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Norco Pony Express: Thursday, February 26, 1976 - Page 1

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   Norco Pony Express (Newspaper) - February 26, 1976, Norco, California                                 MORCO  Vol. 14, No. 7  Thursday, February 26,1976  Phone 734-0210  .......... ■.......^  Office 2429 Hamner Ave., NORCO, CALI FORNI A  PRICE—50'A MONTH  SOpK J A AND GREG Hí:RNANDEZ  Home from Korea  H  1  ti  Cold turkey is the only way lo -describe how Peace Corps volunteers learn the language of the country in recent times.  Greg Hernandez of Norco, back from Korea with a Korean bride, said It's the best way.  He learned it an older way, one which has since been abandoned, at least in Korea. He was taken, along with other new volunteers, to a remote resort-style hotel and drilled in Korean. But there was no practical way to use it there.  New volunteers today are greeted in Seoul and are given some Korean" money and a few maps. One to find ^eir way to the Seoul bus depot, one of their training site out in thé COTintry and one to find their way from the village depot to. the site. That's it.  They must find their way after a day in -Seoul-alone.  On arriving at thè village, about 150 miles from Seoul, where the training will be, they move into a Korean home. Only one volunteer to a home makes them advance rapidly in language skills.  Hernandez said the new method has cut Peace Corps costs greatly and cut training time in half.  Hernandez, 25. spent a little more than two years in Korea and, while there met Sook Ja, who is 23. They had a civil wedding last June 6 and a church wedding July 12. As she was brought up a Methodist, they Were married in the Methodist church.  - He taught' industrial education, including a year at a rural vocational U-aining center. The course included agricultural mechanics, machine shop and basic electricity. Student ages varied from 16 to 20 years old.  He learned his own skills at the Lohg Beach Naval Shipyard and, as he'd thought about the Peace Corps  A plan to send some Nor&o council members and staff to Sacramento this week hit a snag when -City Manager Si Melendez told the council Tuesday night that officials at the capital only want to see staff, at least initially.  Council members Art McpoUuni and O.M. (Red) Taylor, City Engineer Hubert Webb and Melendez had planned to go north to plead with the state Water Quality Control Board on its recommendation that Norco be placed in a low priority for a Mwage grant.  Melendez said he talked with grant team members Monday and that they said they prefer to meet with staff rather than elected officials although they would meet with council members at a later date.  The council voted to send Melendez and Webb op March 4. Melendez said Corona City Manager Jim Wheaton was also interested in going on that date to discuss the Corona sewage plant.  Thecouncil may decide to send one' or two of its members after that date and before a board public hearing on priorities and grants M^rch 15 if it's felt it would help. It wants to make , sure. Norco gets on the heayng agenda and gets on early enough to return to Norco for a regular council meeting that night. It has its own public hearing set then, on the Sixth Street negative declaration.  Melendez saic^ he again explained  Council election Tuesday  ¿V<^rc<i/iians will ,go. to the polls Tuesday to elect two ¿ity councilmen. There are no other issues on the ballot.  Only three names are on the ballot but three other men are running as write-in candidates.  Incumbents, both running for their own seats, are Harry Brinton and Richard (Doc) Brown. The third name on the ballot is M. Bud King, a former councilman who was recalled along with two others in 1973, mainly over the issiie of the routing of Interstate 15.  since he was in junior high, he decided to apply as a volunteer. " AsRed^^boui any"fiascos~in~Korea— he said that when he was to take his first bus ride to Seoul from his village, he hopped on the wrong bus. "It said Seoul on it alright, but it was the slow one. It went on backroads all the way. The highway bus takes two hours and that one took eight hours."  He said his Korean "mom," in the home where he was placed, was just about like any other mother. "She scolded me if I got in late but made .sure I got a meal.  'ifs-an-oddity-to-be-foreigri-and-speak Korean jndjt's a real oddity to be foreign in rural areas and speak Korean," he said. He told of being . tested by country folk whenever there was occasion to talk. They really were surprised whenever they realized he could speak the language, he said.  He noted that the notorious word, "gook," originated in Korea during the war there. It wasn't coined from whole cloth he said, but was contracted from (he Korean name for the country, "Hangook," which means the country of Han. Koreans do not call their country Korea, he pointed out, saying that most American names of countries do not jibe with the national names used in the variousjanguages.  Korea is a cold country in the winter and most homes have an ancient heating system, perfected back in the mists of time. A charcoal brazier is built into a lean-to outside and has a system of pipes going under the floor, venting on the other side. The heat carried through the pipe warms the rooms. The brazier is used for all the household cooking and goes continuously. -  Persons interested in more information about the Peace Corps may call the toll-free number, 800-424-8580, Hernandez said.  The first write-in candidate is RobCTt Rinehart. H6did qualify for the ballot because all those signing his' nomination papers were not registered voters.  The second write-in candidate is Tom O'Neal. He decided to run as a write-in rather late in the campaign, filing just last week.  The third write-in candidate is Louis de Bottari who was recalled in the same election as King. De Bottari waited until the afternoon of  the last day possible to file as  which he was elected, he waited until the last day to obtain and file his nomifiation papers but he was a nominated candidate then and had his name on the ballot.  Names of ' write-in candidates do not appear on the ballot and must be literally written in below the printed names.  All registered voters should have received sample ballots last week. If someone has not  received one and thinks he  with the County Elections Department in Riverside. Apparently many persons have been purged from the rolls and are not aware of it. Purging comes when someone fails to vote' in a general election. >  Polls open at 7 a.m. and close at 8 p .m. Tuesday.  Stories on Brinton, Brown and King appeared in earlier issues. Stories on Rinehart, O'Neal and de Bottari are elsewhere on this page.  City to plead its sewer case in Sacramento trip  Norco's bad septic tank situation north of Fourth Street and that the city can't afford to put in a system tbere itself.  He said he told Sacramento that it is unfair that half a city can't get a grant when whole cities do. Norco has been told that its partial system puts it in a low priority.  Melendez also said that he has a thick sheaf of complaints on overflowing septic tanks dated over the past three years.'That material will go to the county Departnient of Public Health for aid in preparing a report that part of Norco is a health hazard because of the lack of sewers.  It was suggested that building department records be combed to find data on extiended leach lines and potholes dug to add to the complaint li^t. '  Riverside man sells 1965 Honda  Joe Wagner of Riverside sold his 1965 Honda with the help of a Guaranteed Resists classified ad in The Pony Express.  If you have an item you'd like to sell, a Guaranteed Results classified ad may be what jeu're looking for. Telephone 734-0210 and ask for Gu^nteed Results.  Three write-in candidates  .....Robert Rinehart  Robert Rinehart knows he doesn't have the Norco council election wrapped up, especially since he is  around growth and the attitude seems to be worry later."  He sees a lack of efficiency at city hall through a failure to delegate authority and says the obligation is  the capacity is going to new homfes in the bluff area.  "I question the adequacy of police protection," he said, citing the growing numbers of people and the  running as a writeMrTcandidaterHe's— determined to try for it anyway.  He failed to get his name on the ballot because a few of those signing his nomination papers turned out to be unregistered as voters, thus voiding the papers. Twenty valid signatures are required.  The family moved to Norco 16 months ago from an area in Orange County where animals were still allowed but on which the urban area was rapidly encroaching.  Theyhaveacowandpigs-and-other— animals because he and his wife, Katherine, think it's good for children to help raise animals for food "and learn about life." Norco, said Rinehart, 36, is one of the few remaining areas where animals can be kept.  Norco's major problem right now is bringing services into line with growth, he feels. "It's difficult to play catch-up." Fire services are particularly critical, he thinks, and improving it will be costly but worth it because a saving will be realized in terms of losses. The new building and equipment should be expedited and then salaries and maintenance should be considered, he said.  Because he hasn't lived in Norco long, Rinehart said, "I don't profess to know all the problems or what the city has or has not done. I see problems though, that reVolve  -on-the city-council-to see-thaLalLruns_sprawling' residential areas which  smoothly. An example, he said, would be to allow street department employes to give citations to persons parking on riding trails.  are far apart. He said there are many-simple traffic problems. He would like to See" the contract with the sheriff's department evaluated to see how much of the money goes for crime lab facilities, record-keeping and the jail over and above the amount paid to deputies and for units. If Norco is classed as a low crime rate area, he said, why pay for services that may not be needed. .  "I'd like to see Norco stay as the ilast Western town," he concluded.  Lou de Bottari  "I decided at the last minute," said •ex-councilman Louis de Bottari of his candidacy for city council. He filed a -declaration Monday to run as a write-in candidate.  ROBERT RINEHART  Another major; problem, still growth-related,.is sewer capacity, he said, noting that residents north of Fourth Street needssewers but that  Sparsely sage,,.  Make that extra day count  BY BETTE REINCKE . This year is one of those lucky ones that come along every four years, giving everyone an entire extra day to live. It's a year of 366 days, rather than the usual 365, and the actual day falls next Sunday, Feb. 29.  It's all because of two fellows in Europe who were clever about astronomy, Aloysius Lilius and Christopher Ciavius, who worked out a calendar adopted by Pope Gregory XIII in 1582. It's called the Gregorian Calendar.  It happened because the calendar then used, the Julian Calendar, kept having things occur too soon as the years piled up. It got so bad that days like the spring equinox and summer solstice were coming 11 days ahead of themselves, mixing up farmers and Easter Sundays and so on. It was annoying, to say the least.  Just to catch up in 1582, the calendars dropped 10 whole days right out. Those going along with the Pope got calendars that showed Oct. 4 to be followed by Oct. 15, putting the first day of spring back where it belonged the next year, on March 21.  Those who are young enough to still be here in the year 2000 will see an ujrfcommori thing. In order to really make the Leap Year idea work, a few extra days that crop up every thousand years or so had to be taken care of. So any century year-like 1900, for instance--that could not be divided by 400 would not be a Leap Year, even though it would be a fourth year. But 2000 can be divided by 400 so it will be a Leap Year. •  Fixing up any calendar to work seems like a formidable task and I certainly admire Lilius and Ciavius but it seems even , they weren't perfect. Even the Gregorian Calendar has a fault.  You see, the calendar year actually allows 26 extra seconds to occur, annually which is a big problem every 3,323 years because that adds up to an extra day in that time span.  If they had only realized that, they could have saved us the problem every 3,323 years by oniitting Leap Year every 128 » years. That would fix it, or at least, the problem would be avoided until 100,000 years elapse. That's how long it would take to grabthat extra day. '  Knowing all that, doesn't it make you feel that you should live it up on Sunday? Grab hold of your extra day and do something you've always wanted to do but never had the time for. Take a walk, build a fence, sit and think, do something to celebrate found time.  Rinehart is an attorney but spent 13~ years as a police, officer in Huntington Beach. He was a lieutenant in vice and narcotics.  He and his wife have three sons; Scott 15, Dane 13, and Kris 4.  Thomas O'Neal  Norco got a second write-in candidate for city council last week when Tom O'Neal filed a declaration to run.  O'Neal, 24, Jives at 3717'4i Corona Ave., and says he's running to "get some youth on the board." He said he'd like to "bring a little progress" to Norco while keeping it rural," referring specifically to the local streets:  New businesses are needed here, • he stated, "like grocery stores." He is himself in the grocery business, as a checker for Ralph's supermarket. He feels an important issue is adding more tennis courts to the city and said he and his committee are now studying costs of acquiring and improving bicycle routes.  He i^ "undecided" on the growth issue and whether or not it should be limited but said he. is studying the issue. He is also studying the high-quality water problem, he said.  "Interstate 15 can go through Norco without wrecking the beautiful  "I felt the other write-in candidates were not giving the people a choice. I feel we need as many as possible on the council to have growth control."  He said an ordinance requiring all new tract homes to have dry sewer lines and'septic tanks built, was "an election eve move."  He said the, urgency ordinance ncalls"forairthl)s~e-who-paid-forsewers-through Assessment District 109 to be exempt from it and, said de Bottari, that includes the whole bluff area. He  TOM O'NEAL  homes," he said, but he hasn't decided where.  He is for continuing to contract with the sheriff's office for police, rather than establishing a city force. It. is less expensive, he said.  He started out in politics at a young age, he said, working in thè cam- . paigns of such men as ex-Sen. George Murphy, ex-Gov. Ronald Reagan, state Assemblyman Jerry Lewis, ex-state senator John Harmér and Gov. Jerry Brown. That all started in 1964, he noted.  ; He' received ' an - AA degree , .in business administration from Long Beach City College and has worked as a checker for six years.  He said he is interested in horses but has none. He does have a steer, he said.  LOUIS DE BOTTARI  said it can only apply to property north of Fourth Street.  De Bottari moved to Norco from Torrance in 1967. He was appointed to the planning commission in 1971 and ran for city council the following March. Thé recall came along a little more than a year after that election. It was the Interstate 15 routing fight that was the basic reason for the recall although the bitterness overflowed into other subjects as well.  Since his remqval from the council, de Bottari plagues the present council regularly over a variety of matters. It's even got to the point that when he doesn't speak a council member, a bit sardonically, will ask him if he doesn't have a comment.  De Bottari is closely identified with the Norco Property Owners Association, especially in its fight against 1-15 and in two recent tries to get an issue on the ballot. To daté the ballot issues are lost, though the one on the council's riding trail zone deletion in front of Norco Junior High has been appealed.  De Bottari, 49, works at North' American Rockwell in Anaheim. He and his wife, Marilyn, have four youngsters.  1-15 hearing  Norconians are asked to attend tonight's (Thursday) public meeting to kick off an in-depth study of Interstate l . 15. State .highway officials willpreside.  The meeting is at 7:30 p.m. at Norco Junior High, in the multi-use room.  I  V   

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