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Star News Newspaper Archive: April 21, 1964 - Page 15

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   Star-News (Newspaper) - April 21, 1964, Pasadena, California                               Look Angels Open Home Slafe vs. By FLOYD.SCHNEIDERMANN The Angels' light cavalry charges home tonight with some new artillery. The Angels, open their 1964 home season against the Detroit Tigers, in an 8 o'clock game at' Chavez Ravine. And the Tigers will be the first to affirm (hat the Angels have hauled in some heavier guns for this campaign. Bobby Knoop, a pleasant enough young man otherwise, chilled the Tig- ers with two homers in last week's series in Tiger Stadium and Is-bidding to erase the question mark from behind his hitting that the Angel manage- ment said' was the only doubt about his becoming the regular Angel second baseman. Joe Adcock, installed at (Irst base In the opening road trip, also has been delivering solid 'hitting, a spectacular break-in on opening day with .three hits. It would appear that the light Angel attack has been beefed up considerably. As for the cavalry part, man- ager Bill Klgney feels he has greatly Improved his team de- fense with the line fielding of Knoop as second base, which has enabled him to also plug a pesky hole at third base by Ail-Star second baseman Bill Mo ran there. Then he has added Dick Simp- son, a real jet-propelled young-' who .-can run a 9.8 100, to the outfield corps, along with Jim Plorsall. Adding either of them to Alble Pearson, a former CIF sprint champion, gives Rigney a great deal of added coverage In the big outfields at Chavez Ravine. Simpson has lately had an injury to his left leg but should be-ready to go again. Dean Chance, winning In his first start of the year against the Tigers last is to- night's starting pitcher for1 tho Angels. H e heads u p the mound crew that held up bettor than most of the departments last season, when the Angels finished ninth. Barry Latman, the tradee from Cleveland, should also get an early start in his home stand. So should Bo Bellnsky, wlw wai iilcd to work with Latman in doubleheader laat Sunday at Cleveland that was rained 'out. The Tigers starling pitcher should be San Gabriel's'Hank Aguirre. He will be backed up by the Tiger one-two punch of Al Kallne and Norm Cash. It was the latter that belted a th mons ter homer. -t .all the Detroit, .that beat in the Angels In their last out- ing on Saturday. Tonight's'game opens stand' that Includes series' with P" land Washington for nine days. Wlth'vjhe 8, 8 p.m. a day game'jrlH follow Wed jjnd Thursday night a four-gametet with the Indians opens. PAGE TUESDAY, APRIL, 21, 1964 S.F. Wins Battle, But Loses BOSTON The Boston Celtics threatened the Sai: Francisco Warriors with one of the worst beatings in National Basketball Association playoff history Monday night white win ning a runaway 124-101 second-game victory. The game.erupted into a' one-punch fourth-quarter list fighl in which San .Francisco's Wilt Chamberlain decked veteran Boston reserve Clyde Lovellette with a right to the jaw. The.' fourth period bquabble came about when the officials called Lovellette for fouling Chamberlain. The two big pivot men had words and some scuff- ling ensued. Then, Wilt turned his kayo punch loose, knocking Lovellette to his knees. Blood streamed from the big Boston center's nose. waxed even hotter thereafter. .when Chamberlain was awarded the'foul shot and Lovellette later was assessed a technical foul. Celtics! coach .-Auerbaclj had to forcibly frorr the'flobftby Bill vhe.ight the -final victory-margin was four short of: the record playoff spread of 34 points run up by Ihe Celtics over the St. Louis Hawks on the same Boston Gar den boards on April 2, 1D61. However, the Celtics led by as much as 35 points at times and used reserves almost cxclu sively in the final quarter as the Warriors shaved Boston's huge lead. Boston coach Red Auerbach, though he would not admit it, was trying to hold the score down. "If they (the officials) called the game close, we could beat this team any place, any Anerbach said after his team's 23-point victory. "Everybody really did the job or us tonight. Russell did the big one but the other guys played great. We beat them be ;ause we .playqd That's stifl the rule.'Besides; lad the shots. We had a coupli df playsiwprking gobd-'fpr.'us. "I don't care if we win by tw< points or 200, just so long as w< vin. Everybody played ne concluded. The Celtics employed all 1 jlaycrs who were dressed foi he game. Only Jim .Losculoff out of action with a back ail fnent, did not see action. And even the last two John Larry Siegfried, broke' ih'tb th scoring column in the fourt quarter. San Francisco coach Ale Hannum, obviously shaken b the one-sided licking, barred a newsmen from his d r e s s i n room for nearly 20 minutes aftc the game and then permitte CELTS: See Page SAN FRANCISCO BOSTON OFT 9 6-4 24 Heln'hn Mes'ery Hlght'er j vi Ch'rloln H 4-9 Total! Son Fron Cisco Boita.1 1 Hovllcefc I -cllellt Ncdls i Ramsey Siegfried Met thy Totals Personal Son schery 1, Hlghlower 3. Atlles. 6, Rodgers, Phillips Seoi i.-...... sev Attendance 13.XW. Le't "3; 8cilon. 4. Russell 5. sco, rloln urmc THE SHORT AND THE Los Angeles Angels outfielder Albie Pearson (left) and Detroit Tigers fly- hawk Al Kaline made spirited drives for the -American League's balling crown in 1963. Kaline finished second with a .312 average, while Pearson was fourth on a .304 Both will see action as the Angels and Tigers open the American League campaign in Los Angeles to- night at Chavez Ravine. (Same time will be 8 p.m. Illness Fatal to Dyer HOUSTON Dyer, manager, of the 1946 worlc champion St. Louis Cardinals died Monday at the age of 53 for Ex-Champion Former light-heavyweight champion Harold Johnson drove Hank Casey to the canvas Monday night to score an eighth He had suffered a stroke Jan. knockout at Santa Monica Civic Auditorium. 19G3i Johnson, 35, of After 23 years as a player, floored the 29-year-old San and coach, Dyer re- Franciscan for an 8-count early manager, turned to Houston in 1948 and had been successful with busi- ness interests that included in- surance, oil, and real estate. Dyer's Cardinals won a world championship by defeating the Boston Red Sox the first year he was a major league manager. He quit baseball after the 1948 season when Fred Saigh, then the Cardinal owner, offered him only a one-year contract. in. the final round, and battered him around the ring for the next minute. Johnson drove a punch down at the weaving Casey, a 3-to-l underdog, landing it on top of Casey's head. Casey dropped to the canvas and referee Dick Young immediately raised John- son's hand in victory. The victory was Johnson's 72nd in an 81-bout career anc marked the first time Casey had The San Fran- ciscan's record is now 28 wins, 6 losses and 6 draws. Johnson, number two contend- er, had floored Casey with a short, brutal right in the sec- ond round. Pasadena's Larry McGee, 175, was stopped In the fifth round by R. C. Bobo, 169. NATS SEND, ROEBUCK TO PHILLY PHILADELPHIA Philadelphia P h i! 1 i e s pur chased -veteran relief pitchei Ell Roebuck from the Wash ington Senators Tuesday To; cither money or a player. Thi Senators have until June 15 ti decide which they want. The 32-year-old Roebuck posted a 2-1 record with th t.os Angeles Dodgers last yea before being trailed to tho American League Senators, for whom he won 2 and lost 1. Remember 1962? Opened With 1-5 By DON JOHNSON Don't feel too sorry for the cellar-dwelling Dodgers, with a 6 record to show for their first home stand of the' 1964 season. lie 1962 Dodgers opened with a 1-5 mark, then went on to ie Giants for the pennant. Tliis time the World Champion Dodgers could recover to win icir second straight National eague flag. They lead off their rst road trip at St. Louis Wed- esda'y night with 'southpaw itching ace Sandy Koufax going gainst Curt Simmons of the ards "Things can't get any worse, aid Dodger manager Walt Als- on following Monday night's 7-1 to the Milwaukee Braves, leir sixth straight defeat oung season. "I .wish I knew ie to our problem. 1 link it's the right combination f good pitching and hitting. ;cn (ot Play "I'm going to start Ken'-Mc- Wiillen, a right-handed hitter, t first base against St. Louis: vith Simmons, a lefty, pitching or the Cards. And we hav e we spent too much time ge ting our veteran hurlers read instead ot giving more atten tion to our other pitchers, whf didn't work too he said Milwaukee manager Bobb Bragan, -while thrilling to hi club's: two straight victorie over the Dodgers, still was ap prehensive of what the L.A club could do in the upcoming race. "They'll make a said Bobby, "and I'm not so sure it won't be on their first road trip. The. Dodgers wil! be in the race all the way, and what I said in spring training CROWD. COUNT. otxJov night 'M- season (seven dalnl 963 season (seven dates) iVillhtte's the third get another run across. The )odger rookie pitcher walked eiipe Alou, Ed Mathews and oe Torre- to load the bases, be- ore Gene Oliver's infield hit got across for a 2-0 lead. Then the Braves really ganged ip on Bob Miller in the sixth ag hey baited around to score three imcs. There were base hits iy Torre, Oliver, and Plnchhitler Ty dine, plua hree more walks to-do the trick. The Braves didn't let up against Miller in the seventh, scoring another run on hits -by 3Iiver and 'Frank Boiling. Phi! )rtega and Jim Brewer paraded o the mound after Miller, but not before the Braves got anoth- er run in the ninth on a double by Maye and Boiling's single. The Dodgers avoided a shut- out in the last of the ninth when Tommy Davis hit a single to left and Ron Fairly tripled to deep ieft-center. It was Fairly's. first triple in three seasons. He had none last year. For Boh ga'ms was both an achievement and a fallacy. The strong right-hander didn't allow a single Dodger hit from the third until the eighth inning. However, he struck out five straight times to tie a Na- tional League record. MILWAUKEE ao? LOS ANOELES obrh N a- Is I? Oliver Ib Move II Boiling 2b McMillan tcilne Mtaxc ss Muir Tops Glendale The Muir Mustang golf team slipped by Glendale, 16-14, Mon- day on Brookside's par 36 front nine. Dodger Class Will Tell in Long Haul JOE HENDRICKSOIV An Analysis oi Bad Start WHEN TUB LOS ANGELES DODGERS are winning, visitors to this desk approach with such comment as "OUR Dodgers showed 'em, When rocky periods occur, the usual opening statement is, "What is the matter with YOUR These being dog days in the Ravine, I accept the Dod- gers as MINE, not merely on sentiment but on caliber of per- formance. The results have been disappointing, but the play has been good. The Dodgers have had very levy favorable breaks. Not many teams with a record so poor have played so well or so hard. If the Dodgers were muffing ground balls, throwing wild- ly, running bases carelessly or there might be reason for some alarm. But this team made only two errors In the first six games. Many of the defensive plays have been spark- lers. Their only "bad" 'game was last night. Sandy Koufax has pitched superbly .'both, times out. S6 has Don Drysdale for seven innings in each, of his two appearances. Ron Perranoski is working into sharp relief form. Little fault can be found with the pitching generally. Drysdale must be wondering what he has done to de- serve his fate. The Dodgers plainly don't get any runs for him especially. He's jinxed. When fans see "Big D" fade olf n bit in late innings In a light game, often tliey become nnduly critical. Tho pressure of constantly pitching in Ihe fear of defeat if one run shonld be yielded Is very severe. Drysdale sel- dom gets a relaxing inning. This fakes a toif. Which brings us to the Dodger problem scoring runs. They have been getting close to a normal amount of solid contact, but th-j hits aren't dropping. Frank Howard's blazer to Ffilipe Alou. in the 12lh inning of Sunday's loss 1o Mil- waukee was typical at Dodge; fortune since the opening game victory. Or the fractional margin Willie Davis' drib- bler was ruled a foul instead of a hit in that same frame. The Law of Marginal Luck ALSTON BELIEVES marginal luck evens up over a period of time. He's correct. This Dodger team Isn't going to go on taking tough litck losses. Class will have to show over a perirxl of time. Speaking of fate going against a team, the Dodgers have been victims of some lazy calls by the men in blue. Jocko Conlon remained glued near third and made a long-range judgment call on Howard's "homer" that went for a single the other night. Augie Donatelli, behind the plate, hardly moved In ruling "foul" some 30 feet away where Milwaukee's Bob Tiefenauer finally put his glove on Willie Davis1 drib- bler, it was a very important call, for had Davis received the hit it appeared from above that he deserved, the Dodgers would have tied the game and possibly won. Certainly the call was too big for an umpire to make without a move for better viewing. But these breaks go against a team when the luck is all bad. WALT ALSTON tllll smiling JOHN WERHAS v skillful Three contenders St. Louis, Cincinnati and Milwau- kee have appeared here this young season. Despite the results, certainly these teams did not display any man-for- man superiority that would rate them pennant choices over the Dodgers. Call this prejudiced vision if you wish, but I wouldn't trade Alston's personnel for any of these three rosters. Some of the current Dodger balling avorages are very much Hint ol the impostor. Tommy Davis is hilling .173, Willie Davis .200, lion Fairly .237, Jim Gllliam .130. Hero are four regulars far below their noriri all at once! John Werhas picked up Sunday. This was relief to many who have admired his strong defensive work. Few would be happy if Alston had to bench a boy of Werhas' fielding skill. This brings up a point. Alston is being restricted a bit this campaign in his normal managerial style. He likes to play 'em when they're hot, and this pattern has worked In past years. But this seems to be a campaign when Alston is supposed to leave the "regular" in day after day. Wills in Right Style MAURY WILLS' HUNT AND PECK system of spanking infield dribblers and timely, well-placed bunts has this little battler off to a fine percentage start. At .346, Wills Is pacing the team offensively with nine hits, followed by Howard's seven. (All of these percentages and totals were figured prior to last night's game.) Pete Reiser believes Wills has the potential to win the National League batUng championship if he manipulates his bat just like he has been doing lately. The defenses in tho outfield have Maury pretty well bottled up if he chooses to swing away. Wills seems to hit a natural 200-foot line drive, and all the outfielders know where to park for the catch. His game is bunt, slash and run for his life. The Dodgers htiVB had 46 scoreless innings out of 56 played in tho first sbc games anil only IS runs. nro capahle of much more production than dial. Willie Mays Isn't going fo personally show a bcller folfll than an entire (cam for long. incidentally, could it be that the Dodgers are doing some time in purgatory these days for the job they pulled on the Yankees In the World Series and for generally show- Ing'so lltUe brotherly love lor the king they dethroned? 11 goes. There will be six simiieVlir McMillan lor Ortega ui fin. I f 8 Fifty-lb' S 1 3 1 Howord n 3321 fiasebsro c 0 2 3 Wcrhas 3b 2000 W.Oavls cf 1011 Wlllhlle D 2000 aParker 5000 Miller o Orlefla r> cMcMuilcn Brewer D 37 7 U Totals cul (or 4 0 i ill 0000 I i 1 ubs fighting it out for the pen- nt, and Milwaukee will be one them." Lee Maye got the Braves off d running Monday night with home run in the rightfield ands in the second inning. The raves took advantage of Nick WHIhlle In ouf Loi Anceles E-GIMtotn. Werhai 1 OH M] CM M -1 2. kM .I7-l3.t LOS j.7-13. LOB-Mlk HL-C ti-ii, 1.03 stnueiej L waukee II. Los Angeles 5 Move. 12-32 p-MIHsr u-Locdej. Stjlni Dw.olelll. 0 i S1 4 Baseball Standings NATIONAL LEAGUE W L Pel. GB hiladelphia 4 1 .800 an Francisco ..5 2 .714 ittsburjh......3 2 .600 1 Louis........ 4 3 .571 1 iilwaukee......4 3 .571 1 incinnati ......3 3 .500 ouston......... 3.3 .500 hicago.........2 3 .400 2 ew York......1 4 .200 3 XJDOEItS......1 6 .167 4 MONDAY'S RESULTS Milwaukee 7, Lo> Anfilis I. Phlkntdotilo at New York (postooned, AMERICAN LEAGUE W L Pet Baltimore ......4 ilinnesota 4 Detroit 3 Boston 3 ANGELS 2 Son Froncijco .Houiton 7, Sf. (Only Garros S Cincinnati I. n Loul! chedul bbrxi (0-0) Ctnclwoll 1JOJ VS. Normoo of Houston OJ vs. Owtni (Only ocmcs ichpdulrdl. WEDNESDAY'S CAMES Loi Angild at St. Loull Chlcooo al Ntw York P.lliburori 01 PhlloOclohta Cincinnati at Ho-jslon rnlohl Sa.i [nlghtl. Cleveland ihicago..... Kansas City Washington New York .800 .667 .600 .600 .500 :500 .400 .333 .333 .200 GB. 1 1 2 2 2tf 3 MONDAY'S RESULTS Boston 4. New York 0, mornlr.B earner ago tlernenl (Onl cold weolher. al noilpoMd. In- flames 'T TODAY'S PITCHERS Detroit Lory 0-1 ot Lot Anoeiet Chomi 0-1, nlBtil. Cleveland Gronl 04 or Kansas Ctfv Seoul 0-1, ,WasfKngton Kodlh M al Mlnntiola levelan ul 0-1, asfKn Koqt >-0. (Only ichedutedl. Frcmctsco ot MKwaukee. WEDNESDAY'S n pi roll al Us Angclls fnlgfil Ctcvttand al Kansas Cllv York ot ChTcago Boston al Baltimore (mc (Only carries chtl. Wlio Beat Whom... (Read across for wins; down for losses.) NATIONAL DODGERS San Francisco 0 Cincinnati ...J...... 3 St. Louis............ 1 Pittsburgh.......... 0 Milwaukee.......... 2 Philadelphia 0 Houston............. 0 Chicago............ 0 New York 0 LA SF Cin SL Pit Mil Phi Hou Chi NY 0 2 AMERICAN LANYMinCWDetBalCleBosKCW- ANGELS 6 0 0 1 fl 6 0 1 New York B. 00010000 Minnesota 00.0101002 Chicago 000.000200 Detroit 1010.00010 Baltimore 02020.0000 Cleveland 000000.010 Boston 0201000.00 Kansas City 00000000.1 Washington 1010. 00000.   

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