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Oxnard Press Courier: Thursday, July 15, 1943 - Page 1

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   Oxnard Press Courier (Newspaper) - July 15, 1943, Oxnard, California                                 AMERICAN  PRESS FIGWTS FDR BAN ON ALLIED FOOD CONFAB  <  Washington (U.R)—Tho deterioration of President Roosevelt’s re* Jations with Washington newsmen and women took a new and formal aspect today in a protest submitted by the standing com-m it tee of correspondents.  The committee Is elected by the members of the Press Oaller* ies of Congress. It is the only organization qualified to speak for the Capital Newspaper Corps. The committee protested Mr. Roosevelt's order that newsmen and women shall be barred from all but routine and formalized  coverage of next month’s United Nations* Food conference at Hot Spring, Va.  “The standing Committee," Its protest natd In fmrU “regards arrangements excluding  the press from Jill contact with the delegates and deliberation** off the fortheomftng fond confer-ence—except at two perfvnc-tory formal sessions«-«* denial off legitimate news to the Am* erlcan public and hence an abridgement of the freedom off the press*  “The conference In qnestlon  will not deal with military mat*  ters. It will deal with one of  the most vital elements of onr  national life—food« The Office of Censorship has expressed no concern regarding It. The Standing Committee believes the American people are entltl* ed to know the decisions made through promnt on-the*gronnd reporting by their traditionally free press/’  Copies of the resolution have been sent to Mr. Roosevelt, Secretary of State Cordell Hull and to Director Elmer Davis of the  Office of War Information. The committee members, who approved the resolution unanimously,  were elected this year to serve a 1943-44 term» They are: Ned Brooks, Scripps-Howard Newspaper Alliance, Chairman; Cecil B. Dickson, Chicago Sun. secretary; Jack Bell, Associated Press; Edward T. Folllard, Washington (D. C.) Post; and milk ley Griffin, Hartford (Conn.) Times.  The food conference will convene May 18 within the spacious grounds of the Homestead, a famous resort hotel which has been  taken over by the State Department for the occasion. Delegates will live there. Newsmen and women will be barred from the hotel and from the grounds except during the formal opening and closing sessions. Then there will be speeches general and non-controversial in nature • which may or may not reveal all that the conference sought to achieve and methods by which achievement was undertaken.  There will be a press office established at n considerable distance from the hotel where  newsmen and women will be given snch Information regard* inir day-to-day conference developments as the Administration deems the public »hontd have. The decision to conduct a substantially closed conference was Mr. Roosevelts and was not made by nor, no far as can be ascertained, even endorsed by any off his publicity aides.  The point is made here and in editorial comment around the country that this is a post-war food conference and that secret discussion scarcely can be de  fended on grounds of military security. It further is suggested that barring news men and women from this conference would offer precedent for further departure from customary practice In such negotiations so that there might be a whr>le series of secret United Nations huddles to work out post war problems, culminating in a peace conference which also might he undertaken at some remote place from which reporters would be barred.  Thirty-one nations so far have accepted invitations to be represented at Hot Springs. Accept  ances are expected from 11 more to complete the full roster of United Nations and associated nations.  Rettolntion* have been offer* ed In tmfh House and ftcnafO providing that tlic pre«s flint representatives of Congre** shall have dally accrs* to con* ference meeting«. These resolution* have exclusively Republican sponsorship. The Democratic chairmen of House and Senate committees to which they have been referred indicate that tliey will obtain little attention, tf any.  The  Mr. and Mrs. J, /?. Silva and family were thrilled last night .nrhen they received a long distance phone call from their son, Pvt. Joseph Allen Silva, from Miami Beach, Florida.  Joseph is stationed irith the Army Air Force Mechanics there.  United Press Leased Wire  Serving The Greet Oxnard District  Because the Heabee band didn't show up at the t’HO dance last night, Jack Nash and Neil Whitney had some tall explaining to ck>—and an elec-tical problem didn't help the situation.  However, they promised a band for next Wednesday night and have guaranteed its appearance.  till, yes, the electrical problem was finally solved and the phonograph worked after three hour* of anxiety on the part of Mt •s*rs. Whitney and R. Nash —they forgot to turn the darn thing on, the Stroller was told.  Stroller just got to thinking the other day lit was an effort, but we, a la Red Skleton, “dood it”) along around this time next month annual Mothers Day fetes will be but a memory.  Just a little more prodding and we were wondering who the oldest mother in Oxnard was. Also who had the most children, then we |Hindered over the youngest mother here in town.  How alxmt a little help in our quundry, mothers? Maybe we can get up a little red-Hot competition. What do you say?  VOLUME 35, NUMBER 241.  s  OXNARD, CALIFORNIA, THURSDAY, APRIL 15, 1943  FIVE CENTS  JAP  ONSLAUGHT  DUE  AS  FLEET  POISED  Ranch Foreman Nabs Army Praises  Hospital Escape  Sheriff’s deputies continued to search late this afternoon for two escapes from Camarillo State Mental    * after  three who had escaped during the night were A , or returned to the institution.  One of the men, clad only in a blanket, broke into the ranch home of William Wood-  St roller received word from Pvt. AI Qtiien of the Army Air Forces Troop Carrier Command at Stout Field, Indiana.  The field is situated near In-^ diunapolis.  Lieut. M. A. “Bus** Culver son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Culver of this city is now attending Harvard University.  Bus is undergoing a three-months training course in suj>-1 ilv administration in the Army Supply officers training school, graduate school of business.  —o—  Mrs. Georgette Kane of this citij received a letter this week from her son Tom. who is sta* ) toned an an island in the South Pacific.  In his communique, the Stroller learned, Tom revealed that he is non' Corporal Tom Kane* r. S. Marine Corps. Sot bad, h uh?  -vVv-  Drapeau Lauds  Public Schools  The Public Schools Weeks proram drew 2(H) Oxnarders to Oxnard high school auditorium last night, to enjoy the well-planned presentation by the Ox-nord Masonic lodge.  Carl Dwire, who had charge of all program arrangements, was master of ceremonies.  The proram began with a half hour of march music by the Oxnard high school band, under direction of Paul Hummell.  ard, foreman of the Broome ranch south of here, and was overpowered after arming ing himself with a 38 caliber  pistol which he had taken from a drawer in the Woodard home, officers reported.  Those escaping some time last night by sawing the bars of their ward, were listed as Prudencio Yorba, 53, Robert Main, 35, Salvador Espinosa, 22, Frank Dubois, 30, and Charles Fletcher, 40.  ONE HFTURVFO  Dubois assertedly returned to the institution early this morning on his own initiative, Fletcher was cantured a shor* .while Vv ter on a farm road near the hospital.  Main was captured by Woodard.  About 11 o’clock this morning, \V oodard told officers he saw the rear door of his hfc>me standing open. His wife was away at the time, so the ranch foreman went to investigate. He found the class in the door had been smashed by someone apparently forcing their way into tile house.  Woodard entered and started across a room when he was faced by a man standing in the door of a bedroom with a pistol in his hand. The man was fullv attired in Woodard's clothing. The ranch foreman reportedly lashed out with his first and knocked the intruder to the floor and disarmed him. Suspecting it to be a hospital escape, since numerous  TRIAL OPENS ON SABOTAGE  The sabotage trial of Jessie Lee Gordon, Oxnard Negro, began today in Ventura superior court without jury as witnesses testified Gordon had appeared disgruntled over failure of the Mira Loma Flight Academy officials to recognize his ability as a mechanic and allegedly slashed fabric on tw* \ »ii •nl»nes*. /  Drill Test  TOM HARMON, FORMER OXNARD CADET, MISSING IN FLIGHT  '1 tie aliegefr ^iasilnifr of me plyanes took place earlv this year after Gordon reportedly had been relieved of duties as a mechanic and put on duty as a plane “cranker.”  On the stand today were John Smith, youthful Negro fellow worker of Gordon at the time of the reported plane damage, Fred G. Wagner, detachment plane inspector and Wayen Cooper, maintenance supervisor at the academy.  HKAKI) SLASHING  Smith testified that he did not see Gordon actually slash the fabric of the plane, but that he was standing only a short distance away and heard the noise of the rioping. Gordon alleged in previous testimony that Smith took part in the destruction. Wagner testified as to the ex  patients have been reported won-  tent of  damage to the Stearman dering on the Broome ranch, trainers  Woodard Phoned the hospital and hooper stated that Gordon had  pmvpPKiiviHinvM     l)een  relieved of duties as a me  PKKPAKKI) PHO\ 1SIONK    chanic because of constant com  Hospital attendants arrived lining that he was not being  shortly and identified the man as     pn nni?h  Main. They saidi he had a‘Æ’ District Attorney M. Arthur tat Ioni ofbeing tat hei ^    Waite represented the prosecu-  blc chaiactei. Main told them I » todiiv with Attornev Irwin  V,"U' S ï'oxmii “SWÏ  nue aV tînt he hud «>vltfitted ^ <m- The lrial win resume  ' u,e  h&f fiorn WoJùml's *-l..se.     10   He also had acnuired the gun I contmue  ^  m  ‘_  and had collected a large store of provisions which he said would have aided him to “hole out in the hills” for a while.  Another gun was missing from the Woodard home and it was feared that it had found its way into the hands of one of the other escapes. The gun later was found  i » V i ii. i players were a bidden in the bedroom of the  an dOaks, passe colorful sight in their blue and Woodard home where it had ap- f Yesterday, red uniforms with highly polish-    i v  been nlucerl bv Main    »„...  Thousand Oaks Woman Succumbs; Funeral Saturday  Mrs. Esther Dahl, 68, Thous-passed away at her  “Your improvement has been vast and very marked./*—Major J. E. Jardine, Jr.  ‘*1 wouldn't say that this 1s the best drill that we have supervised in Southern California, yet I have no hesitancy in saying that it has been one of the best.” —Sgt. O. A. Richmond.  Meml>ers of the Oxnard Civilian Defense Corps heard these opinions expressed last night at the conclusion of a huge city-wide incidentd rill supervised by 10 ranking officials of the State Council of Defense.  The satisfactory reports of these experts who observed the personnel and facilities of the defense organization in action last nigh were welcomed words to the hundreds of members of the local corps because they more or less erased the memory of the thing 'denunciation of thetr Starts at a similar drill heMHrt November of last year Twenty-five Incidents, including three major incidents prepared by the visiting observers, were run through the Control Center under the direction ofw? P. S. Cummings. These 25 iiradeitts cleared the Control Center and equipment and personnel were dispatched to handle the incideuts in the various parts of the city within 35 minutes.  OBSERVE OPERATIONS  OCD and Army observers and checkers critically observed operations at the Control Center and watched the equipment as it sped to answer the calls for assistance as well as followed the air raid wardens and other workers as they performed their various duties. Most all departments of the local corps were singled out for praise and there was no apparent breakdown in the functioning of any group. Of course, some minor imperfections presented themselves; however, these were of a character which  (Please Turn to Page Seven) -vVv-  Meeting Planned For Local Hog Raisers, Report  Tom Harmon, Michigan’s former All-American football star, and one of Mira Loma Flight Academy’s outstanding former cadets, has been “missing” since April 8 in a flight over Latin-American territory, the United Press reported today.  Harmon graduated from the local flight academy in 42-J after compiling a record of out-standing achievement in ground school classes and a better than average record in flight training.  The former football great joined the forces on March 22, 1942, and was commissioned a lieutenant only recently. He was flying “Old Butch,” bearing No. “98”, the number he made famous on the gridirons of the nation. He was one of the greatest backs in Big Ten history and held records for scoring.  The former Oxnard trainee recently was pictured with his t>omber at a Caribbean base, the photo taken shortly before he left on the flight from which he has not as yet returned.  As a cadet, Harmon was  highly popular at Oxnard and  was a willing student. He soloed in less than six and one-half hours of instruction, despite the fact that he had never had previous training. His local instructors said he was eager to learn flying and that while he was by 'no means a flashy flier, he was steady and very dependable.  His parents, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Harmon, received the news in their Ann Arbor, Mich., home which Tom had built for them and said they held out hope that their son still was alive and would turn up soon.  Africa Scrap Nears Climax  Allied Headquarters. North Africa <U.R>—Bfitish and French troops smashed through strong Axis opposition to seize two strategic hills guaiHing the outer fringe of the northeast Tunisian coffin corner today, while Gen. Sir Hernard Montgomery massed for a frontal assault on the enemy coastal defense lines.  Striking quickly in an effort to prevent Nazi Marshal Erwin Rommel from consolidating his  NIPS COIL FOR STRIKE AT AUSSIES  Some whore in \rw Guinea (Delayed)    Lieut. Gon.  George (\ Kemiev, air com-innmler In the southwest Pacif* ic, siiid today that the Japanese “have too many airplanes around these parts for com-fort,” giving them numerical superiority over the Allied Air Force.  Wash in et on (UR)—Secretary of \Var Henry L. Stimson to-dav said the SoutInvest Pacific will receive ample airplanes to  i i • i replace all losses and liuild up  new lines around Tunis and Bi-  forc ,, M there  i„ sufficient  zerte, British infantry made a |  S | r «'nsth to couutor th«> enemy.  fierce attack through mountain country and captured the hill mass *Mass Djcnel Ang,” eight miles northwest of Medjez El Hab.  French forces advancing in the Ousselfca sector pressed northward and took Djebel Sefsouf. about seven miles northeast of Karachoum.  MORE *RlHONKR*4    ^  -    .A total of 600 more prisoners,  London (U.R)—A big force of ler-Benz Aircraft Engine Works including 200 seized b ythe Brit  Allied Plones Rain Bombs On Big Nazi Industrial Base At Stuttgart  ed gold instruments.  Henry Schwab, Santa Barbara and Ventura concent violinist, thrilled his audience with three numbers.  Highlight of the evening was introduction of. Judge Louis C. Drapeau of Ventura County Superior Court, whose suhlect was “Public Schools and the War Kf-fort”  when he heard the ranch fore man enter the house.  v V v-  Funeral Services For Aged Pioneer This Morning  Funeral services were held  f4 MPitl hnl li*  , ,    I Muss ut the Suntu Clara Muuso  .luilKi* Drapeau naid common-1 ¡t*um  dation to W. B. Banister, prln-    He Is survived by a brother,  i lnal of Oxnard hi«h school, for    r,) Scholle, und his children:  his nart In civic county and state    Albert Wucherufennlg. Mrs. Mai  welfare Interests.    thu Furrer, Mrs. Ella Kestinu.  Concluding the talk, Judge    Mrs. Mury Gill and Mrs. Hulda  Drapeau stated that our fore-    Kodwlg; 13 grandchildren and  fathers had put their trust in    three great-grandchildren.  Clod and that in order to get back    Pall bearers were Hay Wueh  to normalcy in this country, we erpfennig, Ralph Haves, Paul  must aialn, turn to the Higher Richardson, Alvin Diet I rich, Jack  Power for strength and hope.    I Gill and Ralph Furrer  parently been placed by Main | she was t>orn November 8,  1874 in Putnam, Ohio, and came to Ventura county and Thousand Oaks 20 years ago.  Mrs. Dahl is survived by her husband, Kdward Dahl of Thousand Oaks, two brothers Willis Jackson of Michigan and Harry J. Jackson of New York, and two sisters, Mrs. Anna Rahn of Minnesota and Mrs. Mae Jones of Kansas.  The Rev. E. A. Main of the First Baptist church of Oxnard will officiate during funeral services Saturday morning at 11 o’clock from Oliver L. Reardon & Sons Deodar chapel.  Interment will follow at Ivy Lawn cemetery.  -vVv ----  Midnight Scrtomi  Los Angeles (U.R) — Joseph Lltulenbaum today was on tne lookout for a new residence to house “Kongo” his pet chimpan* zee under Superior Court order.  Neighbors complained the trained chimp was given to mid-night screams.  Hog raisers will be Interested in a series of meetings, sponsored by the Agricultural Extension Service of the University of California.  Feed conditions» cost of production. disease control and herd management will be discussed by Dr. H. S. Cameron of the University.  The schedule is as follows: Tuesday. April 20. 9:30 a. m., Calvin McNear ranch, south end of Willard road. 1 mile east of Santa Paula; 1:30 p. m., George Hickman ranch, Tlco road, Meiners Oaks; Wednesday. April 21» 9:;U) a. in., C. A. Everett ranch I ,os Angeles avenue, west of Moorpark, and 1:30 p. m. H. S. Mason ranch. Olds road, behind Ocean View Grammar school.  -vVv-  Toledo, Ohio, (U.R)—Harry .1. Mumiier of Lima is a iad you can't deter when he wants to get Into the Navy. He was discharged from the Navy lattt Deceinlior when it was learned he was only Uk lie’s 17 now, however, and Ju*t Iran sworn in again.  --WV--y-  Xenia, Ohio, (U.R)—Green Coun  British four-engined bombers loosed a thunderbolt saturation raid last night on the southwest Germany industrial center of Stuttgart while other planes— presumably Russian—simultaneously attacked east Prussia.  Twenty-three planes were lost in what the air ministry described as a “very heavy 0  attack on Stuttgart.  “The target was clearly identified and the attack was highly concentrated,” the Ministry said.  Three intercepting night fighters were shot down.  TONK OF BOMBH  Tons of bombs ranging from two-ton block busters to two-pound incendiaries were cascaded on Stuttgart's sprawling war factories, which include the Bosch Ignition Works, the Daim-  P0PEYE MAY NOT EVEN LIKE SPINACH  Washington (U.R) — I/x>k, little man, don't tell mother we told you, but—  A lot of the big boys in the army don’t like spinach either.  And your Uncle Sam doesn’t tell them they have to eat more of it liefore he’ll let them do his fighting. He Just lets them eat something else much of the time.  The special senate Investigating committee investigating the war effort has made a survey of the food situation in army camps, and one of the witnesses was Master Sgt. Horace S. Schwerin, memlier of of the staff of the Quartermaster Board at ('amp Lee, Va., He said spinach was the least liked of any vegetable offered to soldiers. Tomatoes are twice as popular.  The American soldiers eats most and wastes least the committee re|jorted, when:  The food on the table suits his taste.  He Isn’t told when to start eating.  He Isn’t interrupted by speeches and announcements.  He knows that he can light  up an after-dinner smoke. --—vVv -■ ■■ i.■  ami submarine engine plants. h s h at Mass Djebel Ang and loo Stuttgart also is an important taken by the French at Djebel railroad junction and. lying on Sefsouf, was reported in today’s the main railroads from Ger- communique, running the prund manys’ industrial Ruhr and total since the Mareth line of-Rhineland to the south, is a fensive to more than .50,000. To-key cog in the Axis supply sys- tal for the entire Tunisian cam-tem for Italy and Tunisia.    paign is about 35,000 prisoners.  A German broadcast claimed I  Qf the TO OOO prlsoners offi   daily announced since the Ma reth attack, about 7.000 were Germans and 23.000 Italians^The fact that the British caotured   44  We will keep the need* of the Southwest Pacific constantly in mind and there will be a s*te:nly and increasing flow of military supplies, particularly aircraft, to that theater/* Stint* son said.  Gen. McArthur's Headquarters Australia <U-W—A warning that  M a reat onslaught wttk ail the savagery of which the Japanese mind is cnpable” is impending against Australia, was voiced officially today after a military spokesman said that a reat enemy naval combat fleet was maintained constantlv at Truk, oniy three days sailing New Guinea.  Australian Air Minister Arthur S. Drakeford, addressing a war loan rally at MeHnmrno, said that the peril to Australia again was as reat as late in 15) IL “I warn you that Australia la danger—grim dancrer—in tho  peri-  that 15 British bombers were shot down.  No details were available of the raid on east Prussia* first dis-  whin! i?tA«Lmv f  ni-,i« a !lrn« I ™»stl.v Hermans at Mass l)jel>^l }n danger-grim ciancer-i ,    h^rriiw    however. indicated that ¡islands    our n°ith 'tn  that    mltRommel had completed the with-1 »«’.£, r *  I)r , ;ikt : f,), ' d _.: ai iL...  that caused no particulai dam* I r|pn\i>n| his iui<t    *mfi  aige." The attack was the third 1 nra " al  °‘  nii ’- '* st ,ou . e '  an,i   In five  both previous  ed by the Red Air Force against Koenigsbuerg.    I BRITISH M AHH  FKKRLK RKTALIATION    Montgomery’s Eighth Armv  German bgmbers struck back  was  massing along the Enfida-feebly during the night with  vil i c  i lnet a f M)Ut M mi | es snuth   raids on two towns on the     of TunLs ,  fnr an  assault on the  Thames Estuary and another in    enemy’s strong positions which  Last Anglia that cost them two    extend almost due west from the  planes. An air raid alarm was     roas t ¡ihout 35 miles to a range  sounded in London shortly after     u f hills running northeast to  midnight for the first time at     south west. The French hold night since March 8. but no 1 these hills and are advancing  rhp attnek wts the third urawm oi nis oesi lorces ano  da^s on east Prussia with  was startin *  his last  ditch stand  rlvï^nch n  defense of Hizerte and Tunis revious raids being direct-  with OV ' U .i, norman  rhû Rari Air    ntT'iino*  Wllil  CldtK UeilTldn Ulllls.  All For A Herein IKmh  Nelsonville. Ohio, (U.R) The war,  ty selective service board No. 2 I with Its by product—priorities on was confused for a period when I metals — reaches everywhere, twins with reversible names ap*: Maywood Rvers. farmer, inserted pea red fur induction. The twin.'i this advertisement in a Nelson were Kenneth Keith and Keith iville newspaper: “Will trade Kenneth Ketring, 18, of Osborn, I slightly used coffee pot and can Ohio.    opener for good screen door.' 1   bombs fell in the capital.  One German boinl>er was destroyed over Its base in northern France.  The British force of four-en-uincd Lancaster, Stirling and Halifax lx)inl>ers that made the 1,000-mile round-trip flight to Stuttgart was reported by some Southeast coast residents to be the largest ever to cross the Dover Straits. They said the bombers roared overhead in a continuous procession for 75 minutes shortly before midnight.  - ..........— vVv-  Trtmort F«lt At Hayward, Report  Hayward, Calif. <UJtf—A fourth and sharp earthquake lusting four minutes was felt at Hayward at 10:59 a. in. today, following three earlier tremors.  The first earth shocks were felt at H.M and 8:37 a. in. Two lasted four minutes and the third lasted two minutes.  Prof. Perry Byerly, University of' California seismologist who recorded the quakes, said they were all centered approximately :10 miles southeast of Berkeley, which felt the third tremor.  -vVv-  Carter Misting  Ix)s Angeles CJ.fi)—The family of Mike Carter today was notified that the 22-year-old former Loyola University foot hull cap* tain in missing in action in the South Pacific area.  Carter, a flying Lieutenant, quarterbacked the 1910 and 1011 Loyola teams.  slowly over rough terrain and deep gullies.  From the French-held ranges, the Axis line runs in zig-zag fash-ion northward, passing such ooints as Bou Aarada. Medjez-El-Bab. and Sidi Nsir and thence east of Sed Jenane and Cap Ser-rat to the Mediterranean. All available information still indicated Rommel planned to fight to the end in this strongly fortified sector, attempting to evacuate only a small number of  specialists and other units. -vVv-  “There looms an impending menace of a great onslaught with all the savagery of which  (Ploase Turn to Page Scvt*n> -v V v«-  Night Club Owner Sentenced In Manslaughter Trail  Lt. Comdr. CUartd  Los Angeles <U.R)—Lt. Cmdr. Lloyd V. Scott, navy officer with 20 years of service, today was cleared of charges of bribery and conspiracy to defraud the government by approving false claims for payments on experimental aircraft construction. -vVv-  Los Angelos <U.R)- After waiting for six years [a nuirrv the girl to whom he was engaged, it took a Japanese toroedo to make Merchant Marine Seaman K,»nt Alt ridge, 22. former l’ni\er>itv of Arizona liallpluver, finally make up his mind. Attrldge was in the crow's nest of a Liberty ship when the Jap tin fish struck. He got down in a hurry and into a lifeboat, meantime vowlnh that he would marry his sweetheart the moment he got home. True to his vow. Immediately upon his arrival here from Australia he was married to Miss Shirley Uheatam, 2J.  Boston (U.R)—Barnett Welan-skv, owner of the Cocoanut Grove night club was sentenced to 12 to la years in state privm today for manslaughter in connection with the fire at his club last Nov. 2S, which cost PI lives.  Judge Joseph Hurley imposed the prKon sentence on each of 10 counts hut ordered th it thev all he served concurrent lv-—the first day in solitary confinement and the test at hard lluor. The possible maximum sentence would have been 20 years in prison.  The Hi-year-old defendant, a Boston lawyer, leaned back In his chair in the prisoner’s doclc and stared ahead as sentence was pronounced.  Defense counsel, Herbert F. Callahan immediately moved for a stav of sentence pending an appeal to the Massachusetts supreme court.  Tear^ welled In Wi'lansky** eves as he walked from the court room.  -v V\    -  Easier Services At Oran For War Dead  Allied Ueiidiuiarters Nort I) Afrira »U.R' —The AllUnl I'uvern* iihmUs flKhtiiiK in North Afrit« will hmnir AnuTli'an soldiers who have died in the emnpalfin in special memorial servlies at Oran eemetery on Easter Sim« dav. it was announced today.  'Pile Oran cemetery for American soldiers is the largest in tha North African theatro. RHil-U anil French naval detaehineiu* as well as represent ut Ives of all branches of American fonts will participate in tho services.  *  *  * *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  *  Support the Second War Loan  Buy Your Share of the"Allied VICTORYJ J    

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