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Pasadena Independent Star News Newspaper Archive: March 9, 1958 - Page 1

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   Pasadena Independent Star News (Newspaper) - March 9, 1958, Pasadena, California                             WfATHBt TOOAY: CLOUDY NO SMOG (Frit n'eatbei Bejart oa Page B-U> independent THE DERBY SUkr SaOna, the M Ezptonr I. am MKi 15 CBITS 120 PAGES, t SKTKNtf PIUS TWO MAGAZINES -f ASADENA SUNDAY MARCH f, IfSS CA1VOMIA- to Mpftm the SMMM AMU Dcrfcy wcr Vjw KM MOTiH jnww'yB thli tart cfcMfc, rari Sftrti EflUor Bob Stafer'i story on page C-l of Independent. Star-News sports lection. OASintO SY OTHB CAU5 SY IT 1-I1M. ZE Russ Ask Asian Rocketless Zone i SUr-Ntws Photo Sandbags help protect George Lippmcotrs property from channel that has eaten dangerously close to his home. City Blocks Sidewalk as Building Sinks Pasadena street department employes blocked off a section of sidewalk last night as a 2 story business building ap- parently began to settle Into the ground, cracking masonry and threatening to pop plate glass windows. The structure Is the Led yard Building, 314 E. Union St. It houses the brokerage firm of Paine, Weber, Jackson Curtis, two real estate offices and a beauty shop. Cracks appeared between the first aiid second floors In the center section of the building. Plate glass win- associa- While Board 'Studies' Deep Channel Licks at Homes By PEGGY POWELL A handful of Altadenans are keeping a wary eye on the weather while they wait apprehensively to see if the county can help them. Their hope is that they can get through the rainy season without having their hgmcs washed away! Cause of their concern is a big one. It's 20 feet deep, about a block long and in places it's 30 feet wide. It's a channel cut by runoff that; [urns into a churning "river" every time it rains. rain itj grows deeper and wider and! By SEBGE FLIEGERS MOSCOW. (INS) The Soviet Union last night called for the establishment of a nuclear and rocket- free zone in all of Asia. An official Soviet govern- ment statement distributed by Tass accused the United States and its allies of plotting to increase tension and the danger of "destructive" war hi Asia. This plot, declared Russia, would be formulated at n e x t week's meeting of the South east Asia Treaty Organization in Manila. The peoples of Asia won't allow this, the statement said, from two days of unremitting and would demand the ban- Navy Again in Hard-Luck Rocket Effort CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. UP) The Navy edged its Van- guard space rocket to within 35 seconds of a launching yes- 58 Bodies Recovered in Rail Wreck cuts closer to two expensive s DE .UP) Rescue workers last night HEARING ASKED (removed 58 bodies from the Last December the tangled wreckage of three :hrough Attorney Harold M.J commuter trains that smashed Davidson, asked the C o u n t y! together north of Rio de 3oard of Supervisors to hold a! Janeiro, tearing on the matter, indicat-j At ing they had an inexpensive.were said the cracks apparently occurred Friday night and yes terday morning. He said he closed his office at 6 p.m. Friday. When he at- tempted to open Saturday morning, the door was jam- med shut because of the which would divert t he [water from going across tljeir properties and endangering their homes. Letters requesting the hearing wen; sent to each of the five supervisors, the attorney said. When he had received no reply by Jan. 7, Davidson said he contact- ed the clerk of the board j but finally had to its effort because oi terday "scrub" weather and technical difficul ties. Engineers assigned to the Vanguard project, exhausted effort, were virtually assurec of at least 48 hours of rest In Washington, Dr. John P Hagen, director of Project Van guard, indicated that the next tempt of the "colonialist pow- launchlng attempt would take ers" to maintain their "yoke" .over the Asian people. PROOF OF ACTION It charged the SEATO pow- ers, particularly the U. S. and place tomorrow.. WEATHER BLAMED said .t the firing was called dff settling. The door had to be pried open. Police said the city had re- cently installed new sections of sidewalk beside the struc- ture because the concrete had cracked. The building is owned by First Western Bank, offi- cers said. Dies of Heart Attack at Track attack yesterday as he was Jan. 27 agenda. When the leaving Santa Anita race track in Arcadia aboard a bus. least two more bodies believed still in the wrecked cars. Brazil railroad officals gave the estimate of 60 dead and and was told there was no record of the letters' having been received by the super- visors. A duplicate letter was sent35 miles north of Rio de A 65-year-old Los Angeles to the clerk and the matter Janeiro, man died of an apparent heart was placed on the supervisors' injured. They began an inves- tigation into the accident, one of Brazil's worst railways disasters. 3 TRAINS COLLIDE One crowded train speeding through rain and darkness slammed into two others halt- ed because of a signal failure at the village of Santa Cruz, issue came up for discussion, Broken hits of cars were scattered along the track. In one small area 15 coaches were the basis of the weather, clos ing and added that the launching would be resched uled "as soon as practicable." The Navy, for an undis- closed reason, Is determined to fire this particular Van- guard only during daylight hours. For that reason it called off Friday's attempt before noon because delays hi the count- down or preliminary check said about 100 persons were made it clear that the firing not made beforc dar There were technical delays again yesterday 72-foot Vanguard rocket temperamental beast. INDEFINITE HOLD But then things got rolling until a.m. EST, when an "indefinite hold" was ordered because of a low cloud ceiling. Safety regulations at the Cape require that there must be at least feet of visibility be- fore a rocket of this type is fired into the sky. As the minutes passed the said he was told he telescoped. Wires of the elec- ,AS, V1? minutes passed the present information trie railroad snapped lllted dissipated, but Arising winds Davidson Police identified the victim'eouid not _ as Alexander Burnside. He'since it was not a public hear-'dropped over the was pronounced dead at and the supervisors voted adding to the panic. ,mar runner delayed the launc p.m. jto referjhe. matter to the: Ljghtnjng flashed and rain fell in torrents as hun- dreds of men from a nearby Air Force and from hospitals worked in the night to pull passengers U.S., ALLIES ACCUSED OF WAR PLOT Move Seen SEATO Parley Counterblock ring of nuclear and rtcket weapons in their lands. The statement said the SEATO meeting was an at- Britain, of helping the "rebels' in Indonesia and said that maneuvers of the American Seventh Fleet and the British Far East fleet off the Indo- proof of such action. (Western observers saw last night's statement as another Crown Prince Soif At Islam Al Badr of Yemen, left, and United President Nauer, sign federation Ike Proposes Extension of Job Benefits WASHINGTON. OB' Presi- dent Eisenhower yesterday pro- nesian archipelago represented posed to extend unemployment benefits "for a brief period" and said the government was of Russia's efforts, to cause'Speeding'Up spending in a num- dissension among the Allies ber of fields to combat the eco- and dismantle NATO, SEATO nomic slump. But he strongly and the Baghdad Pact.) The statement called on the Asian nations to sign a "collective peace treaty" and warned them they would not be free from nuclear attack hi the event of war. opposed a revival of "pump priming" of the WPA or PWA kind. OUTLINES PLAN In a letter to GOP leaders of YEMEN, UAR SIGN FEDERATION-PACT CAIRO, Egypt. UP) Yemen's primitive monarchy yesterday formally federated with President Nasser's revolutionary A J United Arab Republic. The signing ceremony was held at Damascus in what, is of Union comprising now the province of Syria under UAR. Nasser signed for UAR and Crown Prince Saif Allslam Al Badr for Yemen. The federation will be called, the "United Arab States." The charter left the door open will be assisted by a Council equal from numbers of members Yemen and UAR. .This, setup will work to unify the-armed forces and foreign policy and coordinate economic and cultural affairs. Ahmed ittle more than a tight alliance between two countries UAR He mre or is proposing to help spur .member states will retain their size of South Dakota, is sepa- international status and re- rated from Egypt by the Red It accused the Western pow-.Congress, Eisenhower out- ers of wanting "to turn the lined measures he has ordered! territories of Asian members of SEATO into bridgeheads onto which inevitably would "all answering blows directed against the aggressor." The statement added: PEACE ZONE 'In full conformity of the and Yemen. RETAIN uig, LH-uuii jtcuciai aspirations of the eastern and flood t j nloc nil 1 tn A pin fllw e projects. Some of the meas- ures would begin to take effect Dam Disaster Recalled in 'Scene' Today It was 30 years ago this week that the giant St Francis dam in San Eran- cisquito Canyon north of Saugus burst. The wall of water that swept down the canyon and then along the Santa Clara River bed took 450 lives, destroyed 700 homes. Revisit the site of this dis- aster this week via a Scene auto adventuring travelog by Russ Leadabrand. Flood riven San Francisquito Can- yon is nojv the site of two large power stations. Traces of the broken dam have been erased by time. You'll find other interest- ing features, articles and hobby stories in Scene Maga- zine today. Don't miss it the: County Road Dept., County Engineer and County Counsel. STILL STUDYING This week the County Coun- sel's office told the'Independ- ent, Star-News the two de- partments were still working CHANNEL: Turn to Page 4 Leg Crushed Between Cars 35-year-old Arcadia gar-: A age amputation of his right leg last night, after he was from the debris. Thirty ambulances took survivors to hospitals. No U.S. citizens were reported aboard any of the trains. CNADVISABLE SPEED A Federal Railroad System spokesman said: "The mov- ing train was proceeding at an unadvisable speed and struck employe faced possible. the other two with tremendous impact." He said the victims were without medical aid for between two cars. The victim was Louis Lyon, 455 N. Canyon Ave., Monrovia Doctors, at Arcadia Methodist Storms which have flooded parts of Brazil damaged the signal system. While two of the trains waited because the Lyon was car toward a lube rack of his service station at 4 W. Foot hill Blvd, Arcadia, when the iccident occurred. TODAY'S FEATURES Auld Lang Syne.........10 Child Care ...............8 City Classified ............Bl-H Editorial ................10 Finance ...............A2-3 Footlights...............11 Home Garden......Scene Kids .................Scene Radio................Scene Weather Forecast High cloudiness this morning, mostly lospital said the leg was-signals were out, the third crushed below the knee. j apparently moved on with no According to police warnings of any trouble ahead, directing another New England Red Probe Set WASHINGTON. (INS) The chairman of the House Un- american activities Commit- tee announced plans yesterday to investigate Communist party activity in New England. Rep. Francis E. Walter (D- Pa.) said a five-man subcom- mittee he heads will hold three day: of public hearings at Bos- ton court house, March 18 through 21. Waiter said in a prepared statement that preliminary study indicates Red activities Real Estate............A4-5 Show Time..............11 Society................Dl-8 Sports.................Cl-4 Theater .................11 Television............Scene Valley News C5 Vital Statistics.........Bll Weather ...............Bll Your Rlrthday program. It would be folly to push ai object as long and slender an unstable as the 11-ton Van guard up into cross winds tha might topple it-before it couli gain the speed to withstani such forces. Workers on th Vanguard say they prefer no to attempt a launching in winds'of more-than 15 miles per hour, even though offici ally the rocket is supposed t be capable of rising through winds up to 20 miles an hour. The winds, too, died down and it turned into a beautiful warm, sunny day with ROCKET: Turn to Page 4 Bunny this afternoon nnd tomorrow. Little change in in New England are "continu- tcmpcraUiic. Minimum yesterday 42, -maximum-64. SuniinR in sets today p.m. Sun rises tomorrow at tions." threatening proper- Self-Poisoned Boy Reported in Good Condition A Pasadena boy who draank a solution of carbon tetrachloride and household liquids in a suicide attempt because he feared being re- turned to Juvenile Hall was reported In good condition last night. The 11 year old boy's mother told police she had threatened to return him to Juvenile Hall. Minutes later, she found him drinking the mixture, which Included car- bon tetrachloride, ant pow- der, laundry bleach, kero- sene, shoe polish, chocolate anil water. He was taken to County General Hospital after emer- gency treatment at Hunting- ton Memorial Hospital. lies all countries in Asia can and must set up a peace zone >vhere there would he no place or nuclear or rocket weapons. "Judging by everything the SEATO council session in Ma- nila is called upon to prevent this." The statement reminded the Asians that it was they who suffered the effects of the first atom bombs dropped on Japan in World War II. Observers in Moscow saw the Soviet statement as added evidence of the obsession the Kremlin leaders have with RUSS: Turn to Page 4 lion people living in villages and fortress-like towns on the western shores of the Arabian charter stipulates that, peninsula. His slate, about the business and provide more jobs. Among steps mentioned were speedups in the tempo of highway building, reclamation projects, aides to homebuild- ing, construction of federal gimes. That means a primitive'Sea monarchy like Yemen retainsj its own system within the fed- eration. Yemen's crafty old king, Iman Ahmed, has not handed over his country to Nasser as the Syrians did last month. The terms of the federation, NEW POLITICAL WIN Yesterday's federation agree- ment was the third Arab union in six weeks and appears the loosest of the three in struc- ture. But politically it gives Nasser a new victory for lead- as released by the Middle East ership of the Arab world. 1959 or later. quickly, others are planned f or News Agency, stipulate that Ahmed and Nasser will preside jointly over the United Arab States. This means Ahmed re- tains virtual veto power over any decisions affecting federa- Seek Clothing Strike End NEW YORK. OP) Emerg ency mediation efforts were aunched yesterday to seek an early end to a strike that has halted output of three-fourths of the women's clothing pro duced in the nation. The strike already had cost he industry an estimated mil ion dresses, suits and coats. The workers had lost more han six million dollars in vages. Herbert H. Lehman, former ew York governor and U.S senator and a veteran of 34 'ears as u labor arbitrator, and Harry Uviller. impartial ress industry chairman, sat own with union and manage- ment officials to try to find a ettlement to the first indus trial garment strike in 25 ears. OFFICER KILLED HAYWARD. UP) California lighway patrolman Raymond O'Connor was killed in- tantly yesterday when the alrol car in which he was iding was hit by an oncoming ar on Eastshore freeway. Two Sailors Asphyxiated RIVERSIDE. Two sailors were found dead in a hotel room yesterday. Police said they apparently had been as- phyxiated. Investigators found the bodies of Angus T. McPher- son, 19, and Ronald R. Win- ter, 20, in a room with the window closed and the gas heater blazing. Both sailors had been stationed at Long Beach. tion. 2-MAN COUNCIL Nasser and Ahmed will form a two-man high council. They The first and tightest of the unions was the merger of Syria and Egypt under one president and government. It promoted Iraq and Jordan to form a rival federated Arab state under King Feisal. Dele- gations of the two nations open a meeting in Baghdad today to work out the details. Two Critically Hurt in Freeway Crash A Monterey Park man and his 21-year-old Alhambra woman companion remained in critical condition last night at County General Hospital, almost 24 hours after their car SAUCY PERFORMANCE ANITA A 'PLAIN TOMATO? MIAMI, Fla. UP) Curvaceous Anita Ekberg was pelted with tomatoes last night by a local stripper who jumped up from the front row of a theater where Miss Ekberg was appearing with comedian Bob Hope. Amid an audience uproar in the Gables Theater, Evelyn (Treasure Chest) West, 30, was led to Coral Gables police station and booked on disorderly conduct and investigation of assault and battery. Just as Miss Ekberg told Hope, in a stage sketch "I'm just an ordinary West yelled: "You sure are" and let fly with two tomatoes she produced from her handbag. They hit Anita halfway down the front of her black strapless gown. "What's the matter with the blonde actress said In amazement. Hope wiped tomato splatters off her dress, muttering "Nothing like this has happened since my old days in vaudeville." Police quoted Miss West as saying Anita had walked out during a West performance at a Miami Beach night club. Hope and Miss Ekberg continued their round of theater appearances in connection with a movie they made, "Paris Holiday." Police said that whether Miss West Is charged with assault and battery Is up to Miss Ekberg. was demolished in a San Ber- nardino Freeway accident. They are U'nrrie Alfred Felri- kamp, 38, of 1333 S. Isabella Ave., Monterey Park, and Eleanor Kortus, 1115 S. Olive Ave., Alhambra. California Highway Patrol- men said both were hurled off the freeway and onto the Paci- fic Eiortric tracks 20 below. Their car was strewn all across the freeway. Feldkamp drove the vehicle into a retaining wall near the freeway's Baldwin avenue over- pass in El Monte. Five other cars collided when drivers stopped to look at tho crash. One man was injured. CARRIER SAILS SAN DIEGO. (IP) The air- raft carrier Shangri-La sailed for the Far East yesterday, i taking the first squadron of I Grumman F11F Tiger jets to tour the Pacific with the 7th Fleet.   

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