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Woodland Daily Democrat: Thursday, November 6, 1890 - Page 1

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   Woodland Daily Democrat (Newspaper) - November 6, 1890, Woodland, California                               VOL. XXVI WOODLAND, YOLO COUNTY, CA.L.. THLTRS3 VY EVKNltfG, N JVEMBKR G, NO. 134. A BAGGAGE MAN'S YARN, HE WORRIED OVER A COFFIN WAS CARRYING IN HIS CAR. Thought Box Contained th. Murderer, Bad It The Olnoovery Caused Hli kml Wan Hli Mother. "We H.re not a superstitious set gener- erHlly." remarked a grizzled baggage mas- ter of the Pittsburg, Fort Wayne and Chi- cago roncl the other day as ha lighted a cigar ID the Grand Pacific und sat down for a talk. "We are not superstitious, but become uncustomed more or less to the presence of death in the corpses that are transported In the baggage cars, for a day scarcely goes by but ire have from one to three as the boys cull them, on board. Yet there IB always a check held on one's impulses A fellow don't feel like letting himself out naturally when he knows that A corpse la in the game room with him, or at least I can't, and I'm nearly as tough as they grow, for I've been OD this road for fifteen yearn. "What I wanted to tell you about hap- pened several ago At Tort Wayne, OK we were corning west, there stood a cof- fin box on the trucks ready to be loaded into the cur It vrns marked for Denver, and we were to carry it aa far as Chicago. By the side of the trucks, with one baud upon the hot, stood a young and well dressed man, with a band of crape tightly pinned around his silk hat, and known at a glance to be iu charge of the remains Whenever any one accompanies the corpse we always handle it silently and gently out of respect for their feelings, for there's few of us but buried our own, and know how to feel for a fellow who sorrows fora loved cm a THE BAD FACED STRANGER. "After ibowinj; tickets the young man asked permission to ride in the baggage car and wits refused, of course He went Kway hurriedly and disappeared in the depot. We saw ao more of him until the train was ready to poll out, when he ap- peared at the door with a permit to ride In the car signed by the superintendent That settled it with us Hii box was part- ly covered with trunks, aa the car was crowded and the run unusually heavy. 'Please remove those trunks.1 was the first thing the geutlemso said. "We complied with the request, and the passenger sat down beside the box on a grip, resting his elbow upon the cover toward the bead He never Htirred from that position, It n-an to tay his cheek Hgainst the rough pine boards, and 1 saw tears trickle down his handsome face. Who W'IH It Covered Say, Tom vml ray mate on the run, bat fellow's either mighty soft on tha "stiff or else he's KOI a live pal in there what he's away with.' "That was n stunner The papers were full of just Siich and possibly thin fellow had T.iveou cooped up there and wax spiriting him out to the mount- ains. 1 didn't propose to allow anything like that to get by me, and so 1 laid a plan to trap the fellow and turn him and his charge oier to tlie police. The more 1 thought over the matter the stronger I WM convinced that the attention paid to the was unnatural and put on. OFEJTISG THE BOX 'Will you wish a lunch at 1 inquired of the stranger when we reached Plymouth 'Will they briny It to the carf said the young man t if you want to order dinner we will tend one for three in Etead of two 'Will everything lie in anx- ionslv asked the faithfu! watcher. 'Oh, we'll lock car.' 'All right, I wish you would make an order for without another word he turned bnck to his charge, and I don't believe he stirred in that forty mile run. "Instead of sending an order for dinner I telephoned the sheriff of Porter county to be at the depot with tools to open a coffin box and coffin, for I thought I had a prize. I then instructed the young man was helping me to jump out of the car as soon ns we had loaded the baggage, and to go into the eating house with the stranger and keep an eye on him, "When ue reached Valparaiso there were twenty minutes for dinner, and it took us but a few minutes to load up the trunks. The sheriff stepped up and iisked me if I was the baggage man I gave him the wink and said 'You will find the baggage man here after and swung out on the plat- form, followed tiy my assistant and the westerner The sheriff, who caught the cue, was persistent, and so, calling to the others that I would be m in a minute, went into the IjHKgige room and around the other mile of the train, gaining en trance to the bagir.ige cnr through the op- posite door from which we had left, and J hud purposely opened. All was clear sailing now, and it took but n, sec- ond to run the up and liftoff the lid DISCOVERED HIS PARCS'T. "There rested neb coffln, and we botli drew back nghast aa our eyes fell upon the plate which bore the inscription MOTHER. In Help e rate "I left Guatemala with in F. W. SihultK to a Chicago Times re- porter, "but 1 would not venture the ex- periment to bung tliut little with me again foi anything under the RUII Mr Scbultz is a. merchant m the little Central American republic who came to the United States to attend to some pri- vate matters tliat deiiuLiided his immediate presence. "Guatemala was us near the verge of ation anil utter bankruptcy three weeks ago as any state experienced. Wuen 1 reached San Jose and was about to embark I heard that the iiasacugers on hoard the Colima, a vusael that hrui sailed afewdajs before, h.ul beeu searched for valuables, and that all coin, sold and sil- ver found on them had been confiscated by order of President Barillas, I secretly made up my mind that the Guatemalan government should not scoop in my riches The financial condition of the country was such that illas had to issue such an or- der. The paper money was worthless, and the credit of the country of little good. I "Etery resource to keep up credit had 1 failed, and it was only through iheer des- peration that the president made such an order. Well, I had my coins sewed np right ou the soles of my shoes There were eight or ten gold piet.es and several dollar pieces. When the search was made upon me I only had a few copper coins But the officers suspected I had hidden my money, and with that suspicion they subjected me to a rigid examination had to pull off my shoes Fortunately they did not touch them, else the weight of them would have given me avrjy For about ten minutes the cold perspiration just trickled dowu my forehead. What would they have done had they discovered the trick? I hate, really.to think of it. Certain it is I should not haie been here today to tell jou." A DANDY CRUSTACEAN. ALL ITS TIME SPENT IN OUTGROW- ING ITS OLD CLOTHES. 'It looks like said tho sheriff, beginning to unscrew that part of the casket which covers the face. It was a most generous countenance I beheld. The hair was sprinkled with gray, the fore- head, vt hich wns high and of marble white- ness, waa partly covered with the stray carls that had oscupMl the comb. About the throat, otherwise nnornamented, waa strand of penrt-t clasped with a diamond brooch of a peculi.ir design. The dress was silk. But the fiicel It seemed a part of my life Where hail those features bent over mef Where had those lips whispered to me? Where had I seen that The emotions of the old baggage master overcame him, and for a moment his bead down into his bands, and framo trembled with the intensity of the feeltnn ha could Kcarcely reprens. He finally raised nil eyes and continued in a huaky Totce. "Tho sheriff quietly rcpinccd tho cover- our hands bad so eagerly removed. "When the two came back I felt weak trembly like, nr.d did -not look either of them in the face. "I said to tho 'Did yow ever have n UrotherV 'I have been told so, but he left before I waa born They say he ran away, or -wan kidnaped when 0 of age. t never SAW htm Itii name Tom.' "'I your brother Tom.1 A firmer near Atlanta, On.., not needing coffin he bought for hia sjek child, thi tattar netting well, mounted It on (ourleg maA twist it M watering trough for hi The Use of TTater and Suit. Salt iss ail absolute essential to the diet of man It promotes health in various waya Many of the functions of the body go on better under its influence, and without it the blood Incomes impoverished. While a complete deprivation of salt would pro- duce disastrous results, an excessive use of 1 it would scarcely he less harmful. In large it acts as an emetic; in quanti- ties beyond the requirements of health it irritates the stomach and intestines and sometimes purges. Those who use salt unusually freely almost always suffer more or less from constipation To drink large quantities of water daily should be the rule with those who suffer from constipation Each day the system needs at least two quarts of water, as about that quantity is used up or thrown out of Jt ei ery enty four hours Fruits and vegetable foods contain much water, and in tea, coffee, soups, etc., considerable is taken habitually 111 all ways, as stated, about two quarts of watsr should enter the stomauh daily. It is a stood plan to drink due or two glasses of watei from half an hour to an hour before e.vtmg breakfast And it maj be either hot or cold as preferred Which- ever is used, the njiter should be slowly sipped To deluge the stomach with cold water would be to 101 ite dyspeptic trou- bles Herald Hlgli Speed ni aii Klvineiit of Safety. It bas been said thnt when the danger collision arises if the vessel is slowed down she will haie time to get out of the way Thls, as a matter of fact, is a, fallacy. The faster a ship steams the more fullj ia she under the command of her helm, and this is especially true in the present day of steam steering genr, when the quartermas- ter hus uuhmited poner at bis command to put the belm over quickly Ocean liners will ueier go slow enough to enable them to stop and go astern in the event of meet- ing in a fog Captains will always depend on the ma- Delivering qualities of their ships, and, as already stated, the faster they go the more quickly will the rudder act, so that speed, which from one point of view ia an element of danger, has us counterbalancing advan- tages. The opinion of our beat skippers inclines toward the greater safety for their ships being obtained at high speed in the matter of danger from collision in case of meeting other steamers in a York Commercial Adi ertiser. for One's Own Dinner. It seema that Mr. Depew's dinner at Homburg when he dined in company of the Pniue of W.iles tost him precisely 13 marks Twt-he marks, it may be men- tioned for the benefit of those who are not familiar with German currency, represents nearly It seems somewhat strange that the Prime of Welles should invite people to dine with him at his hotel and then allow his guests to pay foi their own dm- UBI, but thih, I understand, is the Hom- bnrt! custom und mie to w hich Jfr Depew, under thu circumstances, eheerfullj scribeil subscribing the ft) The Prince of ia doubtless keenly alive to the futt that there are n greut many Amei loans ho would willingly subscribe marks instead of 12 marks for tlie purpose of absorbing soup and toy ing an entree in royal company. In- deed, if the pmilege were put up at aue- tiou I should not be surprised to see it knocked n for a much larger lig- York Woi Id The JurioHt AVnturuielon. I am often asked why watermelons (ire so exceptionalH delicious when eaten on the ground they grow on The reason Is tins. When a grower wanta to treat his friends he selects >i melon with it very thin skin. These arc always the most delicious, and they ure ftlwujs, to tic found m a water- melon patch, but they won't stand along railway journey und have to lie kept for local coiiMimption. Most farmers prefer the toitghfr and thicker skinned variety, because chest; stand weather variations better and w ill travel as comfortably as pig iron The thin skinned melons are of Spanish in: rodiiLtion and arc truck prized in the where the chrome htat brings them to perfection. St. LonH Globe-Dem otrnt. Tbe litfe uf Ho In- and Whin the Fiwor of FUJier- men ami W lie re He la Caught. Han ami FlHti Are Enemies. The ahedder club IH known to fishermen equally well as an excellent bait and a costly article nf merchandise The rest of mankind is not ao well acquainted with him, yet he is a verj interesting fellow Ail kinds of fish show a high appreciation of bis fine qualities which a long ivjy toward proving that fish know more than we are disposed to give tliem credit for, Norii the crali at all ignorant of the active demand, for as soon .is he reaches tlie shed der stage he necks the stuctust seclusion which hit surroundings The cnili is tlie Heau Hrummel of crusta- ceans, and indeed no In ing creature givea BO much time ami .iltention to his wearing apparel. Compared with him In this re gard the extremes! dude leads a curelesa aud easy life If he were a memberof the human family his tailor'-i bills would con- sume his entire earnings. All of this may sound ridiculous, but it is seriously said, for the metamorphoses of t lie crab are ex traortiinarj. From the time he leaves the egg till he arrives maturity he pusses through njora and more frequent transformations than probably any other member of the animal kingdom In his infancy beisso unlike bimself that for centuries he was Mistaken for a nondescript, and it was not much more than fifty year-s ago that tils identity was even suspected HOW HE IOOKS. The female crab carries her eggs, thou- sands, probably hundreds of thousands, in number, in a greai semi-sphei'JciU bunch under her belly until they sire hatched, from th.it time tlie young crib has to look out for himielf, and that he is moderately successful in this regard is attested by his presence in vast numbers along our shores from Maine to Texas On emerging from the egg he looks somewhat like an impos- sible combination of those omnipresent products of New Jersey, the flea .ind the mosquito, or, to speak more definitely, be bat. a flat, irregiilnr ahaped body, with a long prolfoscis, a longer tail, long swim ding appendages, with spine coiered, toe- like branches it the ends, and proportion ally enormoui eyes, not attached to stalks as In later life, but axed flat upon the heart All of these peculiarities are compressed within a minute fraction of an inch In this stage he around mostly at the surface of the n-fiter, was for it long time called zoea, for w.int of a better name and position in the animul kingdom Like tbe nicknamos of human infants, it stuck to him, and his infancy Is stilt called the stage But this is not all. In his early youth he wan the tictim of another zoological mis- take Having shed 1m skin A few times increased in his eyes have appear ed on statkn, like those of shrimps ha.re been dei eloped, and nippers have been added tn the pair of front legs, but his family likeness it still undiscoverable, and he was therefore regarded as a distinct .tnd solitary genus, aud therefore called megalops HtS RAPID GROWTH. This, in which the tail and proboscis nearlj if not entirely disappeared, is even now called the megatons stage After more shedding of his skin and further grovtth he tiniilly appears as a mmuture crab about an eighth of an inch long Being ready to begin business as a crab he abandons swimming as a profession and takes to the bottom, goes foraging ittoug the shores, or attaches himself ou floating seaweed. The crab literally grows by shedding As fast as his (jarmentb become too Small for him he costs them off and appears in a larger suit. He is familiar to Salt water fishermen in nil sizes, from that of a tack head to a silver dollar, but how often he Sheds his shell 111 these early stages of his growth is not definitely known tt must, however, lie very frequently, for even after be has reached the edible he sheds once a month Men who make a, business of hunting him qay that hia time Of shed- ding is the full of the moon After he at- tains his full growth he ceases to shed, aud indications u re not wanting that he reaches a ripe old age, as specimens have been taketr with full grown barnacled and oys- ters attached to their shells, showing thut they had been wandering about the deep for some years at luaht When a crab is about to shed his shell he seeks shallow ater, find secretes himself In the roots of the gi usata or under bundles of sedge, so as to be as much its possible out of the of the Ush, which, ru, bafoie intimated, are veiy fond of htm at tlmt and witi-ri und u-bere to look for him The striped and other large flsh taken along the margins of rivers and creekfiare there, looking for shedder aud soft craba Sharks are aKo fond of them One day the writer saw a shark at least ten feet long carefully searching a mud fi.it mBitrnegat Bay forcruhs There little water on tbe flat, and tlie dorsal and caudal tins of the big flsh were both several inches above water. A Promising Fiber riant. An official ri pnrt to the Belgian govern- ment tlmt the "guimbobo" or of ihe Mexican state of Vera Cruz, postessis a fiber finer and stronger than silk, and of a sm-ilar luster Experi- mcnto alre.idy matin are aaid to indicate that the gnimbotio differs essentially from ramie, cotton and hemp In having the plnnt covering around the filler instead of mixed KI> ami interlaced with it. This makes It pr.tcticable to seporate and re- move tho hark by means of machinery The plant grows luxuriantly with little care, and produces n highly esteemed food In addition to the Trav- eler. ___ There nro not one but hundreds of men in Now York who spend from to on gnrmcnU which never Been by anybody MVB their Uun- or their wfrea mnA Tftleta, If they HOW HE Fishermen have coined JL number of ex pressive for the different stages through which this cr.ib pnsses ill shedding his shell A comer" Is a crikb in the first stage, when a new shell is a mere (ilunjcnt or thin nuJnibninc under the old In the "Bhetliter" stage tbe new skin is n thick, soft, ei.Lstic envelope to which the old shell h.us cert-veil tondheie, and from which it sepiiriittis rtadiij. wen on tbe claws and feet. When readj to shed tin- Old shell separates nearly all round the iif'iy the base of (he legs, and the cmb withdrawn itself. Theshells of the cluws and are not broken nr cniLked, but the new akiu ''IH so soft and yielding, and the muscles in such a flaccid ennil it that tlie limbs are drawn through the small openings at the joints miith us a sack nearly filled with Borne flmil may be drawn through ftn open inn much smaller than the Mack itself When be is ri-udy it takes the crab only about (he mmutrs to get out of his old shell Then In: is the "soft shell" crab, so (HUMblc for frying and so dear to the pal ate of the epicure It is tint K tore. WMI aid .f Second, IS blocks South of DRS. CURE ft GUY, Phyelolane and Offloe ovar New York Store, Main attention to dlwuei or the Ev EL1Z BETH I. YATE3, M. D. Rhyelolan and Office over Dr. DrtV SUtr tealdeuce, BUS Third utreel. U A u. and a to 4 p. u. W. A. 6. TON BRETIAN, AJJD EQ.UINE DENTIST. office: Sooond hoowt aoi i novti MtllB. D8, B. 8. CAMPBELL, Dentist, Woodland, Oa. two doors o> Houae. Main Htreat, Woodlmd. Oft A. N. DICK, M. D., Dentist, Woodland, Oa.1. One doot Wwitor Sank, of WoodUtoo .u Main SUxMt. _ V. H. C'.iSOH, Resident Arohltoot. WOODJLAUD, CAL. Plans, fully prepared. Office. No. S, Delta Blowk. I. C. BALL, Attorney at. I_ Office over Bank ol Woodland. R. L SIIPSOR, Attorney at Law Will practice In all the Courts. Offloe wltb J. O. Bull.ovttr Bunk of Woodland. F. E. w. M. BiKEB ft GR1KT, A t to r n oy a a. t Boome 1, and 3, Bxoelilor BIMK, Wood- A. HAWKINS. J, CRAIG t HAVKIHS, AT LAW. 3, B aud T orar Bank o Woo land. WOOIJLAND, DRS. HER ft BEEBE, Phyelolane Office In Pond Drfig 8ce Hours: 9 to 1M A. M. Btreet. and Cross. Woodland. SONS. QKA.T GRIT SOUS, Prescription Druggists OASBT A Dregs, Piteut Mdlcines, Tollot Artid SCHOOL BOOKS, tACKSOft CAPITAL 0 HOTEL Sacramento. strictly FrM Tram B. B. BROWN, formerly of Union Hotel. 1 irtf Bank of Yolo, WOODUlfD. OAK. H. f. MBIUUTT   

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