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Oakland Tribune Newspaper Archive: November 1, 1947 - Page 16

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   Oakland Tribune (Newspaper) - November 1, 1947, Oakland, California                                Home Owned, Controlled, Edited p Creation of World Order Challenges Our System and Imposes Great Domestic Tasks Beyond specific plans for stop-gap aid, or j they can come back out of the past too Jate tttisUmce limited to a specific number of, and with too little unless the present is Bitortal 0f Up (Brttmnr Oakland, Calif., Nov. 1, 1947 must be a broader and deeper program which shall have as its goal the crea- xtyn of some kind of international order fwhere individuals can buy, sell and invest. Until that goal, or its approximate is the gap between our standard of and that of most foreign nations can- be lessened, and until that gap is les- sened the United States, as a survey in For- tune concludes, will be "a lonely island of in the midst of a barren, brutish v; world." If any such goal is to be achieved, there 'must be a general assumption of responsibili- ties on the part of all groups as well as the "development of a conviction that while it is 'urgent to send aid abroad now and for some few years to come, it is equally urgent that "this aid contribute to the success of an endur- ing program. Fortune cites the three main tasks as: our own economy stable; preserving ''competition; and reducing that gap between pur living standards and those of other lands. are tremendous tasks and in each is t challenge to our system. At present con- Bumers need not be told there is a need "for to be done" to maintain some general equilibrium between supply and de- mand. Price control, rationing and allocation ,of. goods, are largely things of the past, but FELLOW By AD SCHUSTER A SIGHTLESS POET Samuel W. Bean of Alameda. who is blind, verse, capable of meeting its tests. There has been a mistake, perhaps, in plac- ing too much reliance on specific govern- ment measures and not enough on general measures that are essential to our whole j 4. tf> order. When we balance a budget, run and jn it j.inRS of thc surplus and retire debt we may do more to many doors that arc open to t 1 who cannot-sec. JJe is out wi keep prices in line than we do with enthusi- astic response to a' legislative panacea, by scolding, or by highly dramatized appeals. And if we are to have the sort of competition that makes for prosperity, the consumer must not be squeezed by the mono- polist, whether that monopolist be in indus- try, distribution, or labor. It is not too early to outline the ultimate goal and fortune's editors have contributed by giving circulation to suggestions which, boiled down, are a plea for some houseclean- ing in our domestic economy while we strive to improve that abroad. And while we think of an ultimate goal, It's No Fun Living Between Quarrelsome Neighbors those! with a! little booklet called "Light In Dark-' and thc verse below is one! lighter efforts. It is called' To be a scribbler is no joke; E'en with an education, Walt Mason was a whisky soak, And had no reputation, Until he found himself dead broke booze a vacation. To be a scribbler then of verse, Your pencil you must nibble- Next puff and stew, yea. even curse. While thought and feelings quib- ble. Then dash off lines in frenzied' haste I And murmur, 'Ish ka bibblc." Senator Taylor, who was going to ride across thc country to bind the natives with a spell of some kind.i has called the whole thing off.; Maybe the horse gave him a laugh.' Another rugged individualist is the fact remains that Europe is not going to recover without some further first aid and stopgap treatment. "Men who are starving are not likely to listen to lectures on in Edmonds. Wash. He! enterprise and if the market is to expand it will be because the United States now gives other peoples capital in the old-fash- ioned sense of the a fund to keep people alive and capable of working." ;THE WORLD AND THE CAMPUS We were impressed .by a copy of the "Stanford which came in the mail today, not only by the technical excellence of the paper but by some of its leading news ;stories. One story announced the Fall Relief Fund Drive to be held November 10-14. Stanford "fijr the' first university in the country to adopt another university. The funds from .the .campaign will go to various charities -but 30 per cent will be donated lo the Uni- varsity of Naples. Another announced the plans of the student council for UNESCO to assist students who -.will travel or study in Europe. Eventually it tapes to arrange exchange scholarships be- iv tween European universities and Stanford. the most important story con- oerned the program of the National Students the regional organization of rtfhich endorsed the recommendations of Mr. Grannis.and Mr. Farrer, Stanford students who toured Europe last summer; The plan ii to start jm educational project in Europe stiffed by American professors like that un- dertaken by Harvard at Salzburg; to initiate exchange scholarships, permitting a large number of foreign students to come to this .country at low cost; and to set up a central organization facilitating student travel to .Europe. On the editorial page a column points out the marked effect that Mr. Gran- nis and Mr. Farrer have had on student thinking about the condition of Europe, thus ing" in the Forum column, you may be in- terested to know that many of the letters written on the subject of Oakland, a hick village or metropolis, were unacceptable for publication. So here is some advice to Forum writers: holds up one of his own which reads, Discovery of two additional mag-! netic poles in the Arctic puts a new burden on the surplus property ad- ministration. But these two poles, according to the story, are not like the old re-] liable ones. They are merely "lo-j and only confuse persons who' are already off their base. Overheard: "I don't mind the left- overs, but the left-overs from thc left-overs get me down." Because real poets cannot' pre- ite inspiration, we expect lo re-' ceive a large number of Halloween poems, now the holiday is 'gone. Halloween is an occasion when witches on broomsticks offer wel- come relief lo those who are weary of seeing flying saucers and castles in the sky. IMPORTANT CENTENNIAL When we were a boy, bakers sold fried cakes which were the shape J of a collie's ear and brown. Occasional handicap uic.ri wncrc it popularity came with the discovery 1 DofVt indulge in personalities. The Forum is devoted to the discussion of public affairs. I da.'e inspiration, we expect trA 1 Itfdft mimVtAH ftf 11 Many letters are rejected because they con- tain libelous or vindictive statements about individuals. Don't neglect to sign your name and pro- vide your address. Preference is given to those who are willing to have their names printed, but the name may be withheld if the request is justified. Recently a large number of anonymous letters have been re- ceived. These are immediately discarded. Far more letters are received than limited space allows for publication. Those which are written on both sides of the paper are nearly always turned down. Frequently numerous communications on the same sub- ject are received. Jn the case of the 1'affaire Lafayette af least 30 letters said the same thing, which meant that only one or two were printed. These facts may explain why many con- tributions do not appear in print. But the Forum is a popular and interesting feature of this page and we hope that if can be kept so. PLENTY OF SUGAR There is no report concerning sugar that MATTER OF FACT By JOSEPH ALSOP VIENNA. Nov. in this great and once lovely city, the Soviet Union has launched upon venture of economic imperialism of really unparalleled crassness and THE GREAT WIDE WORLD- Are We Forgetting Lessons of Latest War? By WILLIAM L. SHIRER, Author of 'Berlin Diary' ruthlcssness. Furthermore, the ulti- mate purpose is to enthrall a civi- lized, innocent and anerily unwill- ing people, who stand among the founders of Western civilization. This is the real meaning of t problem of, German assets in Aus- tria about which the experts have already written so much. Since the drama of this strange situation has somehow been lost in transmission, an inexpert explanation seemJ t worth trying. I Very briefly, the Soviets were granted at Potsdam all "German- !assets" in Austria in part payment j of their greedy bill for reparations. 'Those were the days when even I the makers of American policy had not learned from hard experience that it was vain to seek a true set- tlement with the Soviet Union at this time. Under the delusion which !a few still cherish, they granted i Stalin this concession among many i others. They even did so without 'spelling out what was granted. j Thereafter, under the guise of taking reparations, the Soviet com- mand here seized control of almost every valuable piece of industrial property in their zone of Austria. 1 Eastern Austria, occupied by i Soviets except for the little quad- ripartite enclave in Vienna, was !the country's chief industrial area. THE BIG GRAB Altogether, they took more than three hundred industrial plants of .all kinds, plus such banks as they could lay their hands on, the Dan- ube Shipping Company, the Zis- tersdorf oil wells and tens of thou- sands of acres of farm land. Defini- tion of "German assets" was mirac- ulously broad. It even included some property actually American owned, such as the American inter- est in x'ital Zistersdorf oil resources. Nor was this all. Totally incred- ible as it may seem, the Soviets .blandly announced, "in the recent fruitless meetings of the Austrian, Commission, that they were the owners of Austrian The Nazis had constructed autobahnen in Austria after the anschluss. The Soviet negotiator. Novikov, had the i-ere the shape, A certain insight into the curious politically mature people like "Axis Sally" were dropped on marvelous gall to claim that both thC the S ?ne Si viWhCrC H lhCSC same token he laid lnt Ol-covery days might have been obtained last1 war-s cnd_ TWO of thc most noto-1 LACK OF EVIDENCE j a number of public buildings. But J'u 3S. Wry Centei I Tuesday by anyone who had thejrious of them, after having been The usual reason given by to read of treason. werc'dcpartment that there was cooked through and could be through. All of this took place i.. that is why bakers over are this year celebrating s" a y lo Caplain Greg. We trust that these stories reflect a real m-years, i he-Cuban crop is unusually large from within a fried- bakers sought to overcome the! carefully his newspaper, fault by putting a small dab of' The front pages, as usual, and. The British-arid indeed all the hanged. lack of evidence. But it is worth' dustrial plants which even the a sma a o jellvin thisrefiion imni.ni.tn.iJrf t 'exactly as i.. 1D.9. were pregnant rest of our Allies in Western Eu- notmg that most of hew Amen-, j in n.s region unpenclratcd by headline., about the Red rope-seemed to have a sure in- cans never denied that they broad-. heat, but the result was not always successful. We are talking about fried-cakes. Amcri-' Soviets could hot call German. KEY TO ECONOMY scare. There was the one concern-Jstinct about this business of their cast for Nazi Germany after war! jn the property thus claim- ing the latest report on the House! nationals who had given aid to the 'had been declared against their own1 ed by the Soviets is valued at be- Un-American Committee's amateur-1 enemy in time of war. To them -t'country. Most orthem. "Axis Sally" tween S700 and SSOO million. If it oecause they persisted long after attempt to pin a red label on'was a matter that could nnt be for- in particular, defended what they remains in their it will give someone had the bright idea to put! Hollywood There was another over'gotten, however frightened people had done and even boasted of it. I them control of key sectors of ihe a hole in the center of thc dough-'., announcing that "the United might be about the new communist i H action in itself was not, Austrian economy. It Is an immcnre j States is embarking on a world-, danger. There had also been a tcr-i treason then why. it may be asked, weapon of leverage, both to force jwide campiagn to combat commu-lrible Nazi threat against thc West.jwhs not the Justic Department will-1Austria into her destined economic The fried-cake was really the' x_. i juc ty luuikmi ..._ original and unimproved propaganda" and those who treasonably served it to let tnc accused stand trial to.place in a Soviet-dominated Danube .The "someone" with the idea, stroyj it you llad hawk cves to answer for their acts. test the contention? Surely this was, valley, and in the long run to add has it, was Capt. Hanson Crockeil rnmhprf ,h. Insi In our own land, this did not.a matter for the courts to decide, political subjection to economic Gregory of Camdcn. Me. then a ship's cook. With a hole in a fried- cake, he said with reason, the thine combed the paper carefullv last! In our own land, this did matter for the courts to decide, political subjection Tuesday you might have found, as1 turn out to be the case. Ezra Pound.'not for Department of Justice, j domination. The management of the I fmind in one I read, a liny item'the American poet who had broad-jThe court in Boston had found, properties has been care- wfth a one-line cast for Mussolini .-.gainst his own'any rate, that Chandler's Berlin.fully planned for this purpose. Ex- It was about another matter. At people and nation, was brought to broadcasts did intentionally give aidicept for the Danube Shipping Com- illustrating one of the principal benefits does not suggest this country is supplied with accruing from such projects. niore pounds to the person than at any concern witK international affairs. The I and so is the beel sugar crop of the West. students of today face even greater problems of peace and war than the generation of leaden now in the forum. There are many who believe that the fate of the world will If with Friday's end to ceilings at whole- sale level, prices of sugar go up, thc elevation will be proof of gouging somewhere along the line and it will be the duty of the govern- be decided in next decade. Whether this is j ment to do a little more than point a finger true or not. this Nation cannot have a sound at the guilty parties. foreign policy nor can it steer a wise course unless its citizens have a thorough under- standing of international affairs. And there is no better place to start than in the uni- versities. The relation of knowledge tc our politicaj-economic-social problems ought to be their primary concern. ADVICE TO FORUM WRITERS If you were entertained or indignant over the 1'affaire Lafayette which has been "rag- up with something tionary; "Nobody can tell ME what to says a fellow who wishes he kncwj what to do. And there arc who are so broad-minded they cannot spread their brains to cover thc area. teacher thc iticc Department said, and was insufficient evidence to try the Our Department of Agriculture, citing figures of crops and warehouse CI.VCH RADIO TRAITORS found guilty by a jury in the bv our attitude towards the alleged were workmen in Soviet plants United Stales District Court in traitors of Berlin. i given time off for the purpose. Boston last June and sentenced by a "Fundamentally jt shows thnt in'TREATY HALTED federal judge to life desire to forget thc war.. in order io The trial of Robert Best, the top which is natural, we arc also, this system, the Soviets are Amencan broadcaster for Dr. Goeb- lessons, which is ,o'sign an Austrian treaty until Was not the treatment accorded'bels after Germany declared war on pjd 3nd childish. Our reluctance to they have been this news as well as the news itself thc United was supposed to 00iher with the matter of treason i extraterritoriality in Austria. What indicative of how fickle and con- follow that of Chandler. For ,hc war js really an 'indication they want would have brought "Of course you understand we Americans had become it has never yet come off. of our greater reluctance to face up'blush to the check of the British r, boss asked thc prospect-i a pcople-and how fnghtcningly though I have seen a Iciicr from )o ,nc Who1e German problem, in the period of the opium war. IiailJ. mere IS aosoitlicn no bookkeeper. [forgetful? There had been a time Best, written from his prison cell. which. unfortunately was not per- They insist that their holdings and for higher prices on Simar.'' With that im "Certainly." replied the applicant, i in the life of the Republic when slating Hint he himself pressed for mancntly settled by Germany's dc- thc "profits" therc-from must bft to it. On my Jast job I used, wartime treason was considered a thc earliest possible trial. fcal untouchable by the Austrian state, mina. we Hie maihei triple-entry system-one set offcnre. Because radic. Charges others who broad-, Wc made that mistake after 1918 And when asked to define "profits" and demand action if the inexcusable takesp'1" boss lo 'he profits, a sec- j propaganda was such an'important cast for Nazi Germany during the consequences that were disas- .'or the Austrian Treaty Commis ond for ihe stockholders, to show'we.ipon in the late war and be- war. such as Donald Day. former gu' it is incredible to con-1 sion. Xovikov blandly declared tha' place. no prof il. a third for the income taxi thc phenomenon of radio Chiraco Tribune correspondent, and template a people making thc same 'his gox'crnment would tell 1hi With liver at template a people.........._ _ people to show a net j traitors was something nations had Mildred GHl.irs. who became known mistakc a second time, and so soon. Austrian government a POUlld mailV a no experience with, a through her broadcasts Jo our troops Trihmt .word meant later on. that the what the will have to make thc choice as to whether he or his bank account shall be anemic. Wave of Ranting By HAL O'FLAHERTY UirrrUr. Daily LETTERS TO THE TRIBUNE FORUM AH other issues connected wi'h come by the Ruwans. of them The nntj 1hr wit fortisn relations have out Russia the mo ii :hc pavt im- The dnxnt.ition of the commtu hcpf CMMS of m.ikinc JT.ICO  nd TcjTnrd "noi'maley." pulpit Jwve converged in That was in Ihr Kven dfyf upon Ihe Soviets and Ruvia weak, an bozU ft fiiiti'tt to Tbt Forum tJilor ct Tribttir itnlmnt lot 11 Coimtvuoit bt d'fii Cl ibt vhtib Jt- ti'fjt. vilt tr wilbbrtd Ftrlnmt tnl! f-r tr> vto ft to tkm itQtl ftJ. Thc Americans and British at Moscow and in the of the trca'y commission firmly rejected any Austrian treaty including this ___________________________________________________________________ ikind of open threat to Austria's in- Ijob. I had io Ml out several papers.'to say we were taxed to pay for'sreel my newsboy, as he is so "nd crHp'linR occu- jsit for inten'icws. more papers and thw-e in first place and pay premium lite and understanding. During she continues. i wailing jmt to get my own money pricx-s lor what is left. time J was conlinrti 10 rny sick bed. Austrian; like Chancellor It was lo be mine if I was Americans arc 1he forgotten our earner. -Tames Lydcn. would Minister Gruber 'out of work. Now I'm out of it I They want to sustain Europe in thc always bring the paper to the  11 leading? tl.e ciolvwl c Thnx who have the time for mtoa  1ic.nn r. will be in jxi-rif Whtllifr Die JJ.MUC Where Jeelmc nim -co high. 
                            

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