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   Progress-Bulletin (Newspaper) - August 2, 1970, Pomona, California                               MAIL PQrMONA, CAUF.. SUNDAY MORNING, AUGUST 2, 197O vc Copy Drug Con! 01 Emphasized in GOP Platform SACRAMENTO (AP> California crafted an election-year phtfcrn: Saiurtay tha; outs spec.-! err.phaiU on of the drag and rarcot- 10 Sections ;02 srr-jv- on s- The o -h- cf p.es Tr-- an., hii-oreo? o" other JRe- n.r. on Us plank- are nature. Acbpc.or: o! :be program. with Htile or no debtte fcrowej a day-long meeting of about 100 GOP of- :sceholders ar.d parry candidates. The crime and law enforcement committee came a special plank on the drug prab'em, calling :or elimination "of this epidemic which has caused hjrnan misery and criminal activity." The ecucai.on and youth ar.d health committee also called for attacks or. the drug problem, includ- ing humanitarian treatment for addicts and stri- nsen: penalties for drag puihers. There was a minor fuss m the platform committee -.paring over whether the agriculture p-ank should for a phasing out of federal agricultural sub- sidies. Such an idea was proposed by Rep. John Roasse- !ct, a member of the John Birch Society. Assemblyman Ketchum. R-Paso Robies. chairman of the agricuitural plank committee, said. "I resist that. That's your job." Ke'.chum added tha: sf Republicans were going to oppose subsidies, :hey should do it in every" plank, r.o: just in field of agriculture. Tropical Storm Now Hurricane ORLEANS the season's third tropical turned into a hurricane Saturdav and headed northwestward through the Gulf of Me- xico w.th winds measured at 75 mites an hour. The hurricane was 410 miles south of Pensacola, P.a.. and was moving toward the northwest at 10 to 12 miles an hour. is a very small hurricane with highest winds 75 miles per hour near the center and gales extend out 100 miles to the north and east of the an from the New Orleans Weather Bureau said. Celia began as a tropical depression Fridav night when it raked western Cuba heavy rains. Once it reached warm gulf waters the depression Quickly grew a tropical storm. The Weather Bureau warned persons along the northern and Tvestern Gulf of Mexico to be prepared for farther developments. The iatest plotting showed Celia to be near a lati- tude 24.5 north and longitude 87.4 west. The leather Bureau said Celia should move to- wards ihe corthrrest at 10 to 12 miles an nour through :he cay with a slow increase in size and expected. Kidnapers Free LA. Woman LOS ANGELES wife of a manufac- turing firm executive was kidnaped and released unharmed 19 hours later her abductors received in ransom, pohce disclosed Satur- day night. Mrs. Roberta Ziegler, 47. told police she was kid- naped at gur.pomt shortly after a.m. Saturday by two men and a woman. She said they used a rose to get into the ZagSers" home in the Rancho Park District of Wes: Los Ang- eles. PoHce saw a woman and a man pick up the ran- som money left at an undisclosed location by Mrs. Ziegier's husband, Paul, 43. At the same nine. Mrs. Z-egler was released and drove herself home in the couple s 1969 model automobile, which was taken by the kidnapers. Officers reported a rcan and a woman were taken Into custody as suspects in the case and :he ransom rr.cr.ey was recovered. Police would not identify ihe suspects immediately or revea! how they were ar- rested. Russ Send Peace Note Kosygin Message Sfresses Cooperation Among Powers PROBLEMS Louis Zemel. co-owner of the Powder Ridge ski area in iliddlefieid. Conn., shouts instructions Saturday. State police say the 20.000 youths attending the ban ned festival at Powder Ridge are "Zernel's problem." Hundreds at Rock Fetes Treated for 'Bad Trips' The Weather The Pomona Valley wii have variable high cloud- iness o." Sunday and Monday. Otherwise, weather v.ili ccnnnue to be sunny and warm. The Sun- cay 97 and r'ne :ow 64. The br-gh Monday wili be 100 Temperatures wjj! continue ro be a'oou; 5 -o 10 degrees above normal through midweek. JN TODAY'S P-B Classified Ads Classified Ads Crossword Puzzle Dateline Jeaae Dison Editorial Entertainment Financial >hisic, Drama, Art Obituary Estate Science For You Sports Women World of Animals By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Hundreds of young people were treated for "bad trips" from drugs Saturday at the sites of two major rock music festi- vals, court-banned concert a: Middiefield, Conn. The doctor in charge of medi- cal treatment of the young peo- ple at Middiefieid expressed alarm that a health crisis might ensue because of heavy drag use. An estimated yoar.g persons gathered this week at the site, even though a court or- der prevented any music. And at Wadena, Iowa, an esti- mated 100 persons had been treated for drug effects by Sat- urday morning at the site cf a rock festival which, although banned by health officials, pro- ceeded under a court order. Meanwhile, youths also showed up en masse at Aix-En- Provence, France, even though the had banned the scneduled rock fest'vei. The promoters decided ?o proceed, ca'.bng it a -prolonged concert" instead of a rock festival. "Whatever it calls itself." said the mayor, ''this gathering of persons remains bar.ned." And a rock festival was m its second day Saturday at Man- seau. Quebec. The mussc went into the early morning hours Saturday. Although hundreds of young people were reported to have left the Powder Ridge area site of the "festival'" Saturday, thousands of youths remained. Dr. Wjijiam Abruzzj. the festival med'cal director, said the crowd was getting bored wuhout music and drags were being used because the young people had "nothing else to do." He said his medical team had treated "almost a thousard bad "That's more 'nan we had at 75 Bodies Found as Boat Sinks SAN JUAN" P.R. (APi An ferryboat carrvir.a an estimated 250 persons sank Saturday in the shark infested narrows between St. Kitts and Nevis Islands. Reports from St. Kitts said 50 survivors and 75 bodies has been recovered. A massive rescue armada of police launches, small boats, helicopters U.S. Navy and Coast Guard and even a sub- marine were engaged in rescue operations some 200 miies east of San Juan. Woodstock with said Abruzzi, who was medical director at the Woodstock festi- val iast year in Bethel. N.Y. A crowd estimated at "more than 30.000" vibrated to the electric rock music at Wadena. Several of the persons treated for drag effects were trans- ferred to a hospital in Oeiwein, some 25 miles to the southeast. "The drugs are flowing rke popcorn." said Favette Ccur.rv Atty. vValier Saur. "But there j'ist the manpower to ccpe with K. "Anybody wants make a cit-zen's arrest can be our sasd Saur, on: "anybody who goes -nro that compound and comes out alive would be lucky." Highway patrolmen and local officers have cordoned off the area, but few actually have set foot on the ha.. Held. The festival site as a 220-acre Kjtyfieid overlooking a river val- ley. Judge E.B. Shaw of Iowa's County District Court cleared the Tvay for the festrvp! by ordering the county board of superv-isors to make an excep- tion :n health and saferv re- quiremerits. The event, organ- ized by Sound Storm Isc. of Chi- cago, began Friday night as young r-eople danced, shouted, sang and clapped. Saboteurs Disturb Shaky Irish Peace BELFAST, Northern Ireland (APi Saboteurs tried to burn down a Belfast department store and crowds attempted to erect new barricades isrday. a jru'ky Deacs imposed by Br'iish Shoppers were hustled ou'side when an incendiary device touched oft a blaze in the store. but damage was shcht there were no A of 50 formed Saturdav :n the area a was b; troops Fr.dav They ar.d farces anci a'.iL-mrited -o erect a cace before 100 re- stored crce1" b% several carriers of tear ga-. There were no Earlier, tie British army used water cannon, tear and nausea gas against Roman Catholic street gangs armed with bows ar.d arrows rampaging through Belfast for the- second straight Bnt.sh authorities banned troops from our on Belfast streets alone following threats of mergence for the shooting death of Daniel 0 Hagan. 19. More than 300 rioters battled zrcops untii near dawn to avenge the -death of O'Hasar. s'-c: he allegsdiy threw bombs at troops dunng -r.e- lee triggered by the arres: of youths who were freed Two Murder Suspects Get Married COLORADO SPRINGS. Colo. man waited in connection with Ca-iforaia.s "candlelight Robert Wlllard Libe-y. nas married a woman who :s also inspected in one of the murders, authorities said Saturday. The COubife-ring ceremony took piace at the El Paso County counhouse. Lifaerrv. 23. exchanged vows with Miss Kendaii Ann Bieriey. 24. of Eugene, Ore. The couple was arrested in Colorado Spnugs June 10 on charges of kidnaping, armed robbery and theft. They have been fighting extradition to California ever since. Disc. Judge John Gailager performed the rites and Liber- ty's best man was public James Bertagnolli. A fellow inmate. Mrs. Dori Doll, was the matron of honor. Other members of the wedding party included the sheriff and several depuues. The r.vo are suspects :n ;he murder of Robert Iron, 52. of San Diego. Cahf.. June 6. "Tie candiehght kCer strikes aaain'' was scraped across :r.e dead man's authorities of Los Angeles, is suspected :n the March 12 death of a former roommate, Thomas Astronra. 25. of Hun- Beach. The newrv-aeds were sent back to separate celis of the Ei Paso County after the ceremorv. MOSCOW I'PI) X Xosyi.n Saturdav u rr.ei-age of peac- ;o President Nixon. French Pres- ident Georges Pomp.dou and Britbh Fr.me Minister Edward Heath. Telegram, a mes- sage r.oting the Aus. 2 of ;he 1915 pot- scam accord 'r. the Allied Powers laid ;he oasis for postwar peace, contained glow- ing phrases stressing the of cooperation be- tweer. -he Communis: and r.on- Corr.muris: worids. "The Pnjsdirn dec.-ions :on- showed :hat stares w-th Cifferer.i social systems can come to muiua-lv accepta- ble agreements on :he "oiggesr ar.d cornplev interaational prob.'ems in :he name of peace and secunrv...'' Kosvsin said. "Just as 3 quarter century ago, we proceed from the view that when there is a growing mutual understanding and ;oo- of states and peoples, darabie and lasting peace can be ersured." telegram also re- :he ng soviet '.si! "or an securi- ty ccir -recce to settle disputes 5j.ll o-jtstandisg from World '.Var 11. There were also several comments that reflected So- viets interests :n the current negotiations with West Germa- ny for a non aggression pac'.. "The implementation of the Potsdam principles means, in our time, recognition of- the invjolabUity of the present Euroaean frontiers, recognition of :he poLtica! realities thar formed as a resul: of the Second World War and the postwar development and er- sararce of reliable sectm'ry ia earope." said. Noting that the World %rar ir Allies strove to crush '-'Gennar. miritarisni and he added: "At the same time, they stressed their intention to en- able the German people to rec- struct their life on a peaceful basis and in time assume a plact Siijong the free and peace- ful peoples of the He'll Sell His Blood For a Year DETROIT 34-ysar- old assembly line worker -will begin a new career next week selim5 his rare blood at a quart for a income, the Detroit News reported in its eariy Suadav editions. In a copyrighted story, the N'ews said Joe Thomas, who has rhe nation's highest known concentration of a rare blood antibody called ami-Lewis B, nas signed a contract with a national bsoiog-cai supply firm after six months of negotia- tions. Anti-Lewis B is a blood protein which has major uses in tracking dowii bad reactions to blood transfusions and in human genetics research, the News said in a story by staff writer Stephen Cain. "it's hard to believe." Thomas was quoted as saying. "You're an average workicg man making a living sad then someone tells you you can lie someone tells yon you can lie down for a few hours, give some blood and make a year. "But I've signed the contract, so T guess u's Thomas said. "I appreciate the money bui I really like the idea of the blood being used rather than misused. I've been helped by a lot of people in rny life but I've never been in a position to help too many other people." According to the Thomas' signing of rhe contract with a of American Hospital Suppiv Co.. Dace. Fla.. ends a race between a Red oifiC'al ar.d 's for Thorr.aj" blood. Dr. Frar.k Ellis, r.ow head of the Southeast Michigan Cross Wood prograjs, spotted the antibody during a test of Thomas' blood seven years age at Wayne County General Hospital. "Joe's was the best anti- Lewis 3 serum to show UD in 28 Ellis said. Thomas earned some raoney for 10 or more donations but stopped going because the procedure was uncomfortable and the travel inconvenient. The news story said the national supply of the antibody was exhausted after two vears and professional biood procu- rers began a hunt for Tfcomas that including hiring private detectives and possible pirating of Red Cross lists of rare donors. Cain said Ellis was unable to pay Thomas for his biood because of the Red Cross' tax exempt status precluded buying blood for resale. So Ellis set np a plan in the last eight months to sell directly to a national biological supply firm, and avoid middlemen. Then Thomas was located at Chrysler Corp. through his social security number and re- tested Sampies of his blood were mailed to five iirins with invitations for bids. The first shipment wii! be shspped next week, the News said, after Thomas began procedure at a Jocai hospital that will let him safely a quart of plasma every week indefinitely. The company bid about a quart for Thomas's bicods and estimated i; would want about worth during rhe vear. Although Leader on Trial for Murder Manson 'Family' Still at Ranch LOS ANGELES AP) irles continue to i.ve caics and o .-f Spahn rnov.e ranch, cbo..; nines from downtown Los An- geies we runs. haven't perky, pre'ty lit- tle S-antira Good, one OE a cozen onginal members stsii at the dilapidated rr.'-ch. But bearded Rora.d Hughes, a defense lawyer at !ne tna! of Manson rnd three other ;irl lii-cipijs in me Sharon Tn-e. miirners of last Augiis', said ihe saucr has aftected the r.fe-stvle of tr.5 family lesal iir'.eh: ir.tmded. Hjghts said th-e family is :n behalf of the defense, running errands and the like, and hover- syrripatheticaliy outride the eight-floor trial coutroom of the Los Angeles Rail of Justice. On trial with Manson, 35, are Atkins. 21. Pavncia Kren- v.nkle, 22. and Lslie Van Hou- ten. 20. They are accused coilec- tivelv or of the Aug. o. 1963, slayings of Miss Tate. r.racnant blonde movie star, and four visitors at her Benedict Carvr.n mar.s.or-, as 2s kilhncs 24 hour? of wealthy rood rarket Ler.o ina hii The tnal Monday. The of the Msnson commune at the Spahn rar.cn was descnbed ir. detaii Issi week by 21. and pig-tailed. Her defection from fanriy rar.ks ro accept iin- munity and testify for the state has drawn glowering glances from the four defendants. Mrs. Kas-abian testified that members of the commune de- parted the mam ranch area at intervals for nearby camping rherr. GLHS toag.es ar.d parts, 'oo s, ic.; tsrsis. cook r.g and scavenged rood. The buggies arnieti and equipped. Mrs. Kas- said, for ar ever.ti.al exo- dbs irro the deseri ir. advance cf a which Manson envisioned. There were commu- na; orgies. Mrs. Ka.sabsjn faeu. and the garls %ere c-.rected by Manson to 'jse their bodies to recruit male visitors ;nto family. When new giris were needed, the witness said. Mart- son left the ranch m of them. Manser; sr.d his fner.as carne :o the ranch .r, the Sac c-o Vaiiej .n Aprii :9es. "Charhe and rr.encs came :o spend the and never ?eerned to said the owner, bund cowboy George Spahn. ?0. The garbage rans that bkmde 5anJy C-ood referred ;o were to the rear oi Los es and" restaurants, in search of edible castoifs. Meat not a fa- vorea item, even if obtainable. Bro-An rice, sa'ad. cooked vegetables, car.dy and tee cream were. Cash as needed was obtained (See A2, Col. .'SPAPERf   

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