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Ontario Daily Report Newspaper Archive: November 28, 1970 - Page 1

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Publication: Ontario Daily Report

Location: Ontario, California

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   Daily Report, The (Newspaper) - November 28, 1970, Ontario, California                               County Delivers Smog Ultimatum to Kaiser SAN BERNARDINO The County Air Pollution Control District has asked Kaiser Steel Corp. to take a gamble Friday when it ordered the giant steel firm to replace the 90 oldest coke ovens in its Fontana plant by Jan 1, 1973 or bring the ovens into com- pliance with county anti-smog regulations by that date. APCO further ordered that the firm post a compliance bond of a day and the bond be forfeited if Kaiser could not meet the terms of the order. The action came Friday when the three-man pollution board granted Kaiser's request for a one-year exten- sion to operate its 27-year-old coke ovens. Kaiser officially indicated that the company is not sure if it is possible, through mod- ification, to bring the ovens into compliance. They told the board that it would take two years to design and con- struct new ovens to meet the board's ruling that the old ovens be replaced. If the company takes the replace- ment route, construction and design work will have to start soon, the company spokes- man added. The board said it had in mind the jobs that could be lost in the Fontana area if the ovens were shut down now. It said such shutting down would have a "substan- tial economic impact on those directly concerned, such as employes or stockholders and the entire county." Last week, a spokesman for Kaiser in supporting the com- pany's position at a pollution hearing, warned that jobs could be wiped out by closing the ovens which pro- duce up to 28 per cent of the coke used in steelmaking at the Fontana plant. Company officials esti- mated the cost of building new ovens at million. At Friday's hearing, Donald W. Jordan, a Kaiser attorney, said corporation officers will want to study the APCO deci- sion before making a state- ment. He said he has not been able to talk with the of- ficials to discuss the new rul- ing. Kaiser was asked by the board to submit "full plans" of how the company intends to solve the coke oven prob- lem within 60 days. This was the board's second request for the plans. Board Member Anthony Piazza, a Victorville attorney, complained last week that the corpooration "didn't give us a definite plan as it previously had been re- quested to do." Kaiser has gone on record as saying it is "economically unsound" to replace the old ovens before new technology is developed. New technology is expected in a few years which will give the new ovens the capability of meeting stricter emission standards than the ones now on the books. They said the steel compa- ny would like to continue us- ing the old ovens as they are now for at least eight more years. On that point, the hear- ing board commented that 20- 25 years is said in the steel industry to be the approxi- mate lifetime of coke ovens. (Kaiser's were built 27 years ago.) The board also required that Kaiser continue Us efforts to reduce emission leaks around the old ovendoors with a seal- ing compound; to shorten the period the doors are emitting pollutants. APCO, during a recent in- spection trip to the Kaiser Fontana plant, expressed its concern over the "substantial emissions" which, they said, comes from around various caps and standpipes on top of the ovens. The board has demanded from Kaiser the right to enter plant premises at any time and for the company to make progress reports on its efforts to control coke oven emis- sions every 60 days. The variance and its re- quirements, including the 000 a day bond, must be re- viewed at this time in 1971 unless APCO finds in t h e meantime that Kaiser has violated the conditions set down by the variance and then revokes the ordinance. THE DAILY REPORT ONTARIO-UPLAND, CALIFORNIA, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER TEN CENTS Die as Viet Bound Burns More Rain Forecast Waif Waits for Area Photo Angela Rene Ruffin, 4, stares wistfully across a table top waiting for her breakfast at the Raleigh Rescue Mission in Raleigh, N.C. She, her mother, Cora Lee Ruffin, and six brothers are homeless and destitute after rented house burned. 6 Children Die 10 Killed, 11 Hurt in 2 Car Crashes DOWNINGTOWN, Pa. (UPI) persons, six of them children, were killed and at least 11 other persons were injured Friday evening in two related crashes involv- ing five vehicles on the Pen- nsylvania Turnpike. The six children and their parents, who also were killed, were en route from their home in Philadelphia to Reading, Pa., to visit rela- tives. The father, who was driv- ing, apparently attempted to make a U-turn to avoid back- ed-up traffic resulting from the first accident and his car was struck broadside by ano- ther auto, state police said. "What happened there is purely Franklin Summers, turnpike operations director, said- "With the fam- ily wiped out, we'll never know." Summers said it was the worst accident in the 30-year history of the toll highway. Good Evening Birthday..................A-2 Churches ............A-5, 6, 7 Comics ..................B4 Entertainment, TV logs --B-5 Obituaries ................A-4 Sports Weather ..................A-4 The Philadelphia family were identified tentatively as Regis Allen, 27, a taxicab dri- ver; his wife, Mildred, 25, four sons aged 1 month, 18 months, 8 years and 10 years, and two daughters aged 5 years and 7 years. Two other daughters, 4 and 10, were in- jured critically. State police said the first accident occurred ,at p.m., EST, when a well-drill- ing rig went out of control on a curve in the westbound lane, crossed a median bar- rier and upset in the east- bound lanes. An automobile crashed into the rig. A passenger in the rig, owned by the Mobile Dredg- ing and Pumping Co., Read- ing, was killed. He was iden- tified as Edward Kline, 30, Glenmore, Pa. Five persons were injured. Eight minutes after the mishap and five miles away, Allen attempted to make a Uturn in the traffic-clogged easlbound lanes and was struck broadside by an auto operated by Mrs. Ruth C. Walters. Pa. A turnpike tow truck en route to the first accident struck the Allen and Waiters cars. Mrs. Walters was kil- led. Four persons were injured in the second accident. Supervisor Sees No Slide Threat Heavy rain and chilly temperatures were fore- cast for Southern Calif- fornia today as a frontal system moved down from the Pacific Northwest. More rain is expected Sunday. The Los Angeles Civic Cen- ter predicted a high of 58 to- day after an overnight low of 54. The high Friday in Los Angeles was 63. The maxi- mum Sunday is expected to reach 62. The Air Pollution Control District predicted no eye irritation from smog in the Los Angeles basin. Snow was expected above the 6.000 foot level in the mountains with rain predicted at lower elevations. Forest of- ficials in the San Bernardino mountains were con- cerned over the possi- bility of mudslides in areas blackened by recent brush fires. Daniel D. Mikesell, second district supervisor for San Bernardino County said that while fires have removed much of the hillside foliage "I don't think we're in any danger of homes being dam- aged by mudslides unless the rain is exceptionally heavy. And that's something we can't anticipate." Rain also was predicted for desert regions along with some gusty winds of 20 to 40 miles an hour. Upper valley highs in the 50s were pre- dicted while the lower deserts predicted maximums in the upper 60s. Small craft warnings were in effect from Point Con- ception to the Mexican Bor- der as rain and gusty winds of 15 to 30 miles an hour af- fected coastal sections. A Fireman Moves In to Battle Flames E. Berlin Cuts Prison Term for Area Studi BERLIN An court has reduced t seven- year sentence of Pomona Col- lege stqdent, Mark Huessy, Photo :d DC-8 Which Crashed on Takeoff at Anchorage ng the East Ger- tent to a total of for criti man gov five years Despite sentence, have cont the 21-y. ior's trial a still restri cans visas munisl nali Huessey's sentence was re- duced Friday when the court consideed an appeal by his (Turn to Page A4, Col. 3) eeps Mum Nixon IN (UPI) jrior Secretary :kel cancelled lation a press :xt week at reduction in i unerican officials to describe] college unjust and wilr issuing Ameti- visit the Com- 'Oh, Dear God, Help Me' Widow's Thanksgiving Plea Heard LOS ANGELES (AP) "I'm so lonely I could said the letter to the editor. "My phone never rings I'm the only one on earth. How else can 1 feel. All alone, See no one. Hear no one. Oh, dear God. help me.... "WiH somebody call The letter, containing a dol- lar bill and six stamps for anybody who would cafl or write, was signed Jean Ro- senstein. V The Los Angeles Times printed the letter Thanksgiv- ing morning, adding thai Mrs. Rosenstein is an 84- year-old widow and retired nurse living alone in a liny apartment on a month. Mrs. Rosenstein received so many calls Thanksgiving Day she finally had to lake the phone off the hook. "I hope the peopfe will for- give she told newsmen Friday, slightly hoarse. "I just couldn't talk anymore. The phone rang all night I only got two hours sleep." The next morning Ihe mail- man brought an armload of letters. Dozens of people slopped by her apartment. Many brought or sent flowers. Ev- ery table was covered with potted plants and the bathtub was full of flowers. "I've got the most beautiful bathtub in the said Mrs. Rosenstein. "I keep saying to every- body, lhank you. But it isn't enough. 1 want to say more." Mrs. Rosenstein hadn't had lime to open all her mail yet. People were still coming to Ihe door Friday. She turned down many tele- phoned invitations for Thanksgiving dinner and stayed by her telephone. But some of her visitors had thought of that "I've still got four complete turkey dinners in my refri- she said. WAi Waited without I confereri! f which he had promised to an- swer all questions about his abrupt dismissal by President Nixon, nickel's action came Fri- t-day shortly after a White House aide personally fired six other Interior Department officials, all close associates of Ilickel. Other dismissals were expected. Josef Holbert, nickel's press secretary, had re- quested on Thursday thai the National Press Club set up Ihe Wednesday luncheon press conference. (Holbert was one of the six officials dismissed.) But on Friday, an unidenti- fied Hickel spokesman told Donald Larrabee, chairman of the National Press Club's Board of Governors, that Hicfcel would be out of town Wedne -T nouncement tion, but Larrabee confi it when contacted by ne men. Hickel was understood to be in Texas Friday night, but his exact location was un- known. Hickel was fired Wednes- day in a 25-minute meeting with Nixon, one of the few times Hickel had met perso- nally with the President. Ni- xon then announced he in- tended to nominate GOP National Chairman Rogers C. B. Morton to take nickel's place. Jef Fuel Splaffers Victims ANCHORAGE, Alaska (UPI) A chartered jet with 230 persons aboard crashed while attempt- ing to take off in a freezing rain Friday night .and exploded, kill- ing a number of military personnel bound for Viet- nam. Military officials said there were 179 known survivors and 51 persons killed or missing in the crash of the Capitol In- ternational Airways DCS jet bound for Cam Ranh Bay. Forty-six bodies have been recovered thus far. Aboard were 219 military personnel and a crew of 11. "I heard a noise, then I saw the wings flutter and the plane said Joseph Heywood, who was working on bis car near the airport. "The fuselage split in the middle and a big ball of flames went up, maybe 120 to 150 feet he said. Other witnesses said the pi- lot was trying to take off but decided to abort. One of them said the plane smacked back down on the runway at a speed of about 170 miles an hour. The plane flattened a small fence, plowed under a build- ing designed to hold instru- ment landing equipment and slid to a stop trailing tons of burning jet fuel. The big plane began break- ing up as it bounded across the runway, shedding one engine. It broke into three pieces and passengers soaked with jet fuel tumbled out of the plane. The explosion came from (Turn to Page A4, CoL 7) Ineffective Drugs FDA Releases New List WASHINGTON (AP) The gov- ernment has released what it says is the most complete list of ineffec- tive drug products ever compiled. The Food and Drug Administra- tion said Friday some of the 359 prescription and non-prescription products were earlier declared to have little or no value in improving health. Others are already off the market. But the agency said it decided government purchasing agencies ieeded a more up-to-date guide. Among the prescription items on the list are Aureomycin lozenges, Neo-Cortef nasal sprays, various tablets containing Rauwolfia, an anti-high blood pressure compound, and Terramycin in some forms. Non-prescription products include Colgate dental cream with Gardol, Pepsodent antiseptic mouthwasb, Curad Medicated bandages and Amm-I-Dent toothpaste and tooth powder. The toothpastes listed did not stop tooth decay, the FDA said. The FDA said some of the drugs are simply ineffective in what their makers say they can do. Others, the agency said, are combinations of drugs which are no more effec- tive than their component ing- redients are when used separately.   

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