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San Mateo Post: Wednesday, November 29, 1961 - Page 1

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   Post, The (Newspaper) - November 29, 1961, San Mateo, California                                4 Girls Woodside 'Attacker' TH San Mateo Post Volume 15, Number 47 DELIVERED EVERY WEDNESDAY MORNING Wednesday, November 29, 1961 Bulldozer at Hillbarn Beginning of the End See Page Two Supervisor Demands Full Court Use REDWOOD CITY-Beltcr ulili zation of courtrooms in San Ma teo county was demanded lodaj by Supervisor James V. Fitzger aid. Fitzgerald said he would support a move to obtain add! tional judge., for the county un less the San Maleo County Ba association comes up with a plan to provide full-lime use of the courtrooms. The supervisor had a couple o suggestions: 1. Appoint two judges lo each courtroom nnd thereby double the number of hours at actual courtroom use from 20 to 40 hours a week. Z. Adopt a calendaring sys- tem lhat will allow the substi- tution of cases in the event nf lasl-mlnutc settlements a n il postponements. A committee of the bar associa :ion was scheduled lo meet with .he supervisors this afternoon to ask the board's support of legisla .ion to provide four more judges [or the superior courl judges and two municipal court. At present there are seven supe- and five municipal courl judges in the county. Fitzgcrak said he would make his sugges- ts to the association commit- :ee at the meeting today. Need Judges "There is no question in my he said, "that under pres- ent operating conditions we need more judges. However, tliesc op- rating conditions need a thor- ough re-examination before the can be justified." Fitzgerald noted that long- mge plans call for tlic eventual ippointment of 12 additional udges and that courtrooms cost approximately each to construct. There are or soon will jc three municipal courlrooms in San Mateo and wo in South San Francisco. But superior courtrooms .are being used. In fact, the last appointee, Judge James T. O'Keefe, is hold- ng court in a room in the old courthouse, the use of which was mce declared to be unsafe. The Courtroom was rehabilitated for lis use after his appointment. Just Firewood Now Business Is Up in County Business transactions were on le increase in San Matco county uring the second quarter of 1961, cports the state board of cqual- zalion. The increase was 1.2 per cent the I960 second quarter busi- ess. Total value of taxable trar.s- ctions in the county during the econd fourth of Ihis year, accord- ng to Uie state, was f this total, worth transacted inside the various ilies, and was trans- cted in unincorporated areas. 600 End Strike of Phones Here Varianette Style Show Varianetto Mrs. Ralph program chairman Coppock of Sunny- vale, will present, for the hus bands and wives of Varian As- sociates, "Christmas Surprises" by Eva of Palo Alto, in the new Vnrian cafeteria at S p.m. tonight. There will a brief business meeting before hand. Adult models for the "Sur- prises" will be: Mrs. Jack Brown ot Mountain View, former Var- ianette president and wife of an engineer; Mrs. Vern Justus of San Carlos, Mrs. Ronald Eadie, Norma Johnson, and Pauline Traas, all of Palo Alto and em- ployes of Varian. Teen-age models will be: Miss Carol Blez, daughter of the Ed- ward Blczes of Sunnyvale, and Miss Cathy Goodman, daughter of the George Brownings of Los Altos Hills. The younger models will be: Betsy Donavan, daughter of the James Ponavans of Msnlo Park, Nancy Ward, daughter of the Curtis Wards of Los Altos, Jackie Rockwood, son of the Clif- ton Rockwoods of Los Altos, and Mark Tabor, son of Ihe Calvin Tabors of Sunnyvale. The Varianclte bowling group nnd decorations. Atlcr Ihe event, the Chrlslmas Irec will be pre- sented to the children's ward at Ihe Santa Clara county hospital. 2-Time Loser Linked to More Attack Confronted by Victims Just Inches A way Four women and girl vie tims of attacks in the Ba Area, including an 18-yeai old Woodside girl and a 21 year-old San Bruno gir have identified T h o m a Norman Lindsay, suspccte arolo in 1939. "How they ever let him he sheriff said, "I don't know. Ii hat's an example of a rchabilitat- d con, I would hale to meet one hat is not." SlarlccI at 14 Lindsay owns a three-page "rap heel." starting with a Nape ounty burglary at the age of 14, Authorities felt certain that the same man committed most of the recent attacks in the area because of similarities in the cases, nota- bly the use of a knife and the practice of leaving his victims bound and gagged. The 18-year-old Woodside girl stood face to face with Lindsay Saturday and viewed him through a one-way mirror. There was no doubt about her identification. Whitmore said. Woman, Sons Hurt in Crash WOODSIDE A Woodside housewife and her two sons were hurt Sunday when her station wagon skidded in (he mud op. Old La Honda road and slammed inlo an embankment. Monta R. Mcrrywcalher, 38, 45 Old La Honda road, lold sheriffs deputies she pulled to the right lo lei another car pass and lost control of her car on a sharp curve. The boys, David C. Schwcp, 11, furnish Ihe Christmas tree and Charles -Schwep, 9, were- treated at Sequoia hospilal for minor injuries. Mrs. Mcrrywcalh- er did not require hospital treat- mcnt. NRW BRISBANE COUNCIL to Mayor John Turner, Ed Schwrmlorlnuf and right taking over the reins of government arc Conrad Kclsch, city attorney. (Times photo) James Williams. Erftsl Conwny, .less Salmon, Federal Fallout Shelter Plan Here San Mateo county has been selected lo be tlie first local governmental unit in the Bay area for a federal government fallout shelter study, Capt. ,1. J. McGara- ?han, deputy district public works officera the Twelfth Naval District Friday ,old the Mayors Council of San Mateo county at the Villa Chartier. It may be one of the first in the country. He spoke at the session to give the first report here of President Ken- nedy's shelter program. "The million shelter pro gram voted Sy the Congress in August comes Under the jurisdic- ion of the U. S. Navy in the nine Bay area counties and (he slate if he said. "The district public works of- ice, which heads the Navy Corps if Engineers has the technical :now-how lo execute the pro- he added. "In the Bay area, San Mateo will Ire the first county studied." Of the money appropriated by he Congress, Capt. McGaraghan cported million was allocal- ;d for Ihe purpose of fallout shcl- er study. This was not intended o include a building program bill athcr to survey existing facili- .ics. Design Changes The remaining million is Brisbane Votes To Ban Poker VKKN KIIOOII cotmcilmcn, among their first actions lo or- ganize a municipal government, moved lo outlaw organized gam- bling and public poker playing palaces by introducing an ordinance prohibiting the playing of draw poker within city limits last night. Ordinance No. 1.1, among the first of a scries of new laws before the- newly organized council Monday, will prohibit draw poker acUitics; stockpiling s villi food and other essential ma- erials. and a nation-wide warn- ng system. The shelter study will be con- iucted by local civilian enginecr- ng firms in each county. These irms must first qualify by scnd- ng one or two or their engineers the federal government sheltei chool. The naval officer said the pro- ram is divided into three ihases: 1. Finding what facilities arc vailablc. 2. Completing design changes nch as the installation of proper entilalion in facilities decided pon. 3. (not described.I Under phase one, the Navy is loking for a number of commu- ity-lype shelters that can house 0 to 500 people, that is 500 square ect or more in size. These arc to withstand fallout nly. Capl. McGaraghan said the avy is interested in Ihe proper 'Cation of facilities as well as bility to withstand fallout. Tabulated After the information has been ompiled, it will be tabulated and in Washington, he (old the layors. The Navy hopes lo begin the udy in December and conclude in April, the captain said. After the tabulation is complct- 1 the Navy plans lo work with e city officials who will work ill) properly owners toward per- lission of use. An agreement must be executed at this polnl. Bay Area Dispute Over 2 Women .5000 Involved In Rift, Settlement Six hundred Peninsula .clephonc company workers vcrc back on the job today if tor a four-day strike of 3ay Area workers against ,bc Pacific Telephone Telegraph company and the Western Electric company ended yesterday. Their return also ended the un- isunl experience of hearing a crisp male voice respond when 'operator" or "information" were linlcil, as supervisors returned to heir normal tasks. Announcement of the settlement came at the end of talks that be- gan at 5 p.m. Monday. Cal Lord, president of Commu- nications Workers of America, Oakland Local 9415, emerged from the final bargaining: session nl. a.m. and announced: 'We have reached a settlement of the entire dispute on the condi- tion wo order the people back to work this morning." Confirmed A telephone company spokes- man confirmed the statement and said that pickels were already be- ing withdrawn. Approximately 000 persons in San Matco county were involved n the strike, A. F. Guerin, presi- lent of Local IH30 of San Matco. Communications Workers of said today, lie said that i mass meeting of union members vas held in the IOOF hall in Burlingamc last night anil that ncmbership was represented rom San Malco, South San Fran- cisco and the coaslsidc area from 'acifica to La Honda. He would ml say what occurred at the meeting. The strike began Friday to back up demands that two women op- erators .suspended by the tele- ihone company be reinstated. The CWA estimated that (1000 workers games even Ihough they arc oft the job Monday. lowed hy slate district. Elected said officials of 30 other Although t w o Frank WtJsh, president in Northern California and meetings at 5 end 1! p.m. W. W. Tool anti Die had agreed Monday night dispatched with business-like 1322 Marslon road in join the walkout unless the dis- iciency, both local cily and a resident of was settled. and visiting county and 'said the company had officials agreed the county's of last night's meeting thai there would lie no enteenth city probably will up with passing a scries action or rccrimina- some rough sledding in the ordinances on Ihe parl of cither or set up a municipal Electric. Congratulating Brisbane on "big step County Clerk John Bruning, who administered oaths of office to new city last night, caulioncd, "Your won't always be strewn with flowers, and you will have growing pains." Elected Ihe new cily's firsl mayor lasl night, John E. noted, "We probably have the Cily that it have an opportunity est treasury in the United Benson said last night discuss the mailer wilh Ihe We realize our job will take invite a ".Toss-section" in a study session. lot of time, but we are Bclmont residents to a Kenneth Dickerson noted for the large majority thai he will personally conduct (he council had discussed a for incorporation. At firsl we hall sometime in January ordinance "a few months have lo curtail many cily the reasons he and lhat Cily Attorney Sam ices for a year or Iwo. We the local had slated at thai lo have people beat us over advocated by the Ihe cily already had Ihe for not fixing a chuck Citizens for Butler over removal of trees in rcerc, a chuck hole there. rights-ot-wny. we'll get around lo announcement Ordinance The city treasury is a half-hour discussion is proposed, however, the with a donation from the city officials and a said, to discuss further corporation committee, of Ihe citizens feasibility of a new tree or- Turner announced. But, he the council's of thai amount is being spent for purchase of a cily deciding cily "policy." Mrs. Norman (lallaghcr, mayor stated that not only members of the BCBG, hut "all Elected mayor pro-tern was Councilman Edward Schwcnder-it, of BCBG, appeared to ask Ihe council where and when are welcome any time at any study meeting." matters arc is not only a matter of Named city clerk- until Ihe askeci specifically when but your the lires a combination city were made to retain said. clerk was Mrs. Marian ordinance 138 in added that the council "is now secretary of the adoption of a proposed to achieve the same ordinance, when the you people arc." 'Pads was made on capital council favors develop- Sen'ii Hifih school's nnnual projects, nnd when of Bclmont in a manner to sports flwiird niRhl will be was made to in increased revenue and Thursday evening at 7 p.m. in of urban keep down taxes, and in a man- .school cafeteria. Roy.s who discussion was touched which will work to the wol- for the Padres in the Intcsl BCBC, proposal of the Dicker- cross country, and lightweight hasknlhall w'M 1m cily adopt n tree ordinance, iii'l the request by the staled, "Bui we cnnnol ignore individual rights."   

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