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Ukiah Daily Journal Newspaper Archive: July 27, 1966 - Page 2

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Publication: Ukiah Daily Journal

Location: Ukiah, California

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   Ukiah Daily Journal (Newspaper) - July 27, 1966, Ukiah, California                                UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL, UKIAH^ALIFORNIA WEDNESDAY, JULY 27,1966 utlast Jam- ft? . ,...-,Tf*e .gkme, is never, over-or ;*(06^unto the fiikjU out! This age-old baseball adage MUiff true again last night as the Vldah Pony League. Mi-Stars Mpirtttkect past Upper Napa Val-lejft^&Mr; in one extra innintr in Ai�PI).S^HP fe?*^ an excite^ ment-shakeri, unbelieving crowd which saw both teams go wild in overtime. score, was tied., at 5-5 at the "t^of the regulation seven Ntsttfeptt Valley, poshed acisp^f,run';ito:rtie it up. Napa *jta�xsed change its starting pitcher, cool and deceptive if not overly quick Allen Swank, a southpaw, because the revised 1966 Pony League rules appar- ently do" not allow a hurler to pitch nine innings in tournament competition in one game, as in the past, but own' only his regular-season sevepi . With file score tied but Napa Valley having first-ups In an inning Swank would-and perhaps should-have been the. winner, for four runs on just two hits, including a three-run homer to deep centerfield by Steve Mann. , Counter Explosion But if iyou think that explosion was something to write home about, wait until you hear what happened in the last of the eighth, with Ukiah at bat. Napa's relief pitchers simply got into .hot water early and before the eighth was over the game was won* by the team" that was four-runs down going into the last of it-Ukiah. Ukiah's hopes were pretty dim as Eiliott Lopez, a star pitcher (and batter) in. South Little League last year, stepped to the plate for Paul: Hage's Ukiah Pony All-Stars . to . open the eighth. Lopez, who went to right field in the seventh and in the last of the seventh had been at bat when Ukiah's potential- winning run in the person of Johnny Johnson was picked off second on a slick "hidden ball" play to end the inning, tied into a third pitch for a line-drive' double. Jay Sierens, who had ripped a single and double in three pre- vious trips, scored once and drove in a run, got hit by n pitched ball and Ukiah was on its way to victory. Anderson came in moments later., on a wild pitch after Mike Ttaibe had forced Sierens at second, but with only one down and one-run in Ukiah was scenting the km   .  Relief pitcher Tom Pepper helped win his own game with a sharp single that scored .Tate. Lead-off batter Tim Trotter wailed out a free pass and men came around as Pat Johnson singled to center and Trotter trotted across the plate as the centerfielder made an error. With three-runs in and two down after Pepper was cut down at second, Lilburn (Hcagie) Hoag-lin, hitless in four previous trips, came to bat.- Grandstand managers figured Hoagie might be lifted for a pinch-hitter, bul Hage let him bat and hp swung away to slash a line-drive single to score Johnson With the tying run. * Close But Wild That left it up to Johnny Johnson, who had one previous hit. and who had bejen the potential winning run when he was caught napping off second in the seven! th. Johnson, a fine athlete, came through with a game-ending single, scoring Hoaglin. Napa had pecked away for one run on one hit in the first, and scored once without a hit in the second to take a 2-0 lead. Ukiah got a' single by Johnny Johnson in the second but couldn't score, Johnson being thrown out steal-, ing. In the third Sierens opened, with a single and Mike Tate doubled after Sierens scored on a wild pitch. Tate came through to score as Pat Johnson got life on an error, to tie the score at 2-2. Napa scored again in ihe fourth to leaU, 3-2, and Ukiah tied it up fn the fourth with two down on Anderson's double and Sierens double. In the fifth Mark JVIasterson, starting Ukiah pitcher, tripled and missed a homer by inches to' start off a two-run rally and Trotter, drove him home with a single, scoring himself on two stolen ' bases and an error to make it 5-2. Ukiah appeared to be out in front to stay,, but Napa wouldn't give up either, and scored two in the sixth -and one in the seventh. That tied it up and Ukiah was scoreless the sixth and seventh, thanks largely to a sparkling catch in left field and thwarted stealing attempts and getting a man picked off second. The two teams renew their two out qf three series Thursday night at 8 in St. Helena and if a third game is needed it will be in Anton Stadium Saturday night at 7:30 p.m. The winner* of the series goes to Petaluma for the Sectional Pony-League All-Star tourney next Week. . It looked like both teams tried to give the game away at times last night-and tried just as hard to win it back. Ukiah got ft- and rrfaybe a bit of psychological edge. Napa lost one run at the plate and had another close call go against it at third-and Ukiah, except for the final and. extra inning-and the fifth, didn't look like it earned the win. But it got it. It also got twelvjljf hits to Napa's 10. Most important it got 10 runs to Napa's nine. Hart, Giants Have Broken 'LITTLE SPORT 3AN FRANCISCO (UPI> - -Jfei-^lay-War! was well^ojEbas way out of a slump today along with the San Francisco Giants _^_ who had" a three-game winning4-Houston 5-4, Cincinnati doWflS6T"PP I Chicago 9-6 and St. Louis edged P"" streaR-going and once more held down-first place in the National League -racer--- With Hart banging a- three-tun homer and adding a sacrifice, fly, the Giants defeated the Pittsburgh Pirates, 8-3,, Tuesday and knocked them.out of the Jop-spot by a full game. * "That's right," said -the-la-| conic Hart when asked 'if he felt he had regained form after going hitless in 18 trips."I'd been trying to pull outside pitches too much instead of just meeting the ball." . He boomed his' three-run homer, and 22nd of the seasony in the first inning off the Pirates' Steve Blass and then added la sacrifice fly in the seventh1* t after 4he  Pittsburgh Tommy Slsk (4^1) in~the-iast-of thev-three^am Elsewhere in the senior circuit,    New    York    nipped By Rouson Soviet Trackmen Way Off Atlanta 4-3^ In the American. League, Cleveland topped Baltimore 7-4, Minnesota tripped New York, 6-3, Washington clubbed California; 6-2, Boston bested Kansas City 8-3 and Detroit shaded Chicago 3-1 in the first game of a ~douDleheader.- The-nighteap-| was rained out. Tony Oliva is on top and the sky's the limit. The Minnesota rightfielder replaced Baltimore's Russ Snyder as die � American League's leading1- Matter Tuesday night with a homer and double -that raised his average to"-.331. IH: also helped the Twins score their second yictory over the SAN LEANDRO, Calif. (UPI) He won and kept his promise -Champagne  Tony  Lema  is to the scribes -both then and w Y righthander was -long- gone with his r~fourtff~loss in 12 decisions. - Blass now has failed to Inst tye 'distance' 19 straight times since .beateng Cincinnati'on April 19/lf**. was removed, for .a.' pinch hitter Tuesday .in the. third inning.' Hart unloaded in the opening frame^ after Blass had. given up two 'consecutive walks, with two: out. Then Tito. Fuentes 'hit .a fifan% to assure GaylQyd, Per* iGfWthis Kth win. against two jfefgte.  Bfothe�  righthander t ^p^S^Ef^S BfflVHe?^ &$toWfy-V&6h&   - - < It Ttifr;fifan$ held a 6-3 lead in f#&n� 'and" the Pirates' had men"     Tirst and second with .none out, "3^t this point, 'manae-;ers Herman Franks of the Gi-�ah~ts -and Hairy Walker of the ^Pirates got out thefr percerit-Jage* computers which at one 1 tx0�pi fintor- New York Yankees in 10 games this season, 6-3. Oliva has won-the batting championship two straig y*�ars with averages of -.323 and .321,- respectively, and is seeking to become  the. first player since Ty Cobb '(1917-1919) to win three in arrow. Tony "O" wotft say what' he tKiip it will Me to W th| lieftglWB'or ^aYl^�s�na> .level he can attain. But be oo|nts out that 'last August: and; September' were exceptional' months for him and cou|d be^fg^p. You know what I' was hitting.at_.thb timejast year?" QUva ^keoi^^ ' reporter at Yankee Stad^um^riiesday night "X was letting about .25. Then the base hits stalled-dropping in'all the time and my average really moyed.". 'Who Jcnows/ he goes on. "If that happens again I might get up to .360 or something. Of course, it jnleht m- the other way and I might only hit .266*.' Ail Ferrara's pinch single with one, out in 1he ninth -inning scored Ron Fairly with Los Angeles' winning- run ' and climaxed a two-run rally. Dick Stuart, who homered Jn the fourth for the Dodgers, Med off with a. single. John- Rosebpro singled and Fairly beat out a bunt to load the bases. Jim Gilliam singled in a run to tie the score at 3-3. After a forceout at the plate Ferrara batted fofV winning pitcher Ron Perranoski and sent.JS4,365 fans home with his liner down the leftileld line Sn^ps Tie ^Eddie Bressoud's sdxth-ihning single scored Cleon Jones frorh second to snap a 4-4 tie  and send the Mets to their .sixth straight victory over Houston New York scored -thtee runs with two out in the third as Larry Elliot doubled in two runs and Jones doubled home one. Bob Shaw won his eighth game in 17 decision's thanks to the four-inning -hitless relief pitching of Rob Gardner. Mike Shannon slammed two-run homer in the eighth inning after Hank Aaron had Dat-Atlanta ahead-3-2 with his 30th hortie'r of the campaign Tim McCarver also hit a home run for the Cards, who whipped Atlanta for the fourth straight game and sfent the Braves into eigtrth olaee. Al , Jackson registered the victory, his 10th against eight setbacks. . Deron Johnson blouted threeMrun homer during a four-rim rally 'in the eighth inning tor the Reds, who handed Dick Ellsworth his 16th loss. Jim Coker- and Tony Perez each belted a homer for Cincinnati while Billy WiUiams had two and Randy Hundley one for Chicago. � back home for the last time. The bodies of Lema and his wife   arrived -Tuesday   while federal    authorities-----in    the Midwest investigated the plane crash which took the lives of the Lemas and two - others' Sunday on a . golf course in Minister, Ind. Investigators found clo.se to $24,000 in Leraa's luggage Tuesday. Dr.. Albert Willardoj Lake County deputy coroner; [said about_..$20,0(M__Lwas-l in checks and the rest in British pound ; notes, which. Lema apparently won * in ~ the recent British" Open." ���>    -      . His first "pro job came after, a stint in the Marines. He served as an assistant at ' San Francisco. Golf Club. . Later Lema ?t0ok~^j- head" pro job at )ko, Nev./and joined_the tour 11957. with the aid of tw6"East Bay friendsr-Don Doten and W. D. Van Bookelan. His first win wag the Indio (Calif.).Open, an event held for in subsequent years whenever he won. , - " Lema rarely drank champagne himself, but the bubbly drink came to syrnbolize Lema's relaxed and happy personality which. made him one of .pro golf's^ most popular performers among fans and players alike.     x His career skyrocketed and in 1964, he scored- a. golf V coup when he won the British Open, the Buick,-Thunderbird, Bing Crosby and', the World Series of Golf .to join the, exclusive ranks of� pros who have earned more than. $100,000 in official prize mopey in one year: Lema never denied (lis reputation as $. ladies', man during his early: days On the, tour, but .in 1963, he married beautihu*^,,. red-hairedi, stewards * "Bfetty :. Ctine 'and became" an exemplary family Palm Springs Thunderbird invi tatiOn. For the . first �five years, Lema's winnings never topped the $12,000 mark but in the fall of .1962 things changed.__ And it was then that Lema picked up the .tajg of "Champagne Tonv." Noticing writers were drinking beer in the press room, he remarked, "Don't worry boys, you'll be drinking champagne if I win." man. He, moved to Dallas so tha"t his wife could* be* near to her friends. She was 30 at the time of her deaths Funeral ___._______services   for: the those who didn't qualify for n^fL^mas will be held Thursday at $tqn#igs By" United Press InternaObnal � UUlll Major League Standings American League WtJL. Pot. OB 66 34 .660 53 53 52 $0 46 45 42 44 43 Tuesday's Results Detroit   3   Chicago   1, twilight-- Det at Chi, 2nd, ppd., rain Boston 8 Kan City 5, night Minnesota 6 New York,^, nighT Cleve'and 7 Baltimore 4, night Washington 6 California 2, night W- L. Pet. OB San Francisco 60 40 Baltimore Detroit. Cleveland California Minnesota Chicago New York Kansas City Washington Boston 43 45 47 49 52 52 55 59 58 .552 11 ;541 12 .525 13% .505 15% .469 19 .464 19% .433 22% .427 23% .426 23% 1st, Pittsburgh Los Angeles Philadelphia St, Louis Houston Cincinnati Atlanta New York Chicago 58 57 52 50 48 45 40 40 47 47 50 52 .600 .592 .588 .527 .515 1 1% 7% 8% .590 11 464 13% 459 14 45 53 44 54.449 15 31 67 ,316 28. Tuesday's Result* San Francisco 8 Pittsburgh 3 St. Louis 4 Atlanta 3, night    t #I7-H UUab. CaBff. St. Elizabeth's Church in nearby Oakland. A Rosary wilU| be said tonight a,t St. Leander's Church here, where the Lemas were, married three years" a^o.' It will be preceded by public viewing at Santos Robinson mortuary-here.- Entombment will be in Holy Sepulcher Mausoleum, Hayward One Bad Inning Blasts South from Area Play South Ukiah's Little League All-Stars were eliminated from further 1966 tournament play at Lower Lake last night and it was the little brother of the boy who led Konocti to the area championship some four years ago Who-'had a major hand in Ukiah's undoing. Gary Cruz, like Jose (Skippy) Cruz, his older brother, is quite a ball player when the chips are down. While Jose's home run hitting paced Konocti to the championship a few years minsk, u.s.s.r. -mm) The Soviet Union scored a close victory over Poland in their two-day track and field meet but at ihe same time "lost" to the United States. ___Russia had a more' difficult time than was anficipated in turning back Poland, 174-155, in -i-me mee^ that was arranged after both countries" canceleTT scheduled trips to the United States- in protest against American involvement in Viet Nam. The Soviet men downed their Polish counterparts by a slim 108-104 margin but picked up a decisive 66-51 victory in the women's competition. A comparison of results here against 'U.S. efforts in last weekend's Los Ange'es Times i- , out ahead in seven of 11 .events. The Russian men outdid their American" counterparts ' in the 400-meter hurdles, T,500-meter run, 400-meter relay, 100-meter dash, the javelin and the hammer throw. The American women outdid the-Russian women, only in track events, winning oh a comparison of time the 100 and 200 meter dashes., the 880-yard run and "ther 8&meter hurdles. back, it was Gary's clutch \me-, Intemational Games shows that League Leaders ".National League g. AB- r. H. Pet. Alou, Pitt 87 327 48 112 .343 t, StL 78 266 39 88 .331 Omnte, Pitt ,93 386 63 127 .329 , Pitt 88 317 55 104 ;328 Alou, Atl 99 430 67;137 .319 Morgen, Hou 68 25 34 .319 Carty, Atl 88 276 35 85 .308 Helms, Cin 7J.296 34 91 .307 Allen. Phil �78 283 _62.87 .307 Willms, Chi: 98 390 61119 .305 American League  ;" -' g. ab. r. li. Pet. the Americans turned in better performances in 18 of 31 events. Of these, the U.S.. men drive single which broke open the game in the fifth and opened the flood gates for seven Konocti runs.-in a 7-1 victory over tihe South last night. Cruz also contributed, a bushel of I sparkling field plays, but when it came to fielding - or hitting, I there was nothing to choose be-I tween the two teams for five innings.. A three-run double by Gordon added to the frosting on Kon- octi's cake and sent it on to r>on Norton sprained an ankle, Thursday ' night'sf'Lower^ Lake    "A lotal of five other Chargers High School 6 . p.m.  Northern are also on the sidelines recup-Area finals against Napa Valley erating from various injuries Snyder, F.Rbsn, Bal 98 358 78 116 .324 KaUne, Deit 80 281 �8. 91 .324 PoweU.Bal 94 329 56 99 .301 S.Rbsn, Bal 100 403 67 121 .300 Crdenal, Cal 92 332 41 96 .289 Rchrdt, Cal 87 312 47 90 .288 fovar, Minn 74 234 31 67 .2861 Mantle, NY 81 256 ' 30  73 .285. -J_--------Home Runs for the right to meet the Southern Area champion at Sebasto-pol Saturday night,    ' Ken Hook, - who fanned eight, got the win for Konocti, while the  loss  went to tiring  Ron Oliva, Minn.   97 378 62 125 .3311Rjnehart, who also pitched real! World Soccer Field Completed LONDON (UPI) -For England, champagne. For Portugal, coffee and commiserations. For England, a place in the World Soccer Cup final on Saturday against West Germany. .rv.;,,^. w______ For Portugal,  a  consolation thrashed the Russian men 14-61 third place game Thursday while the Soviet women came \ against Russia,  a game they unhappily qualified for by coming-out on the losing end of the semifina's. Both went down by identical scores of 2-1, Russia on Monday to West-Germany and Portugal:.' Ai Tuesday to England. v> 5 The finalists are the teams about  which the Latins ra^l "Fix" when they won quarterfinal  games through allegjed biased refereeing. As England and West Germany celebrated their success Lowe, Norton Hurt ESCONDIDO, Calif. (UPI) - The injury list of the San Diego Chargers grew larger Tuesday when veteran halfback Paul Lowe pulled a muscle and end SAN LEANDRO (UPI)-A 19-year-old caddy hitch-hiked part of the way from his Arlington Heights, 'ill., home, to attend Tony and_-Betty Lema's funeral Thursday. Jerry Winters, who comes from a family of 13 children apd referred to_ Lema as his '^second father/' caddied for the gblfer several times since 1962 and had gone to Crete, 111., Sunday to watch his hero^play/l Instead, Winters came* hereto pay his final respects to a man he idolized. SAN LEANDRO, (UPfl-The family ..of Tony Lema has.* re^-quested that in lieu of flowers condolences may be expressed in contributions to. the 'Hanna Boys Center in Sonoma^ Calif, Coast Mound Aces SAN FRANCISCO (UPI) - Vancouver's Vem Handrahan clings to his lead, in latest official Pacific Coast League hurling statistics with a 2.38 earned run average. Manly Johnston of Indianapolis is tops in wins with 13 and Bill Singer of Spokane is the top strikeout artist with 141. Bill Whitby of Denver is league workhorse with 169 inning's hurled- "   ' 1 . �. �      DEER SEASON OPENS SATURDAY. � , AUGUST *tk Rifftff - Sfthtt Ammimltlaii. Hats - Rags Sp0ft-. & HoWiy National League: Aaron, Braves 30; Torre, Braves 26; Stargell, Pirates 24; Mays -and Hart, Giants 22. American League: F. Robinson, Orioles 29; Pepitorie, Yanks^ 23; Co'avito, Indians and Powell,. Orioles 22; . Kaline, Tigers and Killebrew, Twins 21. Runs Batted In National League: Aaron, Braves 77? Stargell; Pirates 70; Torre,, Braves  68;   Clemente; Pirates 67; Mays, Giants 63. American League: B. Robinson, Orioles Si; Powell, Orioles 74: F. Robinson. Orioles 71; Kjllebrew and Oliva, Twins-60. SONOMA COUNTY FAIR ?   Agricultural & Livestock Exposition .All new,-enlarged Flower.* Garden Show Free Entertainment Dally Carnivals and Exhibits ^^%^o|� family" i i\ 1 i i b ii t)  ! r.i tj the fatal .fifth; A couple bad breaks set up the single by Cruz or the teams might have .been playing yet.- Ukiah. got some beautiful defensive work throughout the jgame, but- couldn't score until Tim Shannon's pinch single in the top of the sixth brought in Mike Gulyash who had singled and stolen second and third.. It wasn't enough and Ukiah gave up its - hopes of a third-straight area, championship. They are linebackers Dick De- gen and Rick Redman, halfback prepared for ..their last2P Gene Foster, guard Pat Shea j minutes of play, criticism and and -defensive Ridge. end  Houston. argument stilt their heads. around Saturday, July 30,7:30 p.m. Complete Ranch Diipertal. Selling over 50 head, good broke Sgtfdle Horses, both geldings and mare*, including several top ( Registered Quarter Mares, colts and one Reg. Stallion. A real top bunch of tising horse* you'll like, and at your own price. Every horse sells. A sale you cannot afford to miss.     - Willows Livestock Market Willows. California - That's What The Boss Says -� And You'd Better Belieye It -- (Us Too!) WOULD YOU BELIEVE? 64 Impala, stick, sharp!   .   .   ...   .   .   , 63 Chevrolet Bel Air 4-Door, like new 62 Impala Hrdtop, stick, clean   ...... 61 Pontiac Bonneville, Vista, full power .... 62 Olds F85 Cbupe, real nice....... Any Many Others - Like 63 Ford Long Bed Pickup, custom cab .   . 57 Chevrolet Pickup, 6-cylinder, good .   .   . 57 Ford Pickup V8, overdrive   .   .   . .   . 57 Ford Ranchero, good ...   .          .   . '   .   "   " t. ' ''  *  " '  '   1   � ------V    i 1 Or - How About 59 Ford Station Wagon 6-cylinder, stick . .   $299 Two 58 Chevrolet Station Wagons Y8, automatic . $299 Two 58 Fords, 4-Door, 6-cylinder, stick . . . . $199 53 Ford Station Wagon, V8, overdrive .....   $59 . And Many, Many More - Low Prices  , Millview Auto Sales Ju�t North of Overpou ^ OW ^hwory 101 CThese prices good W�N<9M!^vt|^^^ to 8) $1699 $1299 $1199 $1099 $1199 $1299 $599 $599 $3?9 m   

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