. Mr. Ludden went to San Leandro this afternoon. The ladies in the vicinity of the old Presbyterian Church near Yolo will give a lawn social at the residence of William Hatcher Thursday evening. Those who do not wish to attend at night will be welcome at any time after 3 o'clock in the afternoon. Refresh- ments will be served for the benefit of the M. E. Church, South, of Yolo. PURELY PERSONAL PvOBBEJ) THEIE COMPANION. Movements of Persons Prominent in Society and Business, Social GoMip of Interest About People Who Dwell in Woodland and Suburban Districts, Independent Ticket- The people of Northern Solano are talking about the advisability of putting up an indepen lent and county ticket. Thev don't to elect it but. they want, to express their dissatisfaction with the contempti- ble treatment which both parties re- ceived at the hands of Vallejo. It is aHo snid that they would cut loose from Solano county nnd become annexed to Yolo if there was anv possible way to bring about such a I. W Johnson went to San Francisco this morning. John Langenour returned to College City this morning. Maggie O'Keefe want to Sacra- mento this morning. Rev. H. M. McKnight returned to Oakland this morning. Herb Coil and wife went over to ramento this morning. Father Hynes went over to Sacra- mento thia afternoon. Misses Olda and Hevel went over to Sacramento this morning. Fred and B. returned from Placerville this morning. J. 8. White took her departure for San Francisco this morning. Asa L. Morris and T. M. Prior went over to Sacramento this morning. John Scheurly and Frank Dietz went over to Sacramento thia afternoon. C. A. Brown and family returned from Sacramento Tuesday evening. Miss Tillie Schluer returned from a visit to Sacramento Tuesday evening. E. F. Haswell and wife, of Rumsey, went over to Sacramento this afternoon. Schluer and daughter, Miss Annie, went to Sacramento this morn- ing. A. M. Britt and family returned from a visit, to San Francisco Tuesday even- ing. Mr. and Mrs. Leavy, of San Fran- i isco, are visiting G. W. Hiatt and family. Tandy Allen and Miss Minerva Dunpby went over to Sacramente this morning. "Uncie Billy" Hatcher, the dominant aenius of "Missouri is in Woodland today. D. M. Jones and family returned from Sacramento Tuesday evening, where they attended the fair. C. W. Bush and daughter, Floi- ence, end son, Cay, departed for Balti- more, Md., this afternoon. Mrs. Holcom and family, of Oakland, former residents of Woodland, are registered at the Julian. E. L. Meenan, of Hlacka, Wm. Mont- gomery and George Gallup, of Dunni- uan, are registered at the Julian. Fred Schirmer and wife, Miss May Schirmer and Isaac Putman of Dixon, passed today on their way to Butte county on a camping trip, Bert Bass, son of Mrs. J. L. Base, of Baird, was here Monday night on hia way home after an extended absence at Dunnigan, Yolo Free Press. Drunken JOB Take Blankets, Money and Clothing. About 8 o'clock this morning Consta- ble Lee run across five hobos near the depot, and us they filling up on wine he told them to leave. One of the crowd had a roll of blankets, tOim money and a quantity of clothing, lie did not aopear to be a full-fledged hobo, but did most of the talk'ng back ordered by the officer to move on. The crowd e'ld not leave at ome, but roamed around the city and the conse- quence was that the man with the blankets and money was fleeceu by hit companions and left lying drunk on Fourth street. About 3 o'clock this afternoon he awoke and upon realizing his condition hunted up Mr. Lee and related his ex- perience, Tbe man had just enough clothes left to avoid arrest for indecent exp The officer told him to tuove on and he started out Viain Street to the west. When he reached the brewery he met his companions, who had committed the robbery, and at once inaugurated a row. As a result he was pummelled over the head until his injuries were serious and painful. Constable Lee was notified of the af- fair and arrested the crowd, including the man who was beaten, and locked them up in jail. AROUND THE DEPOT. An Electric Bell for the Main Street Crossing. The freight receipts today were one carload of ice for the Union Ice Com- pany and one carload of merchandise. Sam Brown shipped one carload of sheep and one carload of cattle to VaJ- lejo this afternoon. M. Murphy, roadmaster of the South- ern Pacific Company, baa notified agent Barber that an electric bell will soon be placed at the Main street railroad croos- itiE. The bell will be mounted on a pole, and by means of a wire, any train approaching from the north will set it to ringing to warn coming teams ami give them am- ple time to get out of the way. The bell will not be rung for north-bound trains, as all those stop at the depot and can be seen by persons approaching the crossing. ANOTHERI.ECTURE. A Rumor. A rumor has been in circulation for a couple of daya to the effect that District Attorney Hopkins, who is now at Santa threatened with a stroke of paralysis, but the story cannot be traced to any reliable source. Several lotters were recently received in this city from Mr. Hopkins in which he stated that he 13 getting along nicely and 19 much im- proved in health. Rev. Lowell Will Appear in the Chris- tian Saturday Evening. The large audience that beard Rev. Lowell Tuesday evening, was delighted with him, and by special request the reverend gentleman will appear in the Christian Church on Saturday evening, at 8 o'clock. Rev. Lowell will appear ic his latest production, The Man Whc which is intensely dramatic and humorous, introducing great variety of thought and expression and several of hia latest songs. Rt-v. Lowell ia a brilliant thinker, a sublime orator and a sweet singer. He has appeared ID many of the principal cities of California, and everywhere has pleased his audiences. He has very fluttering endorsements from some of the most renowned men of letters of the United States. Admission will be by ticket, which can be procured free of charge lit both music stores. A collection will be taken at the door. F. D. Roliaon, the North American Brissor-fcbarpcner, has returned to Woodland and is prepared to n Knives, razors, Pciasora, lawn mowert, Hea (quarters at Chan. Turner's cyclery. Blti A Yolo Petty Larcenist. Charles Miller, the man arrestrd bv Officer Naghe! on Monday last for steal- ing a roll of blanket? belonging to William in Washington, Yolo county, was tried before Justice Gill vesterdav, found guilty and sentenced to serve thirty dnvs in the Yolo county To the Public. WOOWLVXD, hept. 4, 189S. Having return d from Alaska and findirg my trade scattered, I oropose, to do business on a cash basis, hence from this date I will shoe horses for 80 cent? and set a light tire for 40 cents, nnd evfrythintt else in my line in proportion. Having had thirty years' experience, 1 feel confident my work Hill prove satis- fiutory. ROBHRT HCGEHOOM. Now ia trie time to have your summer suit flxed up like new. do to F.ckhxrdt, the tailor. Cleaning and repairing n specialtv. Satisfaction gmtramefcd. Armstrong Alge block. No. 1 inch hoM- reduced from 13 to 9 cents ft foot, iU Ruho Crans- i i i ton'c, eocceeeorl to Kstiito of H. B. j Wood, jyOtf Leithold'a darkroom is all right. AM customers are welcome to use it. Rl9 Wheat Market. SAN KRAN n parnde. Officerh of the Alpha Literary Societj uere elected at a meeting held Tuesday ifternoon as follow a: Mibs Lizzie president; H.irry Porter, vice- president; MIHH VVilhf Dingle, eecre- try; ulerin Rhode0, treasurer; Mi Ktta Ilayden, librarian; MIHS Odn Smith, hiatonan Miss Kthel McIIenry censor; Clem Lowe, sergeant-ut-arms. The publication of a high paper will be commenced soon. It, viil he called The Omega and v, ill proba )lv be in folio form. C. O. Jr. will be the first editor-'n-chii i ii'l hi will be by Thomas AdamH, Od.i Truth ar.d May Hogg0. II Tberl Vanillin will he manag'M. The high dill without .1 fiiig some friend of the inntitution suggest feaeitile Hnd popular plat for raising the funds to one'. The will be aoout -toO. Sonic udd'tioiis to the library w nld al 'O be very acceptable. Hut of conrst the manv needed ud htioiip and irn- prov.-iiieritH vvili have to lie rnnde grad I-or broken nurtares, inso pkin .diseases and piles there if ono relinbli; remedy, DeWjtt's Uitch Hazel S ilvo. vV den von call for DeW'itt'e don't no- copt counterfeits or frauds. You will not be disappointed DeWiU'i Witch Haeel Salve. Corner Drug Store. DON'T KICK. R. Clark Thinks Certain Critittau Are Unjust. Talk about your program I he Republicans of Solano county are nan pure programmers, and don't know it, Saturday last they met in onvention at Vacaville. It Is generally -opposed that conventions are for the purpose of making nominations. Not o this one. It wae merely a ratification Express. Now, my dear Express, did you not snow that quite a large number of ward 0 jliticLms from Vallejo were up here at >ur late convention, attending both the primaries and the convention, and learned just how to do it? They saw the push in Woodland at the primaries, with tueir tickets all written out and held in the fingers of the "b'boys." They saw tho little anide boas' election clerks and judgea at every polling place just as aoon as the heelers were there. They Saw them try not to wait until the business men got around. They saw the tickets all quickly thrown into the hat and counted and the polls de- clared closed, wherever they could do it, before the people generally knew a primary was on. Then they waited for the convention, and saw it. They saw the committee on order of business se- lected and the order of business written up tne night before the convention. They saw the platform and resolutions all fixed at the eame time. They saw the order of business shaped in a way that was never heard of before in a Republi- can convention in California. They saw the two candidates of the posh three, the gentleman from who waa thrown the night before the convention. They heard the order to ratify on the next day at the convention, and they saw it all carried out to a T. They saw large numbers of good Republicans go away disgusted. But what of that? They had learned something. They had learned bow to do it, and they went home and did it. 80 why are you ob- jecting? You should compliment them on their apt scholarship. Another thing they learned while here was that federal office-holders were not prohibited by the civil service rales trom running politics. They learned that Hart North, who is some kind of a Chinese inspector, or immigration com- missioner, who, they say, has forgotten the location of his office ie San Francisco, here aiding our deputy collector in running the convention. They learned that a man could hold the office >f deputy collector at a salary of or something like that, and the office of countv assessor at the aame time at a lalary of per year in open viola- tion of the constitution of the State, and run politics of the time, Yes, they leutned a whole lot, and for a. paper here at home to take them to 1 ask lor putting then knowledge to niaetical use don't seem exactly the correct thing. You see those Vallejo and Benicia fellows are no mid when they see a good thing they know it. The only difference between our convention and theirs was they said, "To with the no'rthern part of the while it seems ours copied the immortal language of Vanderbilt, and implied, "To with the people." R. CLABC. Enforcing an Ordinance. B. M. Lelong, who ran over V. 8. M.-Gliitchy, editor of the Bee at Sacra- mento Lint rhursd iv evening, has been found unilty of fast driving and sen- tencen to a fine of Under- MieritF who was racing with Le- lonu at the nine, was discharged, as he dn not ii'ipenr to be in fault. MUlKiiiH AWMjr. It i-< IT tunny gratifying to the public 10 know ot one concern in the land that i- i or t'fr.iid to be generous to the needy it d Miflermg. The proprietors of Dr. IUMK'- Discovery for Consumption, Couirii-j Colds have given away ten million trial bottles of this medicine have the aatiRfac- knowing it hop absolutely cured t hou" ind" of hopeless cases. A'sthma, bronchitis, hoarsenese, and all diseases n throat, cheM and Innga are surely by it. Call on W. H. LaWsOn, drugeiet, H rid ret a trial bottle free; reg- UMI 50o and Every bottle trnaranteed, or price refunded. Karl's Clover Root Tea, for constipa- tion, is the beet, arid if after using it yon don't sav eo, return the package and tret your money. Sold by the VVoodlnnd" Pharmacy, J. V. Lei t hold, pronrietor. Subscriptions tnken for any or newspaper published, either Gen tu English, at, news stand. RlOtf Dr. Grant's office ia now over berg's.   

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