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Oakland Tribune: Monday, July 4, 1932 - Page 13

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   Oakland Tribune (Newspaper) - July 4, 1932, Oakland, California                                CRY ON HER. SHOULDER. ExcUulv CowolUWed Press IN THIS SECTION VITAL STATISTICS VOL. CXVII- OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA, MONDAY, JULY 4, 1932 13 NO. 4 Thousands Jam Community For Final Events; Results Of Yesterday Races Listed PLEASANTOX, July a full card of racing events, nnd with horse exhibitions between races, the Plcasanton Junior Chamber of Commerce's first "Glorify the Horso" three days' show today is to swing to a smashing climax. It was preceded by a July 4 parade this morning, was voted the finest thing of its kind yet attempted locally, the mile- long paiade, and the hundreds of floats, costumed rulers and walk- ing exhibits, giving .splendid in- terest and color to the procession, sponsors t.aid. The town is jammed with visi- tors, including thousands from Eastbay cities, all of whom are en- joying to the full the program which the day is providing. 1VIXNEKS ARE TOLD In yesterday's racing and other events, staged before a inrge crowd of townspeople, district residents end visitors from a distance, re- sults were as follows: Open jumping Paddy, Major II. S. Kelsev, Oakland; I'al, Mabel Davies, Oakland: 3, Co-op, Cornelia Ciess, Mills Col- lego Riding academy. middle noises 1, Nobility, Ch.ulotte B. Andei- (ton, Pleasanton: 2, Diana McDon- ald, Dr. E. R. Felton, Merced; 3, Wildfire, Mrs. Anderson. Three-gailed saddle horses 1. Little Gipsy Sweetheart, Mrs. An- derson; 2, Glen, Mibs Cress; 3, Sky- rocket, Mrs. I. Easton, Oakland. OPJiX JUMP CLASS Open jumping class, 15 1, Queen Lady, Roma Ferrsirio, PJeasanton; 2, Smoke, Ben York, Pleasanton; 3, Prince of Wales, William Colbert, Casllewood Coun- try club. Pleasure Duke, Major Kelbey; 2, Glenn, Miss Cress; 3. You Bet, Major Kolsoy. Three-gaited Pand and Pal, Miss Davies; 2, Duke and Cri <3u Guerre, Major Kelsey and Black Sheep Stock Farm, Palo Alto. Hunters 1, Crl du Guerre. Black Sheep Stock Farm: 2, Co-op, Miss Cress; 3, entry of Richard Monroe. Pleasure horses owned by local residents. It White Eagle, J. B. Lee; 2, Smokey, E. Eckert; 3, Sam, Dan Tehan. EXHIBITIONS GIVEN Special exhibitions of high school horses were given by Miss Davies, and Mrs. Anderson. Ben York ex- hibited his polo pony Forgiveness, and T. C. Boots, Mllpltas race- horse breeder, showed his string in a special running event. Judges were: Pleasure horses. Major Kelsey; jumpers end hunt- ers, Jack Sullivan, Cupertino; three and five-gaited horses, Will- lam E. Bone, San Jose. Ring- master was E. Grant, Pleasanton. Kin Shooting Laid to Man July La A'allcy, 40, stockman. Is held on an open charge at the Buttc county jail, and his brother Tom La Valley, la in an Oroville hospital expected to die, as the re- sult of a gunshot wound said to have been Inflicted by the brother held In Jail. The two are said to have become Involved In a family quarrel over their mother Saturday evening. There Is no hope that Tom La Valley will live, It was said at the sheriff's office. entire right 'elde was almost shot away by the ghoteun discharge which entered his body at close range. Filing of charges agalnet the brother awaits the outcome ot Tom La Valley's condition. La Valley, booked at the county jail, al- ready retained an attorney. Campus Paving Job Bids to Be Opened SAN JOSE, July for the proposed grading and raving job on the new .Tunipero Serra boulevard through the Stan- ford University campus at Palo Alto will be opened by the board ot supervisors of Santa Clara coun- ty at a meeting on July 11. Pians and Rpr-rlflf-aMon" been accepted from County Sur- veyor Robert B. Chandler, and several sealed bids have been re- ceived from contractors. The new boulevard will furnish a fourth arterial for traffic from the peninsula and southern Cali- fornia points, relieving congestion on the San Francisco highway, the Bay Shore highway and the Sky- line boulevard. RETURN FROM HAWAII The Misses Amelia and Mabel Stenzel of San Lorenzo, relumed recently from the Hawaiian islands, bringing with them a collection of curios. On the return journey they were presented with a grass skirt and war club by Pat Ward, son of the premier of New Zealand, a fellow passenger. Salary Cuts Ordered to Reduce Budget of Board IIAYWARD, July re- ductions of from 5 to 30 per cent to make possible a annual re- duction in the salary budget of soulliein Alameda county welfare board employees are to result from county supervisors' action in slashing budget estimates of county welfare organizations, it was an- nounced here today by Mrs. Lula- Boyd Stephens, executive secretary of the southern county board. B. AV. Burr of Hayward, presi- dent of the Alameda county wel- fare, council, who declared the supervisors' action makes impos- sible salary increases sought for 13 employees, declared the welfare workers will accept the pay slash necessitated by the budget reduc- tions. Some decrease in amounts spent for the relief of needy persons through the agency of the southern county board, Mrs. Stephens an- nounced today, is expected as a result of the opening of the apri- cot-picking season. Hayward Veterans Win in Contest for Membership ITAYAVARD, Julv post, A'elerans of Foreign Wars, and Iho local auxiliary unil todav hold two trojjhy cups, won at the recent state convention of the or- ganizations at Vallejo, for member- ship Increases. Commander Newman E. Nelson Of the V. F. W. post, who hended the veterans' delegation, received the cups for the post, awarded for the record membership Increase In the fifth district, both numerically and on a percentage basli. The mpmbfTNhlp Inrrp.ipp, nc couling to Robert Pomeroy, pos ofCiccr, was from 53 to 112 during the contest period, an Increase 0, 59 members, or more than 100 per cent. The auxiliary, under Mrs. Han nah Thompson, president, In cre.-.sed Its membership to more than BO during Its six months existence. A membership of more than 100 Is expected by the firs of the year. Complete Workshop Will Be Given to Boy Scouts PITTSBURG. July of the most complete workshops in the country will be avaliable for handicraft students at future sum- mer camps of the Berkeley-Contra Costa Boy ficouf council. Field Executive AV. R. AVhklden said to- day. During thp presont camp pprlod a specious log cabin has rrprt'vl hv and IjMge work benches will be set up on all four sides. Complete set? of woodworking, metnl and silver work and many other instruments will be in- rslallcd, according to Whidden, and the Scouts will be ahlp to undpr- Convicts Will Get From Beans CAN QUENTIN, Jnly Fourth" m t "escape" today for every convict. Escape from Ine inevitable neons that, day in day ont, form the mainstay of prison mcnn. Warden .Tame? B. Hollolian spread the big newi ihii mornrnc, and ordered chefs to cook holiday menn of pork arrd other wilh apnle and cream for ni All work i< nbandowd for the day. This were m fumt, turd (lie fWWfl fWfH H craft work both Inside and o-tslde the structure. Culling of timber and erection of the cabin wa? accomplished by Scouts working under the super- vision of R. 33. Boydstun nnd 3far- old Hrlkel. Showers, washstands and many other improvements Iinvp hpcn un- rtprtakpn bv thp bovs during the present period, AVhiddpn while undprhrush, fallen logs and limbs have bppn clpnrert from large sec- tions ot the- camp area. The campfire bowl has bppn enlarged and several new tiers of spats have been built. 16 WAT R Modesto and Turlock Agri- culturists lo Have Irriga- tion Well Into October MODESTO, July and Tin-lock agriculturists will be assured of ample irrigation water until as late as October, Neil M. watei pngirper for the Mo- desto irrigation district, said to- day. There is definitp assurance that it will be one of the longest sea- sons in the history of the munici- pal irrigation piojoct, officials said. Hiding that ranchers "can have water for as long as, they w.mt it." Last year an acute shortage be- an to develop as early as July. In addition to being a boon to igriculturists, the big water supply will mean m-uch levenue to tho Mo- desto and Turlock districts, from electric power generated at the hydro-electric plant at Don Pedro dam, which forms the storage basin for both systems, it was pointed out. Because of the 1031 shortage, it was necessary for the local district to purchase power wholesale early in thp fall to serve its consumers. The 14-mile long Don Pedro reservoir is now filled to over- flowing. Water is pouring over bpillwavs to a depth of more th.m a foot into the Tuolumne river be- low. The basin now contains 000 acre-feet, a total that will be increased to after the nine foot spillway gates arc closed. This will not be done until the peak of the runoff is passed, according to engineers. Council Changes Are Slated in San Jose SAN JOSE, Julv 4. A new member of the citv council will lake his seat and a new chaiiman will lake over the reins of the council when it meets to reorgan- ize itself for the coming teim tomorrow night. Richard French, local merchant, elected at the May elections, is the new councilman. tie- takes the place of D. M. Denegrl, councilman for 12 years, who did not suuk re- election because of being seriously ill and confined to his home for several months. Councilman A. M- Meyer will be- come council chairman, succeeding- Councilman W, L. Biebrach, who has held office two yeais. Councilman Joseph T. Brooks re-elected at the May primaries will be sworn in for another tern by City Clerk John J. Lynch meeting tomorrow night. Woman Defends Self In Divorce Action SAN RAFAEL, July Gwendolyn Hoff, 26, defended her- self In a losing divorce action in the superior court here, when her husband, Clarence JToff of San An- selmo, was granted the decree community property, and custodj of their two small children. Mrs. JJotf, now on piobnllon foi n bad check convlclion, entered a cross charge if oxtieme rruclU the on which Jfoff was granted the divorce. Airs, llotf wa-i found guilty of passing bad checks by Superior Judge Kdwari I. Butler, who yesterday heard th -------------------4-------------------- Schools of Oroville Report Large Gain OROVILLE, July record gain In average dnllv attendance of 474 In HIP Buttp county elempn- tary nnd (.econdary schools was disclosed today by J. E. Partridge, county superintendent. Klementnry schools gnlncrl 321 find the high schools 153 In at- tendance during the past year. Elemenl.iry school daily attend- ance was B323 and high school at- tendance- was 1080 for the past year. Committee to Help State Olive Pool Oroville, July of a committee ot olive grow- ers to assist locally In formation of a state olive pool is to be mndp by Glenn president of t Butte county farm bureau, follow- ing meeting of olive growers held Growers present gave a vote o confidence to the statewide com- mittee peeking to solve the oliv marketing problem and favored appointment of such ft committee Improvement Of Alameda County Stock Is Objective 'rogram lo Get Under Way Early in Fall; Will In- rlnrlc Study, Demonstration HAYAVARD, July stock campaign in southcin Uamcda county, directed primartlv oward cattle and sheep, Has boon tentatively launched with an all- lay tour and inspection by L. If. Rochford, livestock extension spe- cialist of the University of Cali- fornia, and Farm Adviser T. O. Morrison. The progiam will get actively iniler way early in the fall, and will include study of and instruc- ion in the more advanced meth- ods of breeding, lull selection, culling, pasturage, feeding, din- ease control, maiki'ting and other pluisos, the oCticials said It is piohable that the campaign not be directed entirely toward Vlamcda county, but may link Santa Clara and Contra Costa counties this area, in view of the mutual Intel est in the sub.leet, Morrison said. A series ot demonstrations and experiments are expected for the fall. Results of nil activities will je studied carefully and noted. The entire program will continue for at least one year and probably two, accoiding to the adviser. Cooperation and aid of stock- men ot southcin Al.imod.i county ire essential in the success of the educational ventuie, expected to materially raise the live-stock standard, Morrison pointed out. DISTWTIlS ESI MERGED, Julv R. Mcllcnrj, trrahiirer of tho Merced irrigation district, announced to- day that bond interest amounting to approximately has been paid out bv the utility on the total of which came due Julv 1. Funds to mnke up the balance are expected to be rccoiced on sec- ond installments of 3031-32 taxes, and from the sale ot power gen- erated hydrOPleclrically at Exche- quer dam. McTFenrv said the total Indebtedness probably will bo met by December. Coupons on the defaulting bonds will he registered with UIP district for later pajment. Virtually nil monpv that was available in the tr'easuiy when tho interest became due was paid on! to members ot the Bondholders' Protective Association and thp First National Bank of Merced, it was icportpd. MT, DIABL Sausalito Ready to Break 'Bottle-Neck SAUSALITO, July elimination of the Sausalito "bot- tle-neck" seemed aiiurcd today with the announcement that plans for the improvement of the main highway from the bay to Nrtpn sli-pet are being completed under thp direction of the clly councl highway cornmiltPe. Whpn these plans urn received by tho hlghwnv commission, re- alignment of the highway from Pine station to Olive street will be started. The commlfculon now has ft fund of avail- able for this purpose. It has neen agreed that as soon funds available the remain- Ing portion of road between Napa and Olive streets will ho recon- structed. The proposed new high- way will parallel the railroad eliminate the haz- ardous curves on the present route. New Prunedale Road Nearing Completion SALINAS. Julv on the new Prunednle-Rock.i road, ahort- cnlnK the San Franclsco-Sallnns const and eliminating th hazards ot thn tortuous Ran .Tunn grade, Is PipcctPd to be completed by July 35. This i-pport hni bcpn brought to Salinas by George Gould, chair man of the rhambpr of commerce highway commission. During a re CPnl survey of thp new highway hp said, ho was Informpd work- men that the job was progressing speedily. If completed by July pre- dicted, tho highway will greatly facilitate travel Into Salinas for (he California rodeo, July 20 and 24, Inclusive. Work of Building Fire Trails To Cut Hazards Arc Now Under Way; Oiled DAN'A'ILLE, July -I of Mt. Diablo state park have be- come, developed so rapidly (luting the short time it has been a unit of the California park system tint he meridian peak is being visited ,iy hundreds of motorists each month. Thp road's have been oiled lo ihe summit leading fiorn both nates, eleven new camping and picnic round areas have been cieated. spring water has been piped to many of thp camp sites and to (he lop of the mountain, a campaign under way to exterminate the rodents and thislle and poison oak are being eradicated at every turn. During the 14 months the moun- tain area has been under super- vision of Warden Henry L Blais- dell the number of has in- creased ten-fold, yet automobile accidents havp diminished. AAroi k of building fire trails around Ihe camp grounds so as lo minimize (he fire hazard caused by cigarelle smokers is now in progress. Since the park was taken over by the state, tho state highway mainlcnance crew in chaigo of Robert Wixson of Clock has been spending seveial days a month improving the roads. Approximately 20 miles of stale park roads were oiled in recent months, the work being done under contract by Tcichcrl Son, Sacramento firm, but supervised by the stale division of'highways, Warden Blaisdcll said. The park cosl borne iolnllv bv Alameda and Contra C'o.sta counties and the slale Boosting of State Scenic Assets Urged By Governor Development of Travel Held Aid to Trade. Employ- ment; Cooperation Asked National Guardsmen Preparing for Camp SAN JOSE, July than 300 San Jose National Guardsmen will entrain July 22 for the annua summer training camp at San Luis Obispo July 23 to August 7. Thi guardsmen who will bo among BOOI troops attending the camp, ar members of Companies F1 and H of the 150th Infantry. At cam they wJIl be under direct com mand of Major Louis J. Van Dal sem of this city. Among the off! cers will Lieut. Col. Clarence L Arftchpll of San Jose, cxecutlv officer ot the regiment. MODKRTO. July amp" Rolph ,li., in a letter to Vaughn D AVhitmorc, chairman of he St.imslaus county board of iipervisors, declared that develop- nent of California's tourist travel s a prime wnv to increase trade nrl emplojmpnt in a cooperative vay. The RoVPinnr urged counties to band tosothci to advcrsisp the state's scenic advantages, thus at- racting more visitors. "Our unemployed want 1obs, not loles." Rolph snid "Since incrcas- ng trade and employment can he bronchi about bv aggressive de- i-Plopment of our touiist travel, the aeeoinpli-jhing of this is some- thing to which our countv govein- nents should rightly give active cooperation." He described work ot the All- Year Cluh of Southern California in stimulating tourist travel as one of UIP most effective in the world. Tn this connection, e AVhitmor pointed out that tho San Jonquin A'allcy Tourist and Travel associa- tion, embracing 11 valley and Sierra counties, has joined with the All-Tear v.lub to develop tourist trade to the maximum this year. "I have been much impressed by the All-Year club's high caliber woik. because in addition to bring- ing money spenders, (hev have ef- fectively warned the wrong type from coming said the gov- ernor. "Our imported unemployed problem would have been much rho this past year, had it not been for their splendid help." Delegates Chosen by Red Men of Concord CONCORD, July 4. Wahoo tribe will be represented by a great trustee and four past sachems al the great council session of Red Men at Santa Rosa on August 16 it was learned today. Loxiis Pedri- zetti, one of the great trustees of the stale, nnd Past Sachems R. A Tyner, George Scares, Elmer Carl- son and Frank Costa, will attend from Concord. San Mateo County Marriages in Drop REDWOOD CITT, July Thirty-two fewer marriages were performed jn San Mateo county In June than was the case a year ago "Cupid" Elmore B. flinman re ported today. Only 84 marriage wore performed, compared to 11 a year ago. lompanion of Alleged Thief Beats Owner of Property; Victim Loses Two Fingers July i? hlimllv into the d.irk, TV. D. 'haddock, local rabbit fancier, lint two fingers from the hand of Vilham I toward Ball, 23, of aro, oarly Sunday morning, and in urn vas assaulted and beaten by i companion of Ball, when ths air assprtPflly were stealing rab- nK from Chaddock's place. Chaddock had been missing lecpntly. Determined to catch the thieves red-handed, slept near the hutches on ths ground, .inner! with a .20 gauge shotgun. Ball, according to Con- stable ITarrv Mozingo, who inves- igated later, had practically filled t sack with rabbits when one of them squealed, awakening Chad- dock. Chaddoek then said he aimed at figurp in the dark, shooting oft fingers and killing one rab- bit. At this point Chaddock was attacked liv the second man. Ths assailant knocked Chaddock down, scratched his face, choked him, took his shotgun away from him, Hit him over thp head with H and then disappeated in the darkness. Rnll nislipd to his automobile, whioh line! hcen parked on Main street, near the scene of the shoot- ing, and drove to the "Watsonvllln hospital where "Dr. TTpnry G. "Wat- tprs treated him. Ball was placed in the Santa Cruz county jail. Chico Supervisor to 'Wed Oroville Girl CHTCO, July of the engagement of Mrs. Vivian Brooks of Oroville and Supervisor A. IT. Mahon of Chico was yesterday at thp home Of the bride-elect's mother, Mrs. Lucy Richards, county auditor. The marriage will take place next fall. Lafayette Club to Hold Annual Meet LAFAYETTE, July 4. Annual meeting of the Lafayette Improve- ment club will be held "Wednesday night, July 6, according to notloet sent out today by Mrs. B." Gates, secretary. Annual reports will bP submitted and new officers elected. George S. Meredith, Oak- land hanker. Is president of _ club. THE CALEKDAR TONIGHT TRIBUNE radio broadcast. Fireworks display, p. LakP Mcrrltt. TDMORROWl TRIBUNE radio broadcast. Whist, Ashby Friendly AVhist club, p. m., As'hby hall, Berke- ley. AVhist, St. LPO'S parish, t p. m., Parish hall, Howe and Rldgeway strcels. Mazdaznan society meetlny, t p. m., 1419 Hnrrlson alreet. CLUBS TOM01UIOW Klwanls club luncheon, p. m., Hotel Oakland. Sclots Luncheon club meeting-, noon, PlK'n Whistle. Advertising club meeting, noon, Hotel Oakland. TempJo club session, p. m., Wilson's Nlneteenlh nnd Broadway. Bay View Improvement club meeting, 8 p. m., Bay View hall, Thirty-fourth and Pcralt.t streets. Business Association To Seat New Heads SANTA CRUZ, Julv R. Rhlpwav li tho new preMdpnt of the Snnta Cruz Business Men's As- sociation, elected nt the annual meeting to succeed R. F. Hocom. A. M. Sinclair was elected vlcp- prcsldont and B. M. Gulchard re- fnfnpd ns spcrplarv. The new directors, with thp president nnd vlcc-prpnidpnt, arp Chnrlcs N. William Dav- enhlll, Earl IT. Harris, B. F. Ho- com, John Holt, Burtt Owen, F. O. Rlltenhouse, Chnrlcs B. Trumbly, Percy A. Whitney and Douglas Toiinur. AT THE THEATERS Air" and nnd of the and "Ladles of the Jury." Brat" "Exppnsive AVoman." Century "Big Gamble" "Vanity Fair." wing." of the Circus" and "Nice AVomen." and Flesh." Tenderfoot" and "The Desert Song." of the South Seas." Golden the Doc- tor." Fool" and "Compromise." of Vlvlenne Ware." Lincoln "Shanghai Express" and "Oh, Oh, Cleopatra." Hands' vaudeville. Palace "Careless Lady" "Freighter ot Destiny." Squad" "Anybody's Blonde." Caballcro" "Careless Lndy." Crtay" and "In Line of Duty." Plaza "Texas Cyclone" "Expensive AVoman." comedy, PJxpert" and "Man- hattan Parade." Fnmous Ferguson Case." T. D. "Bad Girl" and "Wicked." HIP Mask" nnd "llaclng Youth." ATiAMUDA Law." SAN T'ttANimO Palace "ITIgh Speed" and at Piny." and and and and MR. AND MRS. Joe to Page 14 on a Breezy Day NOW DOHT HUgRy ME. IT ON FA6E 14 J_ 1 TAKE ir you! VDlNP UETS UP BERKEMDT Back Home" and "Whistling Dan." Rides ARaln." Rivoli "Gay Caballero'1 and "Careless Lndy." and orderly Conduct." ITAYWAKD Mouthpiece." 20 YEARS AGO July 4, 1912 (The day was WHEN THE POPULAR SONG IS EMOEO THr MELODY J-INC3E-R LOMOT IEASTBAY Professor Park A. Van TaMlI. local balloonist, furniihed a fea- ture of the annual celebration' Independence day by an aton from shore! Of liake Merrltt In new b a B made in Oak- land. Hal- loon was chrif- tened "Tha City of Oakland." Literary clsea were hold at the band- stand of nark. Joaqnln Miller, the ot the Sierra, read one of hll poems, w h 11 Rev. William T) n y pastor of t h Unitarian church, orator of the day. The "White drill ot the Oakland lodge, B. f, O, A, will compete In the grand drill competition In Portland week. The local by Colonel J. 1C. RUter, as one ot most proficient masters In the United ETvSEWHERK CORNING, N. T., July least 40 passengers were I 50 injured today when train crashed into the wts Lackawanna passenger train two miles east of this oltf. wrecked tratn, which New York to Buffalo, on the track a few mini the express train, whWi i passengers, struck It In at full speed. have been taken from i SFOKM LAS VKOAS, N, M Jim white today in the ninth ached tiled JftftWMt wM   

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