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   Oakland Tribune (Newspaper) - February 26, 1940, Oakland, California                                OAKLAND TRIBUNE, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 26. 1940 P.-T.A. to Fete Founders' Day District President To Be Honored at Son Leandro Program SAN LEANDRO, Feb. units of all San Lenntiro schools will hold a joint Founders' Day rpeetine tomorrow at 2 p.m. in the high school auditorium. They will have as their guest of honor Mrs. G. W. Luhr, presi- dent of the 28th District, California Congress of Parents and Teachers. Life memoersnip auaicii wall be given out by Mr.s. Calder Innes, general chairman, assisted by Mrs. Lloyd Richards, Mrs. Arnold Fisher, Mrs. Provie Gigli and Mrs. R. D. fngraham. Names of the recipients were not revealed. Entertainment will include vocal selections by Mrs. A. A. Newman, 28th district Founders Day chair- man; humorous readings by Mrs. George Farmer, a "songalogue" by Mrs. Ray W. Dougherty and num- bers by the High School Senior Glee Club. Tea will be served after the meet- ing under the direction of the fol- lowing unit presidents: Mrs. Harry Von Arx. Mrs. Oswald Rehm, Mrs. Albert Rosenga. Mrs. H D. Skil- ling and Mrs. William G. Lee Jr. Teacher to Give Address on Finland EMERYVILLE, Feb. i s s Anna Graene Fraser, principal of Woodrow Wilson High School and dean of girls in the Oakland School Department, will speak on "Hail Finland" at a meeting of the Em- eryville Industries' Association at noon tomorrow at Veterans Memo- rial Building. Miss Fraser, who has made five trips to Finland to study conditions and problems of the peo- ple, will describe the immediate situation facing the Finnish Repub- lic in its struggle with Russia. Pres- ident A. A. Charonnat will conduct the meeting. Traveler to Address Red Men's Lodge Dan Stetson of Capwell's Travel Bureau, who recently returned from a European tour, will tell of his ex- periences overseas at the meeting of Tecumseh Tribe No. 62, Improved Order of Red Men. tomorrow eve- ning in Knights of Pythias 12lh and Alice Streets Sachem Rod E. Petersen will be in charge. BLIND CHAMPION GIVEN CUP Social Evil Is Sam Bean oi Alameda has net seen for 30 years, but he was awarded the silver trophy as Alameda's best chess player today by Mrs. Olive photo. Blind, Deaf Alamedan Awarded Trophy as Chess Champion High Blood Pressure Kidney, Bladder Sufferers- Here's Help Anyone suffering from High Blood Pres- Hinlpned Stroke, Kidney MIul JMauuei ._ from la urged to try the especially 9 palliate UTONA. Doctors report many have found UTONA tjrniKa real help. Purely vegetable. Contains no oplntrs or harmful d'-ui'S Have vourPnrtorrliPck tiT'so symp- toms, Dizziness. Talntins Spplla. Numbness. Getting Up K Khts. Pn-1 'tits V.'e TT-int to prove the value of UTON'A to younMf to- day. Toumufcl be entirely BaiiOrd L'TON'A you cryour money back la guaranteed. Sold at all OWL DRUG STORES ALAMEDA, Feb. Bean, 43, 1807 Santa Clara Avenue, blind and deaf for 30 years, was today given the silver loving cup which is awarded Alameda's best chess player. A rock thrown by a school mate at 14, cost one of Bean's eyes, an in- fection shortly after took the other and attacked the auditory robbing him of his hearing also. This twin affliction would have downed many another, but Bean is cheerful, keeps busy endeavoring to make his own living by stringing tennis rack- ets, repairing chairs and making brooms. He has two sons in school, keeps in touch with the world by reading Braille books and magazines. He is a keen conversationalist, hav- ing kept his tone inflections remark- ably well for one who has not heard speech for 30 years. He "hears" by having words and whole sentences spelled out on the Me Vionrto whirh 3TP highly Soothe, and help heal, chafings and rashes of external origin. sensitive and Bean usually devines a sentence from the first few words before his friends have had time to write it on his hand with their fin- gers. Bean was the proudest man in Al- arreda today, when given the silver trophy donated by W. J. Heisler, pharmacist, by Mrs. Olive Nagel recreation department aid and pas' president of the Alameda Chess Club. 'Common Sense' Held Need for Teachers BERKELEY, Feb. 26. tion of "common sense" is an im- portant attribute for the. modern teacher, according to George J Burkhard, vice-principal and heac of the commercial department of Berkeley High School, in an ad- dress before Armstrong College students. "It is important to think of teach- ing as a proieasion anu IIUL us a Burkhard said. "The teacher faces the problem of having chil- dren from all types of homes and many who need heip and encoui- agement in order to succeed. This requires human understanding, good knowledge of child psychol- ogy and the application of com- mon-sense methods Pastor's Subject To Be Honored Chest Leaders NAVAL AIR BASE CONCRETE FLOORS LAID State Marriage Law Upheld; Rediscovery Of Christ Is Told "Preaching on sin is not as popular as it used to be. We nave a polite society now, and it is not very fash- ionable to talk about our said Dr. Clarence HemeiiDctcn, piediluuj; at the First Congregational Church, yesterday, on the subject "Forgive US." Continuing, Dr. Reidenbach said: religion that we can be forgiven and can take a fresh start. God is always ready to forgive, and that in itself ias its emotional power to stir us up to improve ourselves." LAW DEFENDED "The California marriage law de- serves the support of enlightened said the Rev. Sumner Wal- lers, rector, at Christ Episcopal Church, Alameda, preaching on the :heme "Reverently, Discreetly, Ad- visedly." "There should be no repeal of the provision for the lapse of several days between applying for the license and the marriage said the rector, "nor should there be the removal of the blood test re- quirement." Speaking on the topic, "The Re- discovery of Dr. Psul Rea- gor, pastor of the First Christian Church, said in part: "For long centuries the church concentrated its attention upon the teachings of Paul, and the doctrines which had evolved therefrom. Be- ginning a little over a hundred years ago the attention of the church was directed to the rediscovery of the historic character of Jesus of Naza- reth. Men went back into Palestine and restored the circumstances and the environment in which he lived, and in which his ministry was con- ducted. They rediscovered the his- torical setting in which this historic figure His appearance in this world and from which the Christian religion took its start." BOOK REVIEWED Dr. Clarence Reed at the First Unitarian Church spoke yesterday on "Sholem Asch's "The Nazarene.'" He said in part: "This book is more than a novel. It has a historical background whicb is the result of years of historical research and creative thought "When a person finishes reading this book he unconsciously thinks of Jesus as the greatest of the Jewish prophets. He steers clear of theo- logical controversies which have been the curse of the Christian church for nearly two thousand years." REIDENBACH SPEAKS Rev. Reidenbach spoke at a joint meeting of leaders of his pastorate of Temple Sinai in the synagogue Jast weeK-enu, caus- ing the local observance of National Brotherhood Week. "Unity begins at he said, "and during the present crisis m j Charles L. Smith. WITH 'HORSE SENSE' AND ON SCHEDULE By JACK BURROUGHS The sight of that concrete cement- finished floor they are putting in the assemblage and repair shops at the Naval Air Station in Ala- meda stirred up an old recollection in a cobweb-festooned corner of my cranium today. It brought back. monlv called horse senie. The way I found out about this deficiency on my part was this: Back in the days when wooden sidewalks began to disappear in favor of the cement variety and Ail but Two of Drive Heads in 17 Years to Attend Birthday Fete Civic leaders who have served as presidents and campaign chair-lwlth painful vividness, memories men of the Community Chest will: of the day I discovered that I had be honored tonight at the than my quota of what is com- 17th anniversary ainnei ai iliu Oakland. All of the men who have occu- pied the presidency since the chest's ;wo of the campaign chairmen will e present at the affair. The presidents include W. W. Garthwaite, who served from 1923 to 1927; Joseph R. Knowland, 1928 to 1932; Charles P. Howard, 1933 to 1937, and Alfred J. Lundberg, 1938 to date. The campaign chairmen are Wil- liam Harold Oliver, 1924; Ralph T. Fisher, 1925-'26; R. A. Leet, 1927-'28; Charles P. Howard, 1929-30; Lew Galbraith, 1933; Donald B. Rice, 1934-'35; Dr. Ben W. Black, 1936; A. T. Shine, 1937; Rabbi William F. Stern, 1938-'39, and William F. Knowland, 1940. GIVENS IN EAST ward steadily, a coat having i ski observation scout as well H been virtually finished on the in-1 torpedo-bombers, trainers and tnanj 1 other types. The Army group in- cludes Boeing and Douglas bombers, attack, pursuit and other ships. He HOW YOU CAN GET IF YOU CAN PAY BACK A MONTH No or guarantors needed No credit questions asked of friends or Prompt, private service. If you need a loan you are invited to visit the Household Finance office just recently opened. Here you can get cash quickly and simply, if you can make the monthly payments shown below. You may repay your loan in the size installments you prefer. Large payments will pay up your loan quickly. You fits your own needs and your own income. Choose your own payment plan Suppose you need 5100 and can conveniently repay S9.77 a month. The table shows that your installments will repay a loan from Household Finance in full in twlve months. Or, if you wish smaller payments, as little as S5.61 a month for twenty-four months willalso repay loan. Find the amount of cash you need in the first column of the table. Then read across, picking cut tr1- navment that you can conveniently make out of your regular monthly income. Sooner you repay your loan the less it costs Note, in the last column of the table, that you may make the size payments you wish. See also that the sooner you repay, the less your loan costs. Four in- stallments of each, for in- stance, will repay a loan in full. The cost in this case is only (All payments shown in the table include the charges. You pay nothing more.) Simple to borrow YOU PAY BACK EACH All 30 lo banrj mlf 12 months or 3.37 i WE GUARANTEE the total amount figured by uimR this table to be the lull you will pay, when are made on schedule. You will pay leas if you pay loan ahead of time since you pay charges only for the actual time you have the Payments are calculated at the rate of J month on that part of the balance atxneSlGO I i Finance loan is acquaint us with your needs. We require no salary or wage assignment, no stocks or bonds. (Loans are made on per- sonal property.) No questions regarding your credit are asked of fnends or relatives. And you don't have to ask friends or fel- low-workers to sign the loan pa- pers with you. You get your loan promptly, privately and without embarrassment. Fair treatment Last year Household Finance made over loans to men and women m cities from coast to coast. Many of these people could tell you that Household shows every consideration to the borrower faced with sickness or unemployment while paying on a loan. Last year Household fore- closed on only one chattel mort- gage for each an action taken then only as pro- tection against fraud. If a loan can help you, we urge you to study the loan and pay- ment table carefully. See how you can repay the loan you need with only a part of your pay check. Then phone or visit us today. You will be under no ob- ligation to borrow. "Doctor of Family Finances" HOUSEHOLD FINANCE TO tsoo 1419 Broadway, 707 Broadway Building OAKLAND H. L. Patterson, Manager Phone: HIgate 7051 Francisco: 833 Market St., 3rd Floor fa Crooki, Manager Phone: EXbrook 8731 ntt cinftaint phtni or mil, mail this HOUShHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION Plfase send me (without obligation) a copy of your booklet: "How to Get a Loan." ..Slalt.......___ J Willard E. Givens, chairman in 1931 and 1932, is now in Washing- ton, D. C. The first drive, in 1923, was led by the late J. Cal Ewing. Fifty-five thousand persons have voluntary service to the community under these men, ac- cording to Morris JPenter, who will 36 chairman at tonight's affair. Since the chest's inception, Penter said today, a total of per- sons have demonstrated the Amer- ican way of being a good neighbor by contributing to the central fund which finances 44 private health and social welfare agencies. AGENT OF UNITY "Those who value unity as against class divisions back the unifying forces of the Community Penter said. "Those who help fill the chest go far toward preserving America's greatest nity solidarity and citizen respon- sibility." Tonight's entertainment of the evening will include songs by the Saturday Morning Choir led by Norman E. Pillsbury. The student singers represent eight high schools in the Oakland public school system as well as Merritt Business and Central Trades Schools. EDUCATOR TO SPEAK Arnold Perstein, associate profes- sor of public speaking at the Uni- sity of California, will make the address of the evening upon the topic "The Almost Perfect State.' Alfred J. Lundberg, chest presi- dent, will preside over a short busi- ness meeting to select nine new di- rectors to replace the following whose terms have expired: Dr. Bern W. BlacK, U. zi. .rjsuin-i, Galbraith. R. A. Leet, A. J. Lund- berg, William Harold Oliver, Louis Scheeline, Bernard Silverstein and a board walk in front of your place, there was one thing that puzzled me more than any other. I could not understand why they poured the cement in alternate sections, leaving the sections in between empty, and then went back and filled in the intervening spaces when the slabs already poured and finished had set. The mystery bothered me day and night for a long time, so to avoid brain fever, I finally asked a friend of mine about it. This friend, although he was a year younger than I, had enough horse sense to supply an entire cavalry troops. HE WAS ASTONISHED He was gieatly astonished when terior. General Superintendent Hughes estimated that the work would be completed by the middle of May. within contract time. AVIATION ART GALLERY A wall of the Airport Inn res- taurant at Oakland Municipal Air- port has blossomed out as a minia- ture 
                            

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