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Mountain Democrat Newspaper Archive: December 28, 2000 - Page 2

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   Mountain Democrat (Newspaper) - December 28, 2000, Placerville, California                               A-2 MinttinDw Thurwtay, M, 3000 Hoard over the back fence Happy New Year to everyone. 1 hope you keep 16 percent of your New Year's resolutions. Monika is working on the second page of my New Year's resolutions, but I haven't seen the list... yet. '-Free drinks: When 1 arrived at the Mountain Democrat's Christmas party at the Cold Springs Country Club, I ordered a gin and tonic for Monika and me. I was informed that Walter J. Miller had prepaid our drinks earlier in the afternoon. Thanks, Walt. Happy New Year. -I Thank you, El Dorado County Citizens: The CASA Christmas trees had 902 ornaments. Each ornament represented a needy child and their wish list for Christmas. Each and every ornament was picked up by generous people in our community. If you include the ornaments in the South Lake Tahoe area, approximately children had a terrific Christmas thank you. Bill, put me on the injury list during an alleged "friendly" tennis match. Now I hear he has done the same thing to Mike Hanford. I need to talk to Gary Lacy regarding assault charges. you, City of Placerville: The annual "pick up the leaves" program is operating, and I appreciate the fact that some- one picked up my six bags of leaves. Tfie annual pickup program is appreciated. The "Coffeebreak" newsletter reports the following: "I figure I've been a successful parent if my children grow up and are able to afford their own psychoanalysis." Students who excel: Shawna Copcland, a 1993 graduate of El Dorado High School, has graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Commercial Recreation Management. She attended California State University, Sacramento. Congratulations, Shawna nice way to end the Year 2000. The annual edition of Who's Who among American High School Students has been released. Student nominations are made by edu- cation organizations, churches, national youth groups, guidance counselors, and high school principals, "based upon student's aca- demic achievements and involvement in extra curricular activi- ties." The following students appear in the latest edition: Brittani Axtell, Robin Bliss-Wagner, Chelsea Casbarro, Brittney Cicchetti, Michael D. Crippen, Kimberly Depue, Denis Dolcini, Anne Eklund, Lauren P. Ferrell, Jennifer A. Fisher, Annya Bird, James Blodgett, Alycia C. Cauill, Chase P. Clanton, Christopher A. Daniels, Heather Diers, Erin J. x Dryburgh, Kristian M. Engblom, Brian E. Fetrow, and Veronica R. Hagge. John Chapman, Placerville, believes some Florida missing bal- lots are on 'he space shuttle, but it will be a few months before jthey are available. John also reports our local doughnuts are better jthan "Krispy Kream" doughnuts Buy locally! j If Maryellen Ware points her finger at you, try not to faint. She tried to chop off the end of her finger, and it is scary look- Maryellen, we hope you heal quickly for your sake and Were you aware that Cameron Park Lion member Don Acrea 30 years of perfect attendance at Lion Club meetings? His Xfavorite movie is "Finding My Way Home" from all those Lion CClub meetings. ?i Dewey Ware's favorite movie is "Blazing and he to eat beans, too. Darrell Britt's favorite movie is "Once Upon a Time in the West." Darrell assures me this is not a movie about his love life. Dave "Doc" Wiser has the Christmas spirit all year long. Davey famous for providing free stagecoach rides for various activities ;.on a year-round basis. Barbara and Tom Tankersley, owners of i the Iron Works Gallery, approached the downtown merchants and i the Chamber of Commerce. Donations were provided to cover the cost of a beautiful stagecoach on display at the Iron jWorks Gallery. Barbara and Tom made no profit on the stagecoach were happy to donate their labor for Davey. On Dec. 16, the was presented to Davey during an emotional ceremo- no dry eyes for this presentation. Thank you, Davey, for of hours of community service. Dave Roman took me to a Wal-Mart management meeting in iFolsom. Wal-Mart personnel presented checks to P.R.I.D.E. and Joy, Stars in Retirement, S.P.E.A.R., Suicide Prevention Education 'and Action Resources, and Relay for Life. Over was donat- to the agencies. Corene Johnson, Personnel Manger, informs that the Folsom Wal-Mart store contributed over to various nonprofit agencies this year. Thank you, Wal-Mart. v Exercise programs need to be creative to keep people interested. Karen Tucker informs me the Christian Aerobic classes will start the week of Jan. 8. This is a fitness program for women choreo- i graphed to contemporary Christian music. For more information, call Karen at 677-5967. At times I have certainly felt like the old rugged cross after an exercise session. Overheard at Durango's bar "He had a whole lot of money 2 or 3 marriages ago." By Curtis Taylor An American minute Second-Placers Three obscure Presidents, John Quincy Adams, Rutherford Hayes, and Benjamin Harrison, performed a feat that no other president before them had done. We now know that their remark- able accomplishment, of course, was not so remarkable. In America, we believe in majority rule. The candidate that gets the most votes wins. Even great men, like Washington and Lincoln had to get more votes than their opponents to win. But this didn't happen with Adams, Hayes, and Harrison. Each of them came in second. As did a more recent second- placer George W. Bush. In America, presidents are elected not by the people, but by the electoral college. And; as we all now know, the electoral col- lege ignored the men who came in first in these elections and elected those who really came in second. Perhaps all this proves one of Ronald Reagan's observations. he said, "is supposed to be the second oldest profes- sion, but it bears a very close resemblance to the first." Kinkade makes pledge By HEATHER LAKE Staff writer Plans to build a million. Marble Valley Regional Center for the Arts has received a gener- ous incentive from the Thomas Kinkade Foundation that will make a big difference in when the dream is realized. The Kinkade Foundation has pledged for every million raised in the capital fund drive that is set to begin in January. The offer apparently comes with no strings attached. Robert Caulk, executive director of MVRCA said they are consider- ing a Thomas Kinkade museum but that idea is not connected to the grant offer by the Kinkade Foundation. Caulk said that Kinkade has been a supporter of the project for many years. "He is very excited about it and wants to see it he said of Kinkade's pledge. Plans for the center have been in the works for twenty years and the original architectural plan is going to be updated and revised in an effort to make the center even more unique. Set to be located oh 20 acres of land donated by the S.H. Cowell Foundation south of Bass Lake road there are ideas in the works for a children's arts academy that could put the center on the map. "A clarinet in every mouth that's my said Caulk of his vision for developing the artistic talents of the county's youth. He said there has been on- going dialogue with regional school districts about the poten- tial for such a program. The plans for the facility include a theater, an arts com- plex and meeting rooms for use by area businesses and corpora- tions and classroom space. Once known as the Sierra Cultural Arts Foundation the Marble Valley Regional Center for the Arts holds various fund raising events throughout the year including the annual Butterfly Concert that is held on the first Sunday after Labor Day each year. 'The MVRCA is launching a "capital campaign" during which it will be reaching out to major organizations in the Greater Sacramento Area for financial contributions so construction can begin. The organization needs about million dollars more to break ground. Caulk is optimistic that it could happen as soon as 18 months from now and said he expects construction will take about two years. Individuals interested in mak- ing a donation can call 676- 6400. Heather Lake's e-mail is Teen spends holidays in jail By MEGAN MARSHACK Staff writer Kyle Eli Harbuck, 19, is spending the holidays in the orange uniform of El Dorado County Jail inmates, just the way his mother, Margaret, did last year. Eli Harbuck pleaded no con- test Oct. 16 to a felony charge he possessed methamphetamine for sale. Sheriff's detective Gary Parker was working uniform patrol around noon Oct. 8 when he spotted Harbuck illegally walking along Highway 50 at. Cedar Grove, apparently trying to hitch a ride. Harbuck asked Parker for a lift. Before the teen was allowed in the patrol car, Parker patted him down and discov- ered a container with what Harbuck said was marijuana. When asked, Harbuck denied he had any more. But when Parker began searching Harbuck's backpack, the detective said Harbuck became "extremely finally admitting there was "a lot of crank in the accord- ing to Parker. Politicians endorse Osborne Nursing bill passes WASHINGTON, D.C. Calling the final passage of a five- year, billion provider relief bill "an important step forward towards meeting the goal of strengthening our nation's skilled nursing care the American Health Care Association praised California Congressman Bill Thomas for ensuring the long- awaited bill passed this year. "We've spoken frequently this year about the need to keep the promise of accessible, quality skilled nursing care to California's most vulnerable seniors, and this legislation helps address this important national stat- ed Charles H. Roadman 11, M.D., AHCA. Dr. Roadman said the fact that action was taken prior to adjourn- ment illustrated how important Congress thinks it is to address the unintended consequences associat- ed with the 1997 Balanced Budget Act. "The unexpectedly large reduc- tions in Medicare funding caused The backpack contained a total of 2.84 ounces of metham- phetamine in rock form; indi- vidually packaged with the largest just over an ounce and the smallest weighing in at .120 ounces. Harbuck was being held on bail before his plea. He could have faced three years in state prison, if convict- ed after a jury trial. Instead he was sentenced to 240 days in the county jail, ordered to register as a nar- cotics offender and attend drug counseling. Harbuck's mother, now 41, was sentenced to 10 months in the county jail on Oct. 22, 1999 with the last three months at a residential drug program. Margaret Harbuck pled to one count of transporting metham- phetamine May 23, 1998 near Quinette. She also pled to one count of failing to appear for court after she vanished during her Sept. 1999 trial. Superior Court Judge Eddie T. Keller continued the trial in absentia and the jury dead- locked on the felony counts of transportation and possession of methamphetamine for sale. I Georgia Peach Coming to Town: Proud grandparents Gene and Mary Gillihan and Don and Birtie Costa have a special Christmas 'present this year. New granddaughter Erin Grace Gillihan was born on Nov. 13. Proud mom and dad, Chad and Nancy Gillihan are bringing Erin to Placerville from Rome, Ga. where Chad is sta- tioned with the U.S. Marines, for the holidays. Congratulations to the entire family and I hope you spoil her rotten. James Tidwell recently resigned from CASA board of directors. James recently received a substantial promotion with his company J and will be traveling extensively. The CASA board will miss James. i He has been a hard-working, creative board member, who took on large projects. Good luck, James. V By JACK CARREROW Staff writer Senator Rico Oiler and Assemblyman of the 4th District, Tim Leslie, have thrown in their support to George Osborne for the El Dorado Irrigation District board of directors scat that is now held by Bill Bcrgmcister who faces a recall election on Jan. 9. Calling Osborne "fair and independent in his dealings with Oiler says that Osborne will bring stability and balance to the problems that face the BID board. .by the 1997 BBA clearly hurt patients and the providers who serve he stated. "The restorations made in the final leg-! islative agreement were not just necessary, but absolutely essential to maintaining the economic via- bility of America's skilled nursing care provider-base." The AHCA president and CEO' noted that passage of the bill demonstrated a conscious need on the part of Congress and the Administration to fine-tune the! 1997 BBA. "We look forward to working with the next Congress and Administration to create more permanent solutions to improving; Medicare, and to work coopera- tively with Congressman Thomas 'on the many health care priorities' awaiting our collective Dr. Roadman concluded. The Positive Mace For Kids Ages 7-18 295-8019 344-0208 Western Slope A Boys Girls Club iqnature Theatres jm.f Ji-m. A-J State-of-the-Art Cinema SIGNATURE PLACERVILLE 8 ShpyMimes Good For Wedrtesddy 12-27-00 thru Thursday 12-28-00 ___626-7800 TOM HANKS, HELEN HUNT CASTAWAY DAILY: (PG-13) NO PASSES MISS CONGENIALITY SANDRA BULLOCK, BENJAMIN 8RATT (PG-13) NO PASSES DAILY: WHAT WOMEN WANT MEL GIBSON, HELEN HUNT (PG-13) NO PASSES DAILY: VERTICAL LIMIT CHRISTOPHER O'DONNELL (PG-13) NO PASSES DAILY: DUDE, WHERE'S MY CAR ASHTON KUTCHER, SEANN WILLIAM SCOTT (PG-13) NO PASSES DAILY: FAMILY MAN NICOLAS CAGE, TEA LEONI (PG-13) NO PASSES DAILY: WES CRAVEN'S DRACULA 2000 OMAR EPPS, JERI RYAN (R) NO PASSES DAILY: THE EMPEROR'S NEW GROOVE DISNEY ANIMATED (G) NO PASSES DAILY: DR SEUSS'HOW THE GRINCH STOLE CHRISTMAS JIM CARREY (PG) PASSES OK DAILY: ViiHUiAi www.iisiniiurtmeiiretcom V ATTENTION SENIOR CITIZENS If you are losing your HMO by the end of December 2000, or you pay more than a month on your current Medicare supplement, please give us a call. We have an excellent plan for you and you can save up to 50% on your premium and give you 100% coverage along with the freedom to choose physicians and hospitals anywhere In the USA. Remember, all Medicare supple- ment plans are regulated by the government but each Insurance company has a different premium rate. Please Call 1-1800) 750-2494 for more information jflountain Bemotrat Assemblyman Leslie says that he has no doubts that Osborne will be an effective member of the E1D board and will "provide valuable service to the district's water users." Osborne, of Camino, is a California Department of Forestry Unit Chief who is look- ing to bring "logic and common sense" to what many say is an embattled board of directors. Bcrgmcister was elected to the board a year ago and now faces a recall election after the collec- tion of over signatures of his constituents in the Division 1 area that he serves. MISSED DELIVERY? If your Mountain Democrat is delivered by motor route carrier and you have not received your paper by a.m., call our circulation department, (530) 62M255 before a.'m: and your paper will be delivered no later than 2 p.m. Toll Free (888) 622-1255 lor El Dorado Hills area. If your Mountain Democrat is delivered by postal carrier and you do not receive your paper, call the circulation department at (530) 622-1255 and arrangements will be made for your paper to be delivered. VACATION If you would like your delivery temporarily put on hold, call our office AT LEAST two (2) business days prior to the fiist day to be stopped. If it is during a holiday, call 3 days ahead. Let us know when you want it stopped and when to restart so we can make the necessary adjustments in a timely manner. REWARD For information leading to the arrest and conviction of for theft or vandalism oi Mountain Democrat papers, tubes, or vending machines. MOUNTAIN DEMOCRAT (ISSN 0745-7677) Published Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday for per year (includes applicable tax) in El Dorado County (other rales available upon request) by Mother Lode Printing and Publish ng Co., Inc., 1360 Broadway, Placerville, CA 95667. Periodical Postage Paid at Placerville, CA. Post Master: Send address changes to the Mountain Democrat. P. 0. Box 1088, Placerville, C A 95667 Inside Classified ads......................................B-6 Comics...........................................B-7 Editorial..........................................A-4 Foothill Lift.......................................A-6 Horot Letters...........................................A-5 Logbook..........................................A-5 Public NotteM....................................B-10   

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