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Van Nuys Valley News Newspaper Archive: July 10, 1973 - Page 1

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Publication: Van Nuys Valley News

Location: Van Nuys, California

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   Valley News, The (Newspaper) - July 10, 1973, Van Nuys, California                               TODAY'S VALLEY WEATHER I'atciiy low clouds and log in early morning becoming sunny in .afternoon. Highs between !M and 102 degrees, lows 58 to 01. A PCD predicts light eye irrita- tion from smog. NORTH VALLEY EDITION 64 PAGES and GREEN SHEET Established 1911 VOL. 206 HOME DELIVERY BY CARRIER SUN., 1UES., THURS., FRI., MONTHLY TUESDAY, JULY 10, 1973 Mo-! Address. P.O. Box 310, Von Nuys, Colif. 91408 I4b39 iylvon Street 340-0560 342-6101 786-7111 lOc Copy Compiled from the wires of United Press International In a suit filed by the state of Florida yesterday. major oil companies were accused of causing the gaso- line shortage by conspiring to keep prices high and force out independent dealers. "Our position is that there is no shortage." news- men were told by Florida's attorney general Robert Shevin. "The alleged shortage is the result of anticom- Imuortant wire news will be found on Page A-14 petilive practices manipulated by the major companies to drive out their competitors." The antitrust action, filed in U.S. District Court at Tallahassee, is the first of its kind by any government agency, Shevin said, but others will probably follow. He mentioned specifically the possibility of legal action by the Federal Trade Commission. In a report disclosed recently, FTC said the structure of the oil industry is a major factor in the nation's fuel problems. Named in the Florida suit are Exxon, Texaco. Gulf, Mobil, Shell, Atlantic Richfield. Phillips, Continental. Sun. Union, Cities Service, Marathon, Standard Oil of California. Standard of Indiana and Standard of Ohio. RENO, Xcv. (UP1) A Sparks man and his brother said they arc cashing in on an old legend that divorcees throw their wedding rings into the Truckee River. C. H. Carpenter and his brother Ralph, of Mobile, Ala., have been using a gold dredge near the Virginia St. bridge to hunt for wedding rings and coins. Carpen- ter says the old story is true. "We've found a glory hole down there." he said. For example, Carpenter said, they found three wedding rings. 270 pennies, a half-dollar, several quar- ters, dimes and some buffalo nickels on one day alone. In Washington, the Nixon administration de- nied again yesterday it is considering rationing gaso- line. The denial was phrased in the most positive lan- guage used so far. Asked about the persistent rumors that rationing on a nationwide scale is likely, William E. Simon, depu- ty U.S. Treasury secretary, replied: "Absolutely not. I absolutely do not consider ra- tioning even possible. We have a voluntary allocation system in place now that 1 believe is doing the job." Indicating Washington had taken notice of the widespread doubt about whether the gasoline shortage is real or the result of manipulations, administration sources reported the administration's Phase IV econom- ic program might include a rollback in petroleum prices. The administration's voluntary fuel supply pro- gram is a "colossal il was alleged Sunday by Sen. Thomas F. Eagleton. who sponsored a bill giving Presi- dent Nixon authority to order fuel supplies sent Jo energy-short areas. "Instead of using this authority." Sen. Eagleton .-aid in a statement, "the administralion has fiddled around with its so-called 'voluntary' program, which lias been a colossal busl." The possibility of rationing of another kind was raided meanwhile by an expert on world food produc- tion. Americans may soon forced to ration food in order to maintain exports and the dollar's value abroad. he warned. Domestic food rationing would be a letter allerna- 'nc to Nixon'" controls on exports -did Lester 15. Brown, an economist for the nonprofit Development Council. The export control.- were described a.- ;i ini.-takc" by Urown. who directed international .lUricullure development for the I'.S. Agriculture Depl. from to The Micgcstioii rationing brought a p :n Angeles from Arlinc Mat hews, cofoun- of Fight Inflation Together. "I can siy unequivocally that the American con- "timer will not 'buy' rationing 'of when we have >ufficient domes-tic Mrs, Mathews said. She cited the recent massive slaughter of chickens as an example of food supplies being plentiful in this rountry. Also, bhc called attention to the subsidizing of food j-hipment.- overseas. Lending MibMancc lo Mr.-. Mathews' ,-tatement a report yc-K-rday from congressional investigators. the of U.S. wheat to the Soviet I'nion ia-t for ?lv. mrrenl high prv-c of food The n< V .mint.' Office, ii-ve-iitjatnr arm Continued on Page IS TODAY'S ir Andcrton Clatiificd Cfotford Puttie CvrrcMlf Foge A-2 33- A Page 7-t B-S STCTC CNinjien Empfoymcnt Q A A Fflmt-Tctnpo lost A-26 Poge A-2I A-27 Poge B-4 Pege A-34 Northridgc Nc-i Page A-12 OufOvrWer Pegc A. 12 Perk Pegc A-J7 Pegc A-29 Pegc Pegc Sperh The Mner Vrtol Yewr Birthrfoy A-2 Pegc A.26 Pegc 8-5 Pegc 8-1 Pegc A.19 'News' Lauds Scholars of Two Schools Kennedy, Canyon High Students Get Graduation Honors Each June The News presents a special pictorial section of graduating high school sen iors who achieved high scholastic and service honors. Because of difficulty in scheduling this year, how- ever, two schools within the p aper's circulation area were not included in this section. They are John F. Kennedy High School in Granada Hills and Canyon High School in Saugus. Althoug'n photographs of the Gold Seal Bearers and Ephebians from the schools were unavailable, it is felt these students d e s e rve mention, and their names are presented here today. Cast Ballots Those named members of the Ephebian Society of Los Angeles have attained high grade point averages, but m o re importantly have demonstrated lead- ership ability, character and willingness to serve others. Classmates and faculty members cast ballots to se- lect Ephebians. Member- ship usually is limited to one of each 40 graduating seniors. Those who become life time members of the Cali- fornia Scholastic Feder- ation do so by earning, for a minimum of four semes- ters including one in their senior year, at least three As and one B. exluding physical education, and they must carry at least three academic subjects. Name Scholars This year's Gold Seal Bear ers from Canyon High School are Jackie Cargill. Kathy Akehurst, Yao Chen. Karen English, D i ane Ludwig. Carolee y ers. Jack Salisbury. Greg Smith, Mark Wilker- son and Mark Dehart. Honor scholars. Canyon High's equivalent to Eph- ebians, are Troy Gustaf- son, Paul Obert and David Rentz. Gold Seal Bearers of the Class of '73 at Kennedy High School are Kenneth Alfred. Cheryl Blair, Ken- neth Blakely. Kristy Bor- quex.. Mona Carlton. Cath- Jcen Carter. Michele Co- hen. Scott Custead. Den- nis Denby and Drasnin. Morgcn Others arc Aria .-ault. Mclunic Eiehel, El- Jen Karnsworth. Jean Gil- pm. Beth Goldowilz. Dar- Contimicd on Pace Three1 102 Forecast for Valley Sunny with .-omc high clouds arc predicted loday in the Valley along uiib uarmcr tern-  eMerday of degrees and a low of 54. Sunday's high 71 and lhe low was The Air Pollution Con- Continued on Pajrc IX Council Approves Measure to Protect Home Buyers By DURWOOD SCOTT Los Angeles City Coun- cil yesterday tentatively approved a "home buyers p r o t e clion ordinance" which has been in the dis- cussion stage for a num- ber of years. The ordinance is strong- ly opposed by the real es- tate industry. Under the proposed or- dinance, slated for final vote next Monday, all per- s o n s selling residential property 'would be re- quired to supply informa- tion to the purchaser on pending liens as well as authorized use and occu- pancy before the sale could be finalized. Target date for the ordi- nance to go into effect is September. The first six months would be a "test peri od" during which procedures could be re- v i e wed and necessary changes made. During the lest period, compliance with the new provisions would be vol- untary. Mandatory com- pliance would become ef- fective after the six-month tost. No vote Taken City Council yesterday approved by a !Mo-2 vole a building and safety com- mittee report calling for passage of the ordinance, which has been revised and discussed for about four years. Xo vole was taken on the ordinance since only 11 members were present and 12 are needed to pass an ordinance on first read- ing. Councilman Arthur K. S n y d e r, (14th District) and Marvin Braudc (llth District) voted against the committee report. Absent were Edmund D. Edelman (Fifth Dis- Gilbert W. Lindsay (Ninth District and Louis K. Nowell (First Snyder labeled the ordi- nance a "ding-dong proce- dure." He said the city can do nothing about the transfer of land or homes b e c a use such transfer "lies completely within the purview of the-state." Questions Raised Braude attempted to amend the committee re- port to insert a disclaimer concerning future zoning1 of land involved in trans- actions. "in affect, Braude's argu- ment was that stating at time of transfer lhat a piece of property was in ;t certain zone did not pre- clude a zone change at some future time. Other questions raised, including a query by Robert M. Wilkinson (i2th District) who ex- pressed concern that thii city might not get the re- ports out in time and t h c r eby would create problems for both buyer; and seller in sale and es- crow proceedings. Wilkinson was ful in amending the com- mittee report to say Lie city must provide the m- Continned on Page ttt Drugs: 49 Arrested in Raids Million Worth Seized Intensive Roundup With 'Undercover Buy Plan' Hits Valley, Venice Street Sellers Police said yesterday that 49 persons have been arrested and a quantity of narcotics and dangerous drugs seized in an in- tensive roundup by un- dercover officers. Total street sale value was estimated to be in narcotics and dang erous drugs con- CIRCUS PERFORMER Dale Uaer 10 demonstrates trapeze act while her mother Ernestine Baer holds rigging. Her grandmother. Mrs. The Xow.< Elisabeth Clarke and Jo Jo Monarch, right, show off costume she will wear. Uaer family of Tarxana has three gen- erations of circus performers in it. fiscated in the first six months of this year. Police Chief Edward M. Davis siad arrests, which have been going on since July 2, are continuing. Of the '19 arrested. 21 were juveniles, the chief said, adding that all the arrests took place in the San Fernando Valley and in the Venice area. Reduces Supply lie said police began ar- resting suspects who had sold narcotics and dan- gerous drugs to officers on previous occasions. The of- ficers posed as buyers. "The undercover buy program, which deals with narcotic and drug trafifc at the street level, Mib- s t, a n tially reduces tins availability of and dangerous drugs in lo- cal Davii said. Following is a list of seizure figures for the first six months of including street values: Haliicinogcns Listed I leroin. pound-. cocaine, 31.2U pounds, .s.j.02-3.101; mcth- adonc, 21C3 units, others, 2-121 units. H a I ucinogens: -Mari- j u a na, pounds. hashish, 1G.27 ounces and 10.66 ounces of hashish oil, LSD, 25.745 units, oth- ers. Amphetamines. units. bai- biturates. 81.001 units. S27.000. BAER'S LIFE A CIRCUS 3 Eras Under Big Top Represented by Family By PAUL LITSKY People have complained that their homes are like three ring circuses, but the home of the Baer fam- ily moth- er and daughter has for many years been just lhat a three-ring circus. Now living in the represent three j; e n e rations of rimis luich represents   It will dejx'ivl. on the of A-- sembly Kill 12G7. which ba< by the State and i-. awaiting Gov. Ronald Rea- gan's signature. Supl, of Schools William .1. .Johnston told the Board that Gov. Reagan is ex- Continncri on Page 18 (ounly Assessments Hiked; Most to Pay Less in Taxes Exemptions for Homeowners, Business Boosted; Further Property Rate Cut Due Bv BILL PACKER T otal assessments in Angeles county in- creased by 3.69% this year, but most property owners should less in taxes because of a variety of factors, including in- Mate exemptions. County Assessor Philip K. yc.-tcrday an- nounced that the total as- .-v-Miient roll hit a gross s 21 .in in rrca-c of .some (XX) over la.-l year. Another Reduction Watson said, however, lhat most .-hould pay in (axe-; this year because of the increase in homeowners' and business inventory exemptions from the state. In addition, tlie count property tax rate has been reduced already by ;-ents by the Hoard of Sn- The incrca-c i" valuation will reduce thf rate by another 6.23 cents per sioo of valu- ation. And indicated they reduce the amount even further by using federal revenue when they set th  l.ix is the counU and does no', include Jexied by other agencir.- .such as cities and sthoo' d i .slricts. 
                            

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