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Redlands Daily Facts Newspaper Archive: April 7, 1954 - Page 1

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   Redlands Daily Facts (Newspaper) - April 7, 1954, Redlands, California                               Vol. I25B 64th Year No. 57 REDLANDS, CALIFORNIA, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 7, 1954 Twelve Pages 5 Cents Little Known Attorney May Be Named Counsel Jenkins Tentatively Agrees To Post For M'CarthyArmy Hearing "WASHINGTON Karl E. Mundt said today an attorney Uiat "Joe McCarthy never beara has tentatively accepted the Eisenhower Disagrees With M'Carthy H-Bomb Statement Reds Caused Delay On Bomb Says M'CarWry NEW YORK Joseph R. McCarthy said last night our nation "may well die" because ol an 18-month delay- in hydrogen French Reinforce Beseiged Fortress Paratroopers Bolster Defenses Against Reds bomb research which HANOI, Indo-China job of counsel of the McCarthy- was caused by Communists in the' mgl1 today Para' Armv investigation urovided the snuot-nment nf fnroif.r Prcsifipnt strong reinforcements into he implied tirtwui, inao-wima curj French high command today The Army investigation provided the Senate Investigating Subcommittee Truman. is satisfied with his background. Although no subcommittee mem- ber would confirm it immediately, ti e attorney was believed to be Ray Jenkins of Knoxville, Tenn. Mundt (R-SD) did not reveal the attorney's name. He told newsmen the subcommittee interviewed the prospect this morning and hoped to be able to announce hu ap- pointment late today. If there were no Communists in our government, why did we delay 1 the besieged fortress of Dien Bien [Phu. The defenses of the fortress were LJUL vriiT ijju VTV uvia j t. i i j f for IB months-delay our research the on the hydrogen he said, rmmd of tbe DatUe' "Peeted to "Our nation may well die because of that 18-month dehberale delay, you who caused it? join the Red attack- who already possess over- Was it loyal Americans or was ii whelming superiority of numbers, traitors in our French reinforcements were par- The Wisconsin senator said the delay was deliberate and brought ers achuted into the battered fortress as the Reds Mciti vt a-a iicn-isci uic aiiu UA L i d1 dl Mundt, temporary chairman of about even though our sives along the length of the Indo- the subcommittee, said the man afiencies "were reportine day Cmnese Peninsula in an attempt "definitely would not be available after d the Russjans were y> unless we make a further check of his background. jment of the hydrogen bomb." Complete Check t He made the charge during a "We're led to believe that if we filmed appearance on a CBS tele- could tell him we made a com- program. The dme was al- plete check'and are completely lotted him convinced, he'd say Mundt Edward R. said. The announcement came just one day after the resignation of Samuel P. Gears, the first man picked as counsel for the televised bomb public hearings. Sears, a Boston attorney, quit under fire yesterday only five days after he was ap- I feverishly pushing their develop- by CBS commentator Murrow to answer a previous attack against McCarthy by Mm row. to tie down the French Union troops and make reinforcement of Dien Bien Phu impossible. Prepare to Attack French pilots said preparations for a savage new Communist as- s were spotted on the west side Dien Bien Phu. Today's biggest actions erupted in Laos and Cambodia, far from McCarthy made no further ref- battered Dien Bien Phu, erence in his statement to the delay. His gram had been clays in advance. H-, Communist forces in Southern television pro- Laos thru5t across the Mekong filmed several battling French At the time rs niiles from the Thai- was shown he v.ras in Tucson, with his uife- on a three-day vaca- tion. Frequently he attacked Murrow land frontier. Sharp engagements also were reported in the vital Red River Delta. The sudden expansion of the war on new fronts overshadowed, for pointed. Sears bad told the subcommittee he had taken no stand on Sen. ______ McCarthy but 1952 newslsaying once thai China was de- Stories disclosed that he had iivered to Communism by the _ praised the senator warmly. '-jackal pack of Communists lying besieged French fortress The subcommittee and its new propagandists including Hie Dletl Been Pnu. where outnum- prospeet apparently were deter- friends of Mr. Edward R. Murrow. bered French defenders braced for v ordinarily" McCarthy'an attack Red remforee- 'I would not take time out! ments reported pouring southward. President Says He Never Heard Of Any HoWup WASHINGTON Eisenhower said today that with bis intimate contact with the Atom- ic Energy Commission, he had never heard of a delay in develop- ment of the hydrogen bomb as charged last night by Sen. Joseph R, McCarthy The chief executive, under news conference questioning, also des- cribed CBS commentator Edward R. Murrow as a friend of his. Murrow was attacked last night by McCarthy, who was responding to an earlier attack made by Mur- The President was questioned closely about a statement from Mc- Carthy last night that subversion in government had caused an ;18- months delay in research on the H-bomb. The President answered firs! that he had never heard of any delay. No Delay Mentioned Later, a reporter suggested that this reply mighf contain an impli- cation of some possibility of tnitb in what McCarthy said. The President (.hen said that he was not aware of the content of the McCarthy speech. But he added that he had been close to the chairman of the AEC and that the, chairman had never mentioned a delay. Furthermore the President repeated, he had moment, the savage struggle j never heard mined to avoid a repetition of the Sears fiasco. said, Mundt said the attorney was not {r0m the important work at hand from tne Red CninMe frontier. Rains Help French sudden tropical rainstorm well known nationally and the sub- to answer Murrow, However, in committee had not submitted his tnis ease, I fee) justified in doing name to McCarthy. He said the so because Murrow is a symbol, man did not volunteer for, the job, a ]eader and the cleverest of the but was suggested by someone Jackal pack, which is always else. at the throat of anyone who dares, A which which valley in is situated But the Communists uncorked a drenched the Dien Bern Phu The departure of Sears, who {oppose Communists and traitors." !surPnse m ,Laos- idn't last long enough to get on, He said Murrow sponsored "in Ttle Reds struck unexpectedly aidn the payroll or even discuss finan ces with the subcommittee, prob ably will delay for several days the actual sfart of the long awaited vitaUons to students and the point where Laos, Cam- to attend indoctrination schools in'Mdla and Thailand meet. job which trained' Freneb headquarters said the propagandists and spies are as-1 Communists successfully crossed hearings. They had been scheduled Signed to do in foreign countries J 2600-mile Mekong to its right to begin early next week but Mundt He said Murrow "followed One Rwt detachment at- said "foggy weather may delay the Communist line" as laid tacked the Franco-Laotian post at them a little." down by the Daily Moulapamok, Local troops and Stung by charges of Worker and the Communist mag- neutral guardsmen have been re Mundt issued a long statement de tailing the subcommittee's difficul- ties in obtaining suitable counsel. He disclosed that he, McC'ellsn, the and Sen. Henry M. Jackson (D- -Wash) had even gone lt> Chief Justice Earl Warren with a pro- latest posal that a federal judge be given enee special leave to handle the case. Political Affairs. He said i sisting the Viet Minn rebel assaults azme Murrow, "by his own admission a member of the L W. W., Industrial Workers of the World for hours, the French an- nouncement said. Supply Line Cut The French also disclosed that after the program and Weather 'applied for membership." Southern California: Coastal and CBS announced that it Murrow answered McCarthy's' 9ther Red Soldiers have cut the charges at a news confer- i important supply road running from Saigon northward up the Me- kong's left bank to Vientiane, the administrative capital of the little jungle kingdom of Laos. They now are in i position to block all vital Mekong River traffic. The new Red offensive appeared aimed at tying down all possible in a prepared statement. He denied the I. W. W. charge saying, "that is tabe: I was never la member of the I. VV. W, I never "sub- intermediate valleys- Early morii-'scrjbes fully to the integrity and ing low clouds and fog, otherwise responsibility of Mr Murrow as a j French Union forces to prevent mostly sunny Thursday. April 7, 1954 Highest 70, Lowest 43 ONE YEAR AGO TODAY Highest 63, Lowest 43 broadcaster and as a loyal Amer-1 atV reinforcement ican." Phu- Murrow said McCarthy's "reck- less and unfounded attempt to im- pugn my loyalty is just one more 1 example of his typical tactic of -Wirnmy Cub attempting to tie up to Com- says this is a fine munistn anyone who disagrees day in his book, with him." take it or leave Outlets of CBS received heavy it, just as you response to the McCarthy pro- like. Sun is brighf gram. In New York almost 3000 as can a n d calls were "received within a few birds are about to' hours. CBS said 2012 favored Mur- sing theiv heads, row, and 977 McCarthy, off. In about three1 In other cities the response, as weeks now we reported by CBS, was as follows: will oe seeing all San Francisco: (KCBS) those lovely pos- Carthy 0, Murrow SO; KPIX-TV of Dien Bien 144, ies at the spring flower show of McCarthy 6. Murrow 69. the Horticullural society. I Los Angeles: McCarthy Jimmy says that next Tues- Murrow 949. day folks will go to the polls and, choose three councilmen from en men. They are all good men] and true, and James is going leu be interested :n the choice of the people. The three the L. Putnam, Mayor Hugh Folkins and Martin Van Diest, de-! serve a lot of thanks for their hard' LOS ANGELES report- Mrs. Gilbrefh Receives Honor CHICAGO Moller Gilbreth, 76, will be honored to- night as the "world's greatest wo- man A commission representing five engineering groups chose her for the profession's highest honor, the "Washington Mrs. Gilbreth, heroine of the book, "Cheaper by the is the first woman to receive the award. Ex- President Herbert Hoover won it when it was first presented in 1919. Reporter Easily Smuggles Mock A-Bomb Over Border "I had al- er for a Los Angeles was newspaper work. Arthur Godfrey says: "i naa ai- Eajd today it was "ridiculously ways heard that for seme people1 in show business there are only easv for hlm to 10 lm' two cities in the United Station "baby A-bombs" across the the Lockheed Aircraft plant in Burba nk, at the Los Angeles In- ternational airport, the Los Ange- les harbor and two and pow- er dams in this area. Hughes said the mock bombs, New York and Hollywood. I didn't Mexican brrder and plant them in .two feet long with a bore diameter believe it until one night I sav: California defense centers and three guys come out of the Stork thickly populated areas. club in New York to get into their Reporter Sid Hughes, of the Los of two inches, were on the back seat of his auto when he re-crossed the Mexican border into the United car and drive to Hottywood, where Angeles Mirror, said the mock, States at Tijuana. He said a cus- they lived. They started to pile bombs "at this moment" are hid-jtoms inspector didn't look at the in the front seat when, one chap cten at Hoover Dam on the Colo-.objects during a 48 second inspec- held back and said: "Let me sit on rado River, on San Francisco's tion but merely asked him where the outside, I get out first." i Golden Gate and Bay bridges, at. be was born. Meanwhile, two members of the House-Senate Atomic Energy Com- mittee, expressed similar skepti- cism about McCarthy's charge that H-bomb development was deliberately held up for 18 months, Friend of Mur raw Both Rep. Melvin Price (D-D1) and Rep. James E. Van Sandt (R-Pa) said if McCarthy has any evidence to support his charge he should be called before the con- gressional Atomic Committee to present it. On the subject of Murrow, Mr. Eisenhower was asked to comment generally on the radio and tele- vision commentator's loyalty and patriotism. The President said he had known Murrow for many years and con- sidered him a friend in the report- orial profession. Over the years, the President continued, patricularly during World War II in London, he al- ways thought of Murrow as a friend. Chairman W. Sterling Cole (R- NY) of the Atomic En> gy Com- mittee said that there was nothing necessarily "sinister" about what McCarthy described as an 18 months delay in research on the H-bomb. Comment Cole conceded that "we took a long time in deciding to go ahead with but said "that does not mean there was anything sinister In .Kansas City, Mo., former President Truman, who gave the go-ahead to build the H-bomb in 1950, said the order was issued "as soon as the scientists were ready to go to work." Mr. Truman had no comment on McCarthy's implication that work on the H-bomb may have been de- layed for IS months because of Communists in the, government. Air Nafl Guard Put On Ready To Go Basis The Air National Guard has been put on a "ready to go" basis and could get some of its air defense, squadrons into action against a threatened attack within 45 min- utes. Congress has been advised. The House Armed Services Com- mittee made public testimony to this effect as it began secret hear- ings on a new military construction program, much of ii Beared to a tighter continental de- tense against atomic attacks. The developments pointed up erowing official concern over how best to ward off a possible air assault on this country. President Eisenhower has said this isn't likely, but that Russian leaders could touch off war in a fit nf mad- ness or through miscalculations. Cobalt Bomb Can Be Made Says Dispatch 400 One Ton Bombs Coutd Annihilate Alt Life On Earth NEW YORK The most deadly weapon yet conceived by man which could annihilate all life on earth can now be made successfully, a dispatch in the New York Times said today. The cobalt bomb, a hydrogen bomb encased in a cobalt shell, passed from the realm of the theoretical during the recent hy- drogen blasts at the Eniwetok proving grounds in tbe Pacific, New York Times science writer William L. Lawrence said in a two-column story in the Times. The story said the explosion of a cobalt bomb would produce a radioactive cloud 320 times more powerful than radium. The cloud, carried by prevailing winds, could travel thousands of miles destroy- ing all life in its path. Path of Death a Prof. Harrison Brown, nuclear chemist at tbe California Institute ol Technology said if a cobalt bomb were set off 1000 miles west of California "the radioactive dust would reach California in about a day and New York in four or five days, killing most Itfe as it traverses the accord- ing to the newspaper. the Times quoted Brown, "the Western powers could explode hydrogen-cobalt bombs on a north-south line about the longi- tude of Prague ihat would destroy all life within a strips 1500 miles wide, extending from Leningrad to Odessa, and 3000 miles deep from Prague to the Ural "Such an attack would produce a 'scorched earth" 'unprecedented in Brown told the news- paper, Lifeless World The recent hydrogen tests at Eniwetok virtually proved that the cobalt bomb can be made by any power possessing the know- how of the 'hydrogen bomb. The cobalt bomb, simply stated, is a hydrogen bomb encased in cobalt instead of steel, Prof. Leo Szilard of the Univer- sity of Chicago told the Times that 400 one-ton cobalt bombs would release enough radioactvity ex tinguish all life on earth. EXPLOSIVE REMARKS President Dwight Ef sen dower, toft, and Lewis L, Stnuss, Atomic Energy Commission chairman, shown dur- ing a recent discussion on the H-Bomb, both -made headlines with statements on the bomb today. Mr. Strauss announced the third in tbe current series of hydrogen weapons tests in the Pacific had been carried out while Mr. Eisenhower ordered production of Atomic weapons increased. Won't Accept Mere Words At Geneva Says Eisenhower WASHINGTON (UP) Eisenhower said today tbe United States will go as far as prudence will allow in seeking a negotiated agreement with the Communists on Asia but will not accept mere words at the Geneva Conference. The chief executive told his news conference he could not say exactly what the United States will do in the Indo-China crisis or other Asian matters, because these things are being discussed now with the leaders of Congress and friends in the "free-world. Mr. Eisenhower said he knew his own convictions on what he would do, but until Congress and the Al- lies have reached an agreement it Bent on Seeks To Revive Feud With McCarthy NEW YORK Sen. William Benton (D-Cotic) has of- fered to give Sen. Joseph E, Mc- Carthy the names of 2000 witnes- ses who believe his charge of "fraud and deceit" against the Wisconsin Republican. On March 5 McCarthy withdrew a two million dollar libel and slan- der suit against Benton because his attorneys "could not find any- where in tbe United States anyone who would testify he believed any- thing- Benton had said." McCarthy sued Benton in 1952 after Benton had waived congres- sional immunity and charged Mc- Carthy with "practicing calculated fraud and deceit on the U, S. Sen- ate and on the people of the country." Benton said in a statement last night his office has been flooded with unsought and unrequited let- ters, telegrams and newspaper coupons and petitions from volun- teer witnesses. Tornadoes Stroke Midwest States By UNITED PRESS Two tornadoes struck today in Wisconsin and another was sighted in Michigan. The Weather Bureau issued nado warnings for Southern Mich- igan and Northern Ohio and Indi- ana. The twister breeding weather occurred, as a cold front bore down from the north. Strong winds swept the Dako- tas and a special cold wave -warn- ing was issued for north and west portions of Minnesota tonight. In Wisconsin, two tornadoes skipped across the southwestern section of the state, in Iowa Coun- ty. A farm woman was injured when a tree blew into her house. Damage to farm buildings was re- ported near Avoca, Highland and Dodgeville, Wis. Knight Signs Budget Into Law SACRAMENTO (UP) Gov. Goodwin J. Knight signed into law today the state bud- get bill which he said would "per- mit the state government to serve its 'people well and economically." The budget required no new or higher taxes even though it exceed- ed anticipated revenues by about 82 million dollars. The difference was made up by the use of surplus operating funds and by dipping in- to reserves. Knight signed the bill in the same form as it came from the Legislature although the total was about more than be ashed. The governor has the con- stitutional power to reduce or elimi- nate budget Items, Knight noted the legislature had added to his "strict economy" bud- get a two million dollar item for a loan to Los Angeles County for establishment of a small boat har- bor and recreation area at Play a Del Rey, "In this Knight said, "the proposal is merely for an ad- vance of state funds so tbe proj- ect may be begun and qualified for federal participation. "I also understand that the pro posal is for a self-sustaining proj- ect which in the long run will not require permanent expenditure of slate and local tax funds." Knight said also that a appopriaiion to match local funds.. for construction of a sea wall to remedy serious damage at Redon- do Beach was approved "with the understanding that this wilt afford a permanent remedy and the local units of government will bear all future expense of maintenance and repair." would stultify the negotiations now going on to try to establish the course of action to be taken. Decisions to In a lengthy discussion of the Far Eastern situation, Mr, Eisen- hower repeated that the conse- quences of Russian domination of the area would be incalculable to the free world. Time after time he insisted that impossible to say what fu- ture actions Might be taken. He said it is a matter which must not be handled by one nation alone but calls for concerted decisions. Secretary of State John Foster Dulles meanwhile called for free- dom loving nations to express a "united will" to keep the Commu- nists from dominating Southeast Asia. Dulles told the Republican Wo- men's Centennial Conference here that the Indo-China and Southeast Asia area is extremely important, Confident of Peace Dulles said the U.S. purpose is not to get into a war but to keep out of a war. He said he is confi- dent and hoijeful of success. j The new discussions by Dulles and Mr, Eisenhower came amid signs that neither Britain nor France is in any great rush to join in a general warning to Red China against intervention in In- do-China. Speaking slowly and clearly to emphasize his remarks, the Presi- dent expressed confidence that the United States as a whole, Congress and the executive branch, are ready to move just as far as prudence will allow to reach an agreement on Asiatic problems. Some Democratic senators sug- gested yesterday in Senate debate on the Indo-China situation that Mr. Eisenhower should report per- sonally to Congress on the Far East crisis. The idea was put forward by Sen. Henry M, Jackson (D- Wash) and was endorsed promptly by Sen. J. William Fulbright (D- a member of the Senate For- eign Relations committee. But the suggestion was not touched on at Mr. Eisenhower's news conference. 12 Policemen, 10 Students Injured In Egypt Cftish ALEXANDRIA, Egypt (UP) Twelve policemen and 10 students were injured yesterday when po- lice put down a student demon- stration against ttie Revolutionary Council. Police said 41 students were ar- rested., The clash took place on the Alexandria University campus. Employment Picture Looks Encouraging Says President WASHINGTON. Eisenhower reported today the un- employment cycle shows very def- signs of flattening out He also told his news conference he finds other day-to-day sources of encouragement in the economic picture. Government economists said rec- ord high new construction so far this year was the most favorable economic sign since the business decline started last summer. The government reported last night that'new construction expen- ditures rose to a record NEWSPAPJEJR! 000 for the first three months of this year, about 100 millions more than for the same period in boom 1953. Mr. Eisenhower said that while the American economy is'not a static thing, he finds .encourage- ment in March employment 'and unemployment figures. Tptal employment rose in March. Unemployment increased by about the same figure, th'us ap- pearing to cancel each other. These figures, the President said, reflect a very definite flattening out of the curve in unemployment, Provides Data Of Great Import Says Strauss Eisenhower Orders Increased Production Of Atomic Weapons WASHINGTON (UP) Chair- man Le-vit L. Streuti of the Atomic Energy Commission dis- closed today President Eis- enhower his ordered "greatly increased production" of atomic weapons, including H-bombs. WASHINGTON Atom- ic Energy Commission announced today that it has "successfully car- ried out" the third in its current series of hydrogen weapons tests in the Pacific. The announcement said the ex- plosion was set off yesterday at the AEC's Eniwetok-Bikini proving ground in the Marshall Islands. It produced "information of great importance to national de- AEC Chairman Lewis L. Strauss said. The announcement came shortly after President Eisenhower said at bis weekly news conference that tbe United States is making H- bombs about as big as it intends to. The President said he knows of no reason to make the superbomb, already capable of knocking out a metropolis, any bigger than it is. The inference is that ic the pres- ent tests the AEC is sticking not more powerful weapons but more efficient end more deliverable ones. Yesterday's explosion brought to at least 57 the number of nuclear blasts since the birth of atomic weaponeering nine years ago. The AEC's brief announcement did not say it was a thermonuclear [hydrogen) explosion. But Strauss >n his White House statement a week ago referred to the experi- mental program as "a test series of thermonuclear weapons." Congressional sources said the first of the series, detonated March 1, liberated violence comparable to 12 to 14 million tons of TNT. No reliable estimates have been made public of the power of the second shot on March 26. Some congressional sources said it was smaller than the first one, others said it was larger, Three Killed As Hits Truck, Two Other Wanes GEORGE AFB, Calif. Air Force Sarbe jet veered out of control moments after takeoff yes- terday, killing three men, damag- ing ;i truck and two other planes and seriously burning five men. The jet fighter crashed while taking off for its home base, Ham- ilton Atr Force Base, Calif. Officials identified the dead as 2nd Lt. Joseph D. Young, 22, the pilot, Oklahoma City; T.Sgt. James C. Flower, Victorville, Calif., and Flagler Beach, Fla., and Carl Case, a civilian assistant fire chief, Big Bear, Calif. Flower and Case were assigned to a crash-rescue truck which the plane struck before crashing into a T33 jet trainer and a 329 bomber. The bomber was reported undam- aged. The, injured men, who bad been working on the trainer and the bomber, were treated for serious burns at tbe base bospital. Russ Questioned Kidnaped Gl's About A-Bomb FULDA, Germany U. S. soldiers kidnaped and held over- night by Bus si an "invaders" said today their Soviet captors quest- ioned them aboil t the atomic bomb before setting them free. Sgt William J. Young. 22, Ro- chester Mills, Pa., and Pvt. Luther G. Woods, 27, Winona, W. Va., said tbe Reds also tried to per- euade them to stay ID Soviet Ger- many "or take a nice trip to Moscow." Young and Woods ware by five heavily arnwd Russians on tbe Iron Curtain border near here Monday and held hours. Eisenhower Ploys Golf WASHINGTON (UP) President Eisenhower went to the Butjiing Tree dub today for lunch and a round of golf,   

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