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Oakland Tribune Newspaper Archive: January 12, 1918 - Page 1

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   Oakland Tribune (Newspaper) - January 12, 1918, Oakland, California                                Oakland anil Vi- clnity C n s c t- Uccl weather. probably rain, moderate south- westerly winds. VOL. FIVE CENTS OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA, SATURDAY EVENING, JANUARY 12, 1918. NO. 144.. nin Dill Sea Craft Driven Ashore; Atlantic, Gulf and Lake Coasts Swept by Storms RIUMU Finn Brick Chimney, Blown Down at Lynn, Mass., Crashes Through Roof of Big Factory Indian Boys Are Burned to Death in Fire in School Indian, hoys were burned to death in a fire last night at the Dwight Indian Training School at Marble City. Oklahoma, about forty miles southeast of here. The fire de- stroyed the boys' dormitory. Its origin is unknown. SAGINAW, Mich., Jan. Five persons are missing and 'four were injured in a firs of undetermined origin early this morning which destrvoed the Wright Hotel during a terrific blizzard. Thirty-five guests were in the hotel and many nar- row escanes were reported. I Four Men Slain Wity Ax and j Fifth, Still Living, Says One i Man Committed the Crime 'ASSASSIN RECOGNIZED SEEKS TO KILL VICTIMS NO TRAINS MOVING 1. l t W Ikl nn -rn ouionon Wit W W I i 4 W W1 Soldiers In .Training Camps Are Suffering Heavily From Flood Waters; South Bears Brunt Snow and intense cold, in a gi- camicT arch, bending from Atlanta, Georgia, up to the Great Lakes and west to Kansas City and Den- ver blocked transportation today brought suffering and death to many homes. A tornado which swept portions of Alabama and Georgia added to the misery and a death list of sixteen, with more than 100 injuries, was reported in its wake. Of this number, six children were killed and forty in- jured when the tornado demol- ished a school house near Doth'an, Alabama. At Camp Wheeler- Ma- con. Georgia, the wind blew down sixteen hospital tents, leaving some 150 patients exposed for the mo- ment to the elements and the heavy rains flooded other tents, One private there was reported killed in the collapse of a corral. Business in Chicago stood still with, snow two feet on the level. Trains on all lines were blocked and local transportation was par- alyzed. Hold-Up of a National i Army Bank Is Declared to Be the Work of An Officer BV ASSOCIATED PHESS WIRE T> CAMP FUXSTOX, Tvas., Jan. Lewis R. "VYhisler of Salina. Kansas, who is understood to lune roDuoil me .-u-iiiy liuiiK. at tlic National Army Camp here sMid tojiayc killed, low ._ "men and "n "fifth, was found dead here late today. CAMP FUNSTON, Jan. ney Wornall Kansas City, the only five men who were in the bank at the national army canton- j merit here last night, when the In- stitution was robbed, told the atithorl- LONDON. Jan. M. S. Ka- ties the robber was an army captain coon'foundered and was lost with all j whom he recognized, it was an- aboard off the north coast of Ireland j nounced today. It is> understood he Wednesday, an admiralty statement j gavc the officers name. announced today. "womaH declared that one man iTIie statement said the robbcd the bank after wlth School Official Is Sent Threat hy Dynaniitards SACRAMENTO, Jan. letter threatening to dynamite the home of Will C. Wood, com- missioner of secondary schools, because of his advocacy of teach- ing of patriotism in the public schools, was turned over to the police today for investigation. The letter was received yes- terday by Commissioner Wood. It was mailed in San Francisco. It was printed in red ink with rubber stamp letters and bore the signature "T. M. T." The letter said a representa- tive was being sent to Sacra- mento "to look up'' Commis- sioner Wood's home and "attend to his case." A clipping of a story from a newspaper contain- ing a reference to Commissioner Wood's patriotic activities was attached to the letter. Creation of New Cabinet Officer Is Frowned Upon By the Secretary of War UP Charges the Loss of More Than! Fifteen Large Vessels to U. S. Flag to Congress Members 15 DF n n ii ii i ii n ANXIOUS TO DEFEND HIMSELF AND GOETHALS San Franciscan Asks Hearing Before 'Committee to Show He Didn't Block Steel Ships struck a rock. LOS AXGELE3. Jan. Ing that a ship loaded with thous-S BY INTERNATIONAL NF.WS SERVICE LEASED WIRE TO TRIBUNE i WASHINGTON. Jan. charging that the loss of more than' flag was due to "at least two mem- bers of William Denman 'of "today 'demaiitfecrthat the commerce committee of- the Sen- ate hear his story of why the pro-, gram of the shipping board has failed. Billions Damage by U-Boats Claim of German Press LONDON, Jan. ing the first year of Germany's- ruthless submarine campaign, which has now become a princi- pal factor in naval warfare, is being expanded and developed still further. Summarizing the results of the under-water campaign since February-1. the Tagblatt claims that the U-boats have sunk on an average tons of ship- ping monthly from February to December, and for the whole year the toll may be expected to show nearly tons, and, that the building of new ships fay the entente and neutrals dur- ing the year will replace only between and Ions of these losses. The newspaper says the monetary. loss to Germany's enemies as the result of the vpnr'a wnrlr riv -will reach figuring the value of the ships at per ton and their cargoes at the same rate. fiaker Again Made Target for Grilling by Senate Probe Committee in Examination I COUNTRY IS ENTITLED TO ccci orniiorr ur on vc Wl I W Loss of rhe.se vessels, Destmar. says, ands of worth -of arms and re ,We for the ammunition had sailed from San Pe- dro for Mexico four months agro, is responsible for the present famine in Boston, New York and "General'' Nicholas Zogsr, one of thej Philadelphia. Denman wants to tell his story in 'show that neither he nor General I I Goethals lost the country a single steel an ax four of the five men in the The Racoon was a destrojer of thu I building and injuring the fifth so 1310 class and was 2GG feet long! badly that he probably will die. vith a beam of '28 feet. She dis-! Wornall, the cashier of the bank. Placed 913 tons and her engines "covered consciousness'for a short three men accused of conspiring! public, he says, and claim? it will against the neutrality law and a fig-! lire in the bitter controversy here be- tween the military and federal Hig Jetter tQ genator Fletch thorities m the alleged gun running] cnairman the comraittee, is as fol- j plot, today said he was ready toiiows: confess details of other gun-running "In answer to the questions to some plots to the government. of the Senators, evidence has been "I will tell all I know if they treat' elicited that fifteen steel ships were' me: right." Zogg said. "I have posi-'not commandeered and were lost to live evidence that a ship loaded with I our flag because of neglect due to' arms and ammunition valued at j differences between General Goethals; i thousands of dollars s.iilf-d from San and myself. The press of the country! sixty-mile JTalc which swept this coast last night drove throo ooc-an steamers apround in tlic harbor here. The are hard and fast, but none, is thought to be in serious danger. the storm has tied up shipping at this port no serious damage been reported. CHILDREN KILLED IX COLLAPSE OF SCHOOL ATLANTA. On.. Jan. tor- nado which yesterday evening swept portions of Alabama and Georgia caused deaths at the following places: 'ow.irts. Ala.. killed and 25 Dothan. Ala. six children killed arid 40 injured in collapse of in the country near I'Jo.han: Webb. Ala., one killed and estimated TO injured in destruction of store nnd other buildings: Troy. .Mi.. onr> kili.eu nnd several injured: ?.Iacon. one kilb-d at Camp Whee- ler and several Iniured. The wave that extended .is far as l-'orida was preceded by an low barometric pressure. being recorded nt Knoxville, r. I'.ie thunderstorms and lightning ac- iipanied a heavy snow fall at As-he- 1t was thought today that sleet and v were the chief onuses of the isolation of most of the towns and that little or no damage had resulted in the larger cities. of the, war she was armed with onejWornaU's injuries probably will provo four-inch and three three-inch guns [fatal, physicians believed.' and two torpedo tubes. Her comple- TjriTJTJinj ment was 105 men. IT all her crewl KUttiSbK was lost probably at least 100 men j KILLS VICTIM perished. i According'to Woj-nall. an insistent ALL OlN BOARD HA.LL.OOJN j knock at the door of the bank build- LOST WITH VESSEL about' o'clock last night I caused thfm to admit a man who All those on board the Racoon, immediately covered them with a re- when the vessel sank were lost. The volver. lhen commanded Wor- statement issued by the Admiralty j lo (ie the of tne others, sajs: j Wornall says, after which he tied "H. M. S. Racoon. Lieut. George! -woman's hands. Xapier in command, struck on thej Roman's description of the rob- rocks off the North coast of Ireland, her.s ncxt ls riUher indefinite, at 2 o'clock in the morning on ed-1 He sajd nc tnousrht the robber nesday during a snow storm and suh-i reallzcd tnat he waf; .recognized by sequently foundered with all hands. of his victilns that he de- "Xt'ie of 'hr1 crew had bo-en behind at her last port of call and; ,-pr- thefte are the sole survivors. Seven-' teen biclics have been picked up by BEATEN WITH AX nalro! craft and are beiner buried at Kcthmullen Five more bodies were said he picked up a hand washed ashore and they are being from the floor and tegan raining buried locallv." fa! blows upon the heads and faces of Believes -the Departments of Crazier and Sharpe Are Up to the Standard; Satisfactory unanimously reported twelve to fifteen large that from i steel vessels Pedro for Mexico under the noses of the government officers four months ago. 1 had been lost and most of them put "I will tell the government every-1 the responsibility on me. j thing I know of gun-running plots GQETH4I S i they will treat me right. I won't tell 1 tiTM-cr-T T? d 'that army bunch a thing." llliUSiiLr 1 Zogg. Xorbert Myles nnd Charles j ..T Viin show lhat 11O ]oss of anv PT3TROGRAD. .Tnn. ance by tbc LVntral powers of For- 1 etgn Minisier Trotsky's proposal to continue the Russo-German armistice on all fronts for an additional month was forma 1'y announced today. The neutrality law. At the request of, participants in saving over a million their Attorney the -earing was con-1 tons ot lo the American ilag. tinned until January ..j wil] shou. -hat of Four members of the federal ventlng the operation of some one l grand jury, which is investigating the else's commandeering order it was I' controversy between the authorities ,v, jd preventing the' FNFMY which was an outgrowth of the ar-, f] the Ian I i-nct nf tlio fhrep mm. were in the _ lur the mobilization of all able- (Continued on Page 2, Col. 3) rest of the three men. were in' the; ten days of our and ing the disagreeKK-nt ecu Genet'al nnd thp ninmrnv of tlio board concerning the Hog island con- tract. upon the helpless men. The mutiny in F- vice-president of the the eastern National Keserve Bank of Kansas LOXDOX. .Ian. 1 :he German army on front has now spread to the Austro- City and eas-hier of the Army Bank. Hungarian army. Petrograd des- Viiis the first man attacked. He died patches toduv quoted German de- early today, serters as that Austrian troop.s U. M. Hill and holding the line in the Tnrnopnl were next strucl- Ohelson. clerks, down, after which sector, in Galici.i. mutined, and that the mar. attacked AVornall and John fighting has taken place between Jewell of Springfield. was found by a. sentry. Winterf received four or five severe thf mutineer.- viMons. A nu-v on both .--ides. LT..UOO Austrian-Slav di- I li-er ot men were killed cuts on the bead and forehead. Hill German mutineers at'and Jewel! v.ere beaten on the head Kovuo. in Poland, have taken almost beyond recognition, session of the city and at last reports "The murders were committed bv were still holding it. although they a captain." Woman is said to have wcie IvMnc shelUd by loyal artillery- tnp authorities. "He wore, no men. ____ mask. He came into the bank and _ e. j said he was '-hor; of money and hated eLnenfv' trem'hls t" _ 'winters uas well ac.'.uaimed taking a few nri.-Mners. Field .Marshal mv Haig reported. BY UNITED PRESS WISE TO TRIKulCE CHICAGO. Jan. tenter of, tho which has been sweeping: Apcross the countrj. fur three ex-, )jTinded during the night and today extended from the upper l.xkes region i to the St. Lawrence valley and south-j ward to the Atlantic seaboard. At uoon the wave up the tight! to clcnr streets. The cold was too, bitter tor the men to work. I Nowhere was the Arctic blight moro Although thousands of soldiers, i county officials and civilians scoured BL'IONOS AIRES. Nov. num-ithe surrounding country all night and. ber of Argentine newspapers con-1 today, no trace has been found of, ACCIDENTS 3 DIE siuer that the vXLentiuii of-the Ger-[ the, man barred to include the trade Ohleson uas Killed instantly by a routes between South America and i blow on the lorehead from the ax. Europe, is an unfriendlv act toward j blade. this country. The papers renew Just how much money the robber their demands that the government] obtained was not announced by siver relations with Germany. i authorities. i courtroom for the hearing. i Colonel Louis Goodier, judge advo- I (.ate geueru.1 oi. the itpall- ment of the army, was also present.1 Branding the arrest and detention j ..j i of Myles as highhanded, unsupport- j ed by law and in open violation of the; I fundamental right of American citi-1 zens." the federal grand jury this tlocg Goethals. afternoon reported to Judge Benja- ,nn dofs fonf.prn at lcast uvo miu F. Bledsoe asking that the result ,JCrs who ,IlouUi of its investigation in the case jn ,hp'responsibility, referred to the attorney general ofi (he rt.i'atjuliship th United States and becretary ,ORS o( the; shortage of fuel and coal in larger cities. Cu New York and I'hiladelphi. had retained them and u the coal faniir1'' in _ __- ciiies would have been CHOLERA EPIDEMIC; vSsELs" LOST" OVER STOCKHOLM. Jan. epi- VIGOROUS PROTEST will s.iou thai Hi'M- were lost OVT "Though pcrruiiailv r.ot with the Sloan contract, i mMivku I will be ahl" to jus'tifv .1. Gen- eral connection with lhat transaction. "I will   assr-ricd. u ere taken prisoner, were lost to "the flag and will pl.icu; The Japanese admiralty does not the blame where it belongs. Tins e the rejiort although the loss of the ship, en route to Delago Bay ''olonibo. has been known. WASHIXGTOX, Jan. lishment of a munitions director was disapproved today by Secretary Baker I in testifying before the Senate mili- tary committee, who said the reor- ganization of the war department is virtually similar to the British muni- tions purchasing system. Despite strong support in the Sen- ate military committee the proposal to create a department of munitions j Headed by a new cabinet officer is I not favored by President Wilson and j indications are that it will not get far in the House. The President's attitude was made known to Representatives who called at the hite House yesterday. He was said to have expressed utmost confidence in Secretary Baker and advanced the opinion that the work of supplying munitions would be ade- quately handled by the present or- ganization of the navy and war de- partments. Secretary Baker came in for more sharp today at the hands of the Senate military commit- tee conducting the war inquiry. The committee demanded to know what had been done about 1200 Lewis machine guns held in storage while cantonments and camps need them for practice. Secretary Baker promised that they immediately would be distributed and Senator Weeks observed that the dis- tribution had been delayed a month. "That is the essence of this whole is too much delay. Things that should be done at once are de- layed when every day counts." Baker cited statistics of shortage early in IDecember and how- supplies (Continued on Page 2, Col. 2) War Baker. The jury's report com-' pletely exonerated fnited States District Attorney J. Hubert O'Connor' of any implication in the plot to ship1 munitions into Mexico. j filmic of choi.T.'! lias broken out in 1 the Caucasus, according to a des- 1 patch from todaj. Hun-' Ji-cd.-, of ciirred. The i.- that section of Russia lying. the Black Sea 'and the Caspian Sea and bordering on' Turkish Armenia. Answers Flood Tribune Advertiser (Continued on Page 2, Cols. 2-3) lo include th" Cape Verde Is-1 lands, thp Island of Madeira and parti 
                            

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