Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Oakland Tribune: Thursday, August 8, 1940 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Oakland Tribune (Newspaper) - August 8, 1940, Oakland, California                                WEATHER OAKLAND AND today, tonight and Friday, but over- cast night and morning; normal temperatures; moderate west wind. TEMPERAIUBES Maximum 70 Minimum 55 Full U.S. Weather Report, Fate 31 VOL. CXXXIII-NO. 39 EXCLUSIVE ASSOCIATED PRESS WIREPHOTO UNITED PRESS HOME EDITION 5c DAILY D Farley Quits Cabinet; F.R. Pens Regret President Declares Friendship 'Will Always Continue' HYDE PARK, N. Y., Aug. (IP) A. Farley resigned as post- master general today. His resigna- tion, to become effective August 31, was accepted by President Roose- velt in a letter in which he de- claired thejr friendship would "al- ways continue." The letter was dictated shortly a scheduled conference with Secretaries Wallace and Hopkins The President said he accepted the resignation with "real wished Farley success in private business and praised his adminis- tration of the Postoffice Depart- ment. "All of us in the the President wrote, "will miss you deeply; we count on seeing you often, I especially count on this after all of our years of close per- sonal association. Our friendship will always continue." Among reports of Farley's future activities is one that he would head a syndicate in purchasing the New York Yankee baseball property. Farley, a political ally of the Chief Executive of many years' standing, said in his letter of resig- nation as postmaster general, dated yesterday, that he, too, felt sincere regret at taking the step, listed ac- complishments of the postal service, and added: flfe "During my lifetime I shall cherish associations and friendships which I have made while serving as postmaster general, both in the postal service and in other depart- ments and agencies of the Federal Government. 'I know that it will please you to learn that I have made definite ar- rangements for my future in private SKY MYSTERY OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA, THURSDAY, AUGUST 8, 1940 lOc SUNDAY 32 PAGES business where very happy." I know I shall be U.S., Russia Seeking Accord, Says Welles WASHINGTON, Aug. Sumner Welles, acting secretary of State, indicated today the United States and Soviet Russia are seek- ring a general improvement in their relations. Commenting on his long confer- ence yesterday with Soviet Ambas- sador Constantine A Oumansky, IwWelles said they discussed many Questions bearing on relations be- tween the two countries with a friendly and constructive attitude shown by both sides. Welles declined to comment, how- ever, on Tokyo press reports that American Ambassador Joseph C. Grew had asked the Japanese Gov- ernifetit to clarify position gardlng French Indo-China. RFC Will Finance Airplane Factories WASHINGTON, Aug. Jesse Jones, Federal Loan adminis- trator, told the House Banking Committee today the Reconstruction Finance Corporation had agreed recently to finance construction of "half a dozen" new aircraft fac- tories to cost between and 39 Dead, Hundreds Hurt in Rome Blast ROME, Aug. explo- sions in the Tiatenza munitions fac- tory near Genoa, killed 39 workers and injilted several hundred today. Barracks near the factory were seri- ously damaged. Rosemary air stew- ardess, says a mysterious assailant "slugged" her last night. A.P. Wirephoio. Beaten on Head, Says Air Hostess Assailant Demands Key to Baggage Room, Avers Injured Girl NASHVILLE, Tenn., Aug. (ffl American Airlines officials today quoted Stewardess Rosemary Grif fith, 24, as saying she was hit on the head by an unknown person who demanded the key to the bag- gage compartment of a transcon' tinental sky sleeper as the plane neared Nashville last night. The stewardess' story, as given out by Paul Stanley, Nashville sales manager for the airlines, said she was leaning over in the corner 01 the ladies' lounge when some man whispered into her ear "give the key. Give me the key or I will slug you." Then Stanley said, the stewardess said she was felled by a blow on the head and that as she lay on the floor she managed to swallow the key. An X-ray photograph showed that Miss Griffith had swallowed the small key to the ship's baggage com- partment. She also had bruises on the head and body. City Sales Manager Paul Stanley of American Air Lines interviewed the girl this morning in company with attending physicians but de- clined to make any statement for publication or to to interview her. allow reporters Examination of the mail compart- ment of the plane shewed its con- tents had not been tampered with. Nazis Move to Put Paris Back to Work Aug. unemployment in the Paris its popu- lation now is only half of normal- led German authorities today to recommend an immediate public works program and the opening of all business establishments, whether their proprietors have returned or not. Ten francs (less than 20 cents) dally as a dole for the jobless is not enough, they said, and declared the remedy depends on the French Gov- ernment. US. May Seize French Funds For War Debt Morgenthau Reveals Plan to Take Over Assets in This Country WASHINGTON, Aug. Secretary Morgenthau disclosed to day that the United States is eon sidering the possibility of takin World War debt payments out frozen French funds in this country When the subject of war debt was raised at his press conferenc the Treasury chief said that befor French funds are released he want to see "what happens to Amer can investments and debts ove there." The Treasury head has referrei many times to the possibility of ofi setting American business and othe losses in the invaded European countries against the funds of thos countries being held here, but for merly he had given no reply to in quiries about World War indebted ness. France alone owes this countrj about from the las war. Asked whether the freezing regu lations, imposed upon the funds be longing to invaded Nations and their peoples, also applied to Ger many, Morgenthau replied: "No, any amount of money cai be sent to Germany, and there ii nothing we can do about it. It's silly, but we are at peace with Ger many and cannot do anything abou its funds." A reporter remarked that this country also was' at peace with France but' had frozen her funds Morgenthau explained that what hi meant was that freezing orders ap plied' only to invaded countries rather than ones at war, because when a country was invaded a ques tion arose whether its citizens tried to get money from this country on their own initiative or under "duress" of the invaders. He gave no estimate of the frozen funds, which have been rumored to total several billion dollars. All the American funds of France, Belgium Holland, Luxembourg, Denmark and Norway have been tied up. Tree Branch Crashes Into Tent; Youth Dies SAN JOSE, Aug. tower- ing oak under which 17-year-olc Robert Madrigal pitched his tenl claimed his life today. As he slept, a huge, gnarled limb crashed downward through the tent and pinned him in bed. Friends lelped to free him. He was taken to the Santa Clara County Hospital. There he appeared uninjured, but physicians decided to hold him for observation. Suddenly he lapsed nto a coma and died. The impact of the limb had inflicted internal injuries. The accident occurred on a ranch lear Almaden, 10 miles south of lere, where the boy's father, D. R. Madrigal, is the foreman. Royal Couple Receive Indian Welcome Rite LONDON, Aug. 8 g George VI and Queen Elizabeth were welcomed by Indian troops In Derbyshire today with an ancient ceremony called in which wo soldiers preferred a piece of jold and a piece of silver. By touch- ng the gold and silver with his right hand, the King showed he ac- cepted the gifts, and by raising his land without taking them, he signi- ied he remitted them to the givers. President Bids Nation to Pray for Peace HYDE PARK, N.Y., Aug. President Roosevelt has set aside Sunday, September 8, as a day of when Americans of every WHERE TO FIND IT Walter Llppmann: People are in no mood to be coddled and cajoled with soft words, and political lead- ers should address them with hon- est candor and 18. Subject Page Amusements, Plays 12 Gassified Advertising 7 Comic Strips 14 Crossword Puzzle 21 Editorial Features 18 Editorials and Columns 32 Exposition 10 Fashions 18 Financial 25 Geraldino 18 Knave 20 Marine News, Weather 31 Political News 15 Radio Schedules 21 Society and Clubs 19 Sports and Sportsmen 22 Theaters, Wood Soanes 12 Vital Statistics 31 fe- and denomination should ask God "to grant this land and to the troubled world" a righteous, endur- ing peace.'1 A presidential proclamation, dated yesterday and made public today at the President's Hudson Vaiiey estate, follows: "The American heritage of indi- vidual freedom, and of, government deriving its power from the con- sent of the governed, has from the time of the fathers of our'Republic been proudly transmitted to each succeeding generation, and to us of this generation has fallen the task of preserving it and transmitting it to the future. We are now engaged in a mighty effort to fortify that heritage. HUMBLY SYMPATHETIC "MindfSl of our duties in the family oi Nations, we Imve ored to prevent the outbreak and the spread of war, and we have raised our voices against Interna- tional injustice. As Americans and as lovers of freedom, ire are humbly sympathetic with those who are facing tribulation in lands across the seas. "When every succeeding day brings sad of suffering and disaster abroad, we are especially conscious of the divine power and of our dependence upon God's merciful guidance. "With this consciousness In our hearts, it is seemly we should, at a MUM like thto, pray to Almighty 004 for Hto try and for the establishment of a just and permanent peace among all the of the world. DAY OF PRAYER "Now, therefore, I, Franklin D. Rnmevelt, President of the United States of America, do hereby set aside Sunday, September 8, 1940, as a day of prayer; and I urge the people of the United States, of all creeds and denominations, to pray on that day, In their churches or at their homes, on the high seas or wherever they may be, beseeching the Ruler of the universe to bless our Republic, to make us reverently grateful for our heritage and firm in its defense, and to grant to this land and the troubled world a right- eous, enduring peace. "In witness whereof, I have here- unto get my hand and caused the sea! of TJrllf'vf fca to be affixed. "Done, at the city of Washington (his 7th day of August, in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and forty, and of the independence of the United States of America the one hundred and sixty-fifth. "FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT." 87 Planes Down in Channel Battle; Senate Passes Militia 'Draft' Bi Married Men May Quit Guard in 20 Days; Knox Seeks to Extend Sea Service WASHINGTON, Aug. Senate passed and sent to the House today legislation empowering President Roosevelt to order the National Guard -and Army reserves to active military duty for a period of 12 months. WASHINGTON, Aug. Senate voted unani- mously today to permit members of the National Guard and Army reserves, who have dependent wives or children, to Representative Dies WASHINGTON, Aug. 8. Representative Ga.) died W. Ben G i b b s Naval Hospital t night following stroke. He wtt II TWS oM, and tervinf torn M CMtrm resign within 20 days afte: enactment of legislation mak ing them subject to active duty. The proposal was made Senator Pittman (D., Nev.) anc adopted by unanimous consen when Chairman Sheppard (D Tex.) of the Senate Military Com mittee said he had no objection. Yesterday the chamber defeatei an amendment which would hav permitted any guardsman or re serve member to resign within 2 days. Under Pittman's amendment thi privilege of resigning would not b extended to men with sources of in come other than wages and salaries WOULD HOLD MEN Secretary Knox asked Congress :oday for authority to hold future tfaval and Marine Corps enlistee men in service indefinitely tfi war or "declared emergencies.' He stated the request in a lette to Speaker Bankhead of the House It was the latest move of a serie designed to strengthen the man power resources of the armec lorces for any emergency. The new legislation, proposed by Knox would apply only to those men who enlisted in the naval service including the Marine Corps, afte the enactment of the measure. ONLY FOR EMERGENCY The legislation would provide tha men so held must be dischargee within six months after end of th war or the emergency. Present law permits involuntary extension of enlistments only in ime of war. Naval and Marine Corps enlistments range from 2 to 1 years. In another communication to Con- ress, Herbert E. Gaston, acting Treasury secretary, asked legislation uthorizing the secretary of the Treasury to call retired commis- ioned and warrant officers of the Coast Guard to active duty in times f National emergency when the oast Guard is not operating as a art of the Navy. AMENDMENT FAILS The amendment to give guards- men and reserves 20 days after the ill's passage in which they could urn in their uniforms, failed yes- :rday, 47 to 36. It was offered by enator Danaher (R., who ontended that many men had en- sted in the belief that they would ot be called to duty putside their wn States unless Congress declared Administration senators, oppos- ng the amendment, argued that the uardsmen had enlisted to serve the ation in any emergency and bould not be permitted to quit at time when they were needed. 'OT CLEAR TEST Neither side, however, acknowl- dged the vote as a clearcut test I sentiment on the main con- h e t h e r conscription lould be ordered to supplement he militia or whether voluntary rmy enlistments should be sought, nti-conscription leaders, supported anaher's proposal. As soon as the guard bill Is acted pon, the Senate will take up the urke-Wadsworth conscription easure. A closely-knit group of senators met yesterday in the office f Senator Norris (Ind., to an for a "'lull debate, no compro- mise fight" against the legislation. "I hope that there will be the laximum number of aid Senator Nye (R., one f the foes, but he added that did "not at all" mean a filibuster. NO COMFROMISE Possibility of a compromise, Nye said, was not discussed. The bill as approved by the Senate Military Committee would require registra- tion of all men from 21 to 30, in< elusive, followed by a draft for a year's training. The conscription bill probably will nottcome up In the House until the Senate has acted, because Military Committee is going to re- open its hearings. Among the new witnesses will be General John J. Pershing, an advocate of compul- sory cnnriro, and Harry Page 2, Cel. t Japan Nears Indies Drive Push Reported Set To Start 48 Hours After Britain Invasion SHANGHAI, Aug. 8.-Japan was reported tonight to be hastening preparations for a lightning drive in the direction of French Indo- China and The Netherlands East Indies. Trustworthy foreign sources pre- dicted that Japan's big southward push would be geared to Germany's blitzkrieg machinery, now tuning up for threatened invasion of the British Isles, and would start within 48 hours after the Germans. Such timing would take advan- tage of diversion of British atten- tion to home defense. Britain stands as the only belligerent defender of the East Indies and Indo-China, ter- ritory of the German-vanquished Netherlands and France. If Adolf Hitler fails to move, 1 is believed the Japanese will pro ceed more slowly and cautiously but further efforts to extend Jap- anese influence are regarded as in- evitable. WARSHIPS Premature MOVE reports of imminent Japanese action in past weeks have seen traced to movements of war- ships and transports between For- mosa and Hainan, islands off the southeastern and southern China coasts, likely springboards for hrusts against India-China and the Dutch East Indies. In Tokyo, 126 of the Japanese )iet's 466 members adopted a reso- ution urging the Government to ake "all available and effective measures to drive British influence rom East Asia." Gen. Issaku Nishihara, head of a Japanese economic mission, was reported flying back to Hanoi, Trench Indo-China, after consulta- ion with Premier Prince Fumi- maro Konoye in Tokyo for con- inuation of economic negotiations. BREATHING SPELL' The prospective return of the ne- gotiator was considered in Hanoi as ignaling a "breathing spell" and a triumph of diplomacy over force." A stiffening of resistance to Jap- nese wishes appeared in the an- nouncement of a decision to reopen ranslt routes through Indo-China or Chinese One explanation in Japan was hat the Vichy Government, with Berlin's approval, favored putting brake on the Japanese. One informant raised the possi- illty that Hitler desired to pre- crve all the bargaining advantages e now holds, in favor of an ulti- mate broader settlement with Japan irrhaps embracing Batavia in the Dutch East Indies. New Ztolond Colls MenoH9to45 WELLINGTON, New Zealand, Aug. 8. The Government is- sued a proclamation today for en- rollment of general reserve man- power which will be liable to com- pulsory National service. Minister of National Service Semple announced the first division of the reserve, will compriK tingle men between the MCI of and are inglish Quix Russian, Ex-Embassy LONDON, Aug. 8. Tyler :ent, former employee of the United "tates Embassy, and Anna Wolkoff, -Cauffful RiiEsisn were questioned by the investigating mag- istrate in Bow Street police station today as secret were re- sumed on charges against them under the official secrets act. After an hour and a half hearing, the court clerk said the case had been adjourned until meeting of a special court August 19. ITALY Nazi, 34 B AFRICA 12 HAILS 3 Last note: Eeports frorr in details, indicat ROME, Aug. Italian of the battle for Britain cupation of Zeila, westernmost today. London claime in British Somaliland, is the claimed 34 British plan< step in a move by the Italians 12 ships sunk in thi join British and French night. with Italian Somaliland in the can offensive now under way, Aug. Pi high Fascist authority today. (British sources in London said today that Britain might give Offer a "cheap victory" In British land by withdrawing her forces from desert wastes considered not worth defending.) The capture of Zeila was described officially as of great Tree' India gic Zeila was taken after a three-day march from Ethiopia, SO miles Seeks War (The British announced loss of Zeila but Bombay LED BY Cool to Proposal An authoritative Fascist announced occupation of Zeila been carried out by Italian India, Aug. troops from Ethiopia under close to the India National mand of the Duke of Aosta, indicated today that it of be impossible to cooperate Capture of this port, just the British war effort despite of Jibuti, port in French concessions by Britain toward was declared by Italians here to goal of dominion status. the first step in French and British Somaliland Aug. India was Italian East "free and equal JJartner- Attainment of this goal would in the British commonwealth Italy a solid block of territory as Britain sought to unify a 2500-mile continuous coastline greatest possession of her em- the Red Sea, the Gulf of Aden for an amassing of manpower the Indian wealth against Germany, and It also would provide the latter now driving for an naval bases at Jibuti, Zeila into the Indian Ocean. Berbera, facing THAN DOMINION base at Aden, less than 200 miles across 'Jie Gulf of Aden. The Italian communique today said their armored columns, accompanied by bombing planes, werj well advanced on the way to Bet-bera, having occupied Oadweina on Tuesday, as well as pledge, announced by L. S. Amery, British secretary of State for India, in the House of Commons, was authoritatively interpreted Offering an "even broader" status than that of dominion, which is enjoyed by Canada, Australia and South Africa. Post-war dominion LAND for India was proposed by The Italian communique Government last October. nothing of land operations similar statement was made Bardia, where the British by Lord Linlithgow, said the Italians were in India. For an apparent offensive "sympathy" was expressed Egypt along the Indian insistence that the new should be framed by Destruction of four British and ready "assent" was an- bombed on the ground to organization, after the Wajir, Kenya Colony, and the of a body representing the shot down in an air fight also elements in Indian life to devise a new con- The said two out of a convoy of five being ISSUED corted by a British warship in the Esoieru Mediterranean were damaged seriously by aerial invitation to Indian leaders to join the Governor Generafs Executive Council and establish- of a war advisory council Italian would contain representatives of the Indian States also was Bate Raided by The Government statement CAIRO, Egypt, Aug. declared its hope that sat- Royal Air Force Issued the of Indian Nationalist as- communique would lead to a greater "The Italian East Africa of Indian wealth and marine base at Miassaua was to Britain's war effort. by R.A.F. bombers August 6 unstinted Indian aid, Britain August 7. Reports indicate be in a position to assemble lils were registered on a naval manpower to smother sel, the quay and one expansion in the Mediter- All our aircraft returned and Red Sea areas, and at "During another rail, same time offer a check to a were damaged. All our aircraft Japan in the other di- urncd safely. Enemy fighters proached Malta yesterday, repeating the Government's urned back before our could engage Page 2, Col. 6 German planes were destroyed in attacks on British convoys in the English Chan- nel today, the British offi- cially announced. An Admiralty-Air Ministry communique said it was confirmed that at least 53 German planes were shot down, and 16 British fighter pilots were missing after repeated onslaughts by the German air force at a convoy along, the southeast coast. The British said one German speed- boat was sunk and another damaged, but admitted loss of three coastal vessels and damage to several others in attacks by the Nazi torpedo- shooting boats and bombers. KIEL BOMBED Britain struck at the big German, naval base of Kiel, off the North Sea coast last night, dumping bombs on the dockyards and starting fires and explosions. The French port of Cherbourg also was attacked in daylight by the British. All lights Holtenau in on the airdrome at Northwest Germany, were put out after a salve of bombs was dropped, the Air Ministry said. At Hasum, another airdrome near Kiel, bombs were dropped on the landing ground. The Admiralty announced that British planes destroyed a gasoline storage depot five miles south of Bergen, In German-occupied Nor- way. Bombs were dropped over other sections of England, apparently by lone planes. No particular damage was reported. The day's air activity followed night of raids on English, Welsh and Scottish points. LEAFLETS AGAIN containing from Adolf Hitler's "peace or destruction" ultimatum were dropped again. In the night raids, the Government announced, casualties were "very though some women walking on a country road were seriously Injured. Damage was slight except in one town in Northeast England where "a sanatorium and shop prop- erty suffered considerably." (A United Press dispatch la'd MO children from homes in indj.iVial areas narrowly escaped death when two bombs dropped go close to the which they all windows were sanatorium in sleeping, that shattered and doors blown in.) Two hundred and fifty-eight civilians were killed and 321 injured seriously during air raids on Britain during the month of July, It reported today in a written answer o a House of Commons question. German Fliers Mint Harbors of England BERLIN, Aug. The man high command announced In a special bulletin today that 34 Brlt- sh planes had been shot down and Continued Page t, I RUMANIA MUST MAKE SACRIFICE TO SAVE PEACE IN BALKANS, PREMIER TELLS NATION Ship Beached in N.Y. Afar Myitery NSW YORK, Aut. Norwegian freighter Llsta, bound lor England with a heavy geneial cargo, was beached in the lower harbor today after a mysterious fire broke out in her engine room. The ship was an inferno when her crew of 34 abandoned her near West Bank Light Submarine Sunk LONDON, Aug. Ad- miralty announced tonight that the British submarine Oswald, which had been operating In the Mediter- ranean, considered loft (The Italian high oormiMnd amounted the ilnkmn of tiw OtwtM write DUKE OF WINDSOR LANDS IN BERMUDA HAMILTON, Bermuda, Auf. Duke and Duchess of Windsor arrived here today from Lisbon, Portugal, en route to the Bahamas where the Duke will as- sume the post of Governor. The American export liner Ex- caliber on which they were pas- tenners anchored off this port early jn the afternoon. Thousands Jincu the shores and the freshly scrubbed coral-paved couple. to greet the The arrived at the jetty almost exactly at the scheduled hour, p.m., and stepped ashore from a barge as cheers arose from the throng of about 3300 which crowded the Royal Yacht Club lawn. The Duke came ashore first, fol- lowed by American born He greeted first by Maj. Gen, Kirwan Bernard, Governor of Atrmutft, MtWK then toy Haav Conference Opens on Dobrujo Dispute; Bucharest- Hopes to Achieve Compromise BUCHAREST, Rumania, Aug. Ion Gigurtu told his people today that Rumania would have to make territorial to preserve peace in southeastern Europe. Rumania, opening territorial nego- tiations with Bulgaria at Craiova, hoped to hold her neighbor's claims on the province of Dobruja to a minimum by arguing that a perma- nent peace can be attained only on both sides. Raoul Bossy, special Rumanian delegate to Hungary, expected to return today from Budapest with Hungarian for settlement of the dispute over the Romanian Province of Transylvania. (In Budapect, a high authority re- ported that Hungarian Premier Count Pal Teleky informed Bossy thit Hungary would agree to noth- ing than teuton of 7J per cent of (Official The pro-Nazi government mier Ion Gigurtu promulgated t new law splitting 7MyM into three Those who saw active service 1W Rumania, and their   Those in regions annexed after ttt World War. (3) Those of ttrt kingdom who did not service. Those of the first clan now ing public office may retain hut thprp will no new ap- pointments. Those of the two otMV clanes may not hold public f engage in liaiton with the public and are barred from No Jew may own rural; those now holding men fc lorn them to the GovtriMMMtlftt   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication